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UNDERMINE THE EDIFICE OF MY FAITH, 35. 27.
UNDERSTANDINGS, abstract used for concrete. (See Note on p. 8

1. 29); WISEST UNDERSTANDINGS, men of the wisest intellect, 73. ult. :
BorrowED UNDERSTANDINGS, minds full of borrowed thoughts, 97.

14.
UNDERVALUE, to rate too low, 226. 14.
*UNDERWEENING of Life, undervaluing, 226. 14.
UNDETERMINED CONTROVERSIE, unsettled, 58. 31.
UNEXERTED, not yet called into action, 175. ult.
UNEXISTENT, not existing, 214. 25.
UNHEARD-OF Stars, not yet discovered, 107. 10.
UNHINGE, to disturb, confuse, 17. 23.
*UNIMAGINED, as yet unthought of, 17. 19.
*UNITERABLE Life, that cannot be lived over again, 224. 20.
UNLIMITABLE, illimitable, without bounds, 78. 23.
*UNLIVED, deducted from our life, annulled, 146. 9.
UNMAN NOT THYSELF, lose not the dignity of a human being, 215. 10.
UNNATURALS, unnatural proceedings, 220. 27.
*UNNECESSITY, absence of necessity, 134. 9.
UNPARALLEL'D WORLD, without parallel, exceptional, 202. 11.
UNREADY TO PART WITH, 142. 12.
UNRECLAIMED REASON, undisciplined (a term in falconry), 19. 20.
UNREMARKABLE (IT IS NOT), it is worthy of remark, 41 29

NSATIABLE WISHES, insatiable, not to be satisfied, 77. 25.
UNSEPARABLE, inseparable, 200. 30.
UNSTABLE BELIEF, wanting in stability, 43. 23.
UNTHINKING HEADS, thoughtless, 209. 19.
UNTHOUGHT OF OCCURRENCES, unexpected, 30. 29.
UNTOUCHT PART (COMMON AND), not reached, not affected, 122. 2.
UNTRACTIBLE TEMPER, intractable, 46. 10.
UNTWINE THAT LINE, to untwist, 24. 20.
UNWARY UNDERSTANDING, unguarded, susceptible of impressions, 7. 14.
UNWELCOME Beasts, applied to beasts of prey, 39. 25.
URN AND ASHES OF THE VATICAN, the combustion of the Library, 42. 17:

URN OF THE PRÆTOR, 220. 3. (See Note.)
USE Upon Use in Folly, a law term used here for reduplication, repeti.

tion, 149. 25: 165. 7.
USURY (Pious), applied to alms-giving, 164. 23.
UTINAM (A MELANCH LY), a wish with expression of regret (Lat., used

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as a subs.), 42. 29; used in Pseud. Epid., i. 10. p. 77. ed. Bohn.
VACUITY, emptiness, vacuum, 78. 5, 25: VACUITY FROM CARES, exemption,
VAGABOND AND COUNTERFEIT EGYPTIANS, the Gypsies, 95. 25.
VARICOSE VEINS, swelled and crooked, 298. pen.
VATICAN, the Papal Palace at Rome, used especially for the Library, 42.

17.
VEERINGS (CROSS TACKS AND), turning of ships at sea, 148. 6 : 162. 3.
VEGETATION, existence without sensation, 63. 27.
VEGETIUS, his "Mulomedicina," referred to, 138. 20.
VEIN (Royal), the vena basilica in the arm, one of the veins commonly

chosen for blood-letting, 188. 13.

terane

140. 11.

VENERABLE, time-honoured, 48. 29; VENERABLE WAY, reverential,

74. 29.

VENERIES, venereal desires, 50. 24.
VENICE, mentioned, 12. 10: 85. 28 : 129. antep.
VENNY'= venew, assault (in fencing), é6. 7.
VENTILATION (GENTLE) OF THE SPIRIT OF GOD (metaph.), fanning,

influence, 52. 22.
VENÚS (the planet), mentioned, 206. pen.
VENUS'S MOLES, 195. 6.
VERINGS. (See VEERINGS.)
VERITY, truth, 85.8; VERITIES, 84. 17.
VERTICAL POINTS, highest, 31. 18.
VESPILLOES (Lat.), corpse-bearers, 62. 2.
VICINITY, nearness, 197. 18.
VICISSITUDE (BLESSED) OF THE NEXT (WORLD), change, 314. 17; RE:

VOLUTION AND VICISSITUDE, caused by the swing of the wheel,“*
31. 14 ; SULLEN VICISSITUDES, caused by “the wheel of things,” 217.

