History of Civilization in England, Volumen 1

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J. W. Parker and son, 1861

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Decline of manufactures and of population and increase
77
But the authority of the Church had so enfeebled the national
89
Government attempted to remedy this ignorance by calling
98
The influence of foreigners in Spain was displayed in the expul
108
But it was of no avail because politicians can do nothing when
115
Summary of what was accomplished for Spain by the govern
128
For the reasons already stated their efforts were fruitless not
135
Those general causes predetermined the country to superstition PAGR
138
And has possessed great patriots and great legislators
144
This it is which isolating Spain from the rest of the civilized
151
CHAPTER II
157
Roman invasion of Scotland 163164
163
The injuries which these invasions inflicted upon Scotland stopped
173
CHAPTER IV
176
Evidence of the scanty population of the Scotch towns 179184
179
The municipal element being thus imperfect the only ally which
187
CHAPTER III
197
The Crown in its efforts against the nobles was encouraged
206
The nobles revenged themselves by becoming Reformers 212213
212
As the nobles took the opposite side and as the people had no
216
In 1546 Cardinal Beaton was assassinated and Knox began
223
But circumstances made him inductive and he collected facts
224
In 1559 the queen regent was deposed the nobles became
229
Thereupon the Protestant preachers said that the nobles were
236
The first manifestation of this rebellious spirit was the attack
242
The movenient being essentially democratic could not stop there
278
Violent language used by the clergy against the king and against
282
Still the crisis was terrible and the people and their clergy were
284
The only powerful friends of this bad government were
293
Reasons which induced the Highlanders to rebel in favour of
300
Another cause was the failure of the Rebellion of 1745
308
They moreover declared that harmless and even praiseworthy
383
To prevent such imaginary sins the clergy made arbitrary regu
393
But the clergy by denouncing these pleasures of the senses
401
CHAPTER VI
410
Hence the secular philosophy of the eighteenth century though
418
Summary of the most important distinctions between induction
419
Its method 427432
427
That conclusion was entirely speculative and unsupported by
432
Account of his Theory of Moral Sentiments 437442
437
Humes philosophy 458474
458
Hence his injustice to Bacon whose method was diametrically
464
Comparison between the method of this work and the method
473
Reid attacked Humes method because he disliked the results
479
Opposition between the method of Reid and that of Bacon 485486
485
Blacks philosophy 491501
491
He reasoned from his principles speculatively instead of occupy
497
Black therefore did immense service by giving free scope to
507
Of these two methods the English followed the inductive
515
Sir James Hall afterwards took the matter up and empirically
524
Nature of the evidence of the supposed difference between
532
Comparison between the method of Cullens pathology and
540
His conclusions like his premisses represent only a part of
546
His natural disposition was towards deduction
554
By this means he made a large number of curious physiological
555
He recognized the great truth that the sciences of the inorganic
563
In this way general causes always triumph over particular
565
But his English contemporaries being eminently inductive so dis
573
Notwithstanding this difference the deductive method was
579
Theology forms the only exception to this rule 583584
583
These superstitions are eminently irreligious and are every where
595

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Página 42 - This royal throne of kings, this scepter'd isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea...
Página 447 - The uniform, constant, and uninterrupted effort of every man to better his condition, the principle from which public and national, as well as private opulence is originally derived, is frequently powerful enough to maintain the natural progress of things toward improvement, in spite both of the extravagance of government, and of the greatest errors of administration.
Página 447 - Parsimony, and not industry, is the immediate cause of the increase of capital. Industry, indeed, provides the subject which parsimony accumulates; but whatever industry might acquire, if parsimony did not save and store up, the capital would never be the greater.
Página 469 - Here, then, is the only expedient from which we can hope for success in our philosophical researches : to leave the tedious, lingering method, which we have hitherto followed ; and, instead of taking, now and then, a castle or village on the frontier, to march up directly to the capital or centre of these sciences, to human nature itself, which being once masters of, we may everywhere else hope for an easy victory.
Página 438 - We do not originally approve or condemn particular actions; because, upon examination, they appear to be agreeable or inconsistent with a certain general rule. The general rule, on the contrary, is formed, by finding from experience, that all actions of a certain kind, or circumstanced in a certain manner, are approved or disapproved of.
Página 42 - This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed and famous by their birth, Renowned for their deeds as far from home, For Christian service and true chivalry, As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's Son ; This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land, Dear for her reputation through the world...
Página 438 - As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation.
Página 464 - Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man as perhaps the nature of human frailty will permit.
Página 455 - What are the common wages of labour depends everywhere upon the contract usually made between those two parties, whose interests are by no means the same. The workmen desire to get as much, the masters to give as little, as possible. The former are disposed to combine in order to raise, the latter in order to lower, the wages of labour.
Página 282 - Eglintoun and Glencairn on the brink of breaking ; many of our chief families estates are cracking ; nor is there any appearance of any human relief for the time.

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