pen. ; TO ACT OVER SUCH VICISSITUDES, regular changes, 227. 29 : 315.1.
VICTORIUS (ANGELUS), his Metlic. Consult., quoted, 130. 29.
VIENNA, a residence unfit for cholical persons, 129. 29.
VILLAIN, wicked wretch, 36. 16 : 120. 29; VILLANY, 70. 5.
VINDICATIVE, revengeful, 213. 7.
VIRBIUS, (quasi bis vir,) the surname of Hippolytus, who was restored 19

life (Ovid, Metam. xv. 545). VIRBIUSES, persons who have revivei

after being supposed to be dead, 296. 36.
VIRĞIL, quoted, 64. ult.
VIRGIL (POLYDORE), his Hist. Anglic., quoted, 137. 13.
VIRGILIUS, Bp. of Saltzburg, 45. 30. (See Note.)
VIRTUE OF The Sun, force, power, 52. 14.
VISAGE (MORTAL), face presaging death, 134. 22.
VISIBLE HANDS OF GOD, applied to second causes, 33. ult.
VISITATION OF GOD, scrutiny, 29. 1.
VISIVE ORGANS, visual, 216. 2.
VITAL SULPHUR, a Paracelsian term designating a supposed substance

intimately connected with life and longevity, 68. 4. (Comp. RADICAL

BALSAM, Radical HUMOUR.)
VITIOSITY, vitiousness, 67. 21 ; VITIOSITIES, forms of vice, 107. 11,
VITRIFICATION, OR A REDUCTION OF A BODY INTO GLASS, 80. 9.
VIVACIOUS ABOMINATIONS, longlived, 201. ult.
VIZARD, a mask, 49. 21: 220. 26; VIZARD VICES, masqued, 192. 24.
VOICE OF THE WORLD, what the world says, 101. 30.
VOLÉE (À LA), OR AT RANDOM, without purpose, 95. 16.
VOLUPIÀ, the goddess of sensual pleasure, 185. 6.
VOTES OF HELL (Lat. votum), wishes, 105. 30.
*VOUCHSAFE (subs.) vouchsafement, condescending to grant, 234. 20.
VULCAN, 180. 17; HIS ART, as an armourer, 174. 30.; used for a person

walking slowly and with dificulty, opposed to Achilles, 221. 6.
VULGAR WAY, suited to the mass of mankind, 72. 17.
WAIL, wailing and gnashing of teeth, 224. 26.
WAKED SENSES, awake, 116. 29.
WAKING subs.), awakening, 118. 20.

175. 11.

WALLS OF FLESH, 60. 14; WALLS OF MAN, 58. 21; the human body.
WANE (IN THE), in process of decay, 230. 1.
WANTED (THERE HAD NOT) ENOUGH Who, persons would have been

found who, 297. 6.
WARD, guard (in fencing), TO LIE AT CLOSE WARD AGAINST, to be de-

fended against, 86. 6.
WARTS (NOT ONLY MOLES, BUT), blemishes, 186. pen.
WARY OF, 296. 19; WARY IN, 133. 23 ; cautious of, indisposed to.
WASHES (VIRTUOUS), cleansings, 206. 14.
WAXEN CONSCIENCE, apt “to take the impression of each single pecca-

dillo,too sensitive, 106. 28.
WEB OF Sin, entanglement, 86. 3.
WEEDS OF THE BRAIN, wild thoughts, 59. 11.
WELL-INTENDED ENDEAVOURS, 112. 29.
WELL-RESOLVED CHRISTIAN, whose faith is firmly established, 62. 7.
WELL-TEMPERED, well disposed; MINDS, 191. 25 ; TIMES, 228. 30.
WELL-WEIGHED EXPECTATIONS, well-founded, 296. 24.
WELL-Wishes, good wishes, 121. 4.
WHEEL, used in allusion to “Fortune's wheel" and the vicissitudes of

human affairs, as the WHEEL OF THINGS, 217. pen.; THAT WHEEL MOVED
BY THE HAND OF GOD, 31. 15;-used also in allusion to the Ptolemaic
astronomy and the revolutions of the heavenly bodies, as THE GREAT

WHEEL OF THE CHURCH, 13. ult.; THE WHEEL OF SUCH INCLINATIONS,
WHEEL (verb), to turn, 93. 17.
WHICH, used for who, 77. 9.; omitted (?), 309. 12.
WHINE, to complain, 314. 12.
WHISPERINGLY CALUMNIATE, Cunningly, timidly, 309. 7.
WHISPERINGS, intimations, 127. pen. : WHISPERING PLACES, 214. 20.
WHORE OF BABYLON, name applied to the Church of Rome, but not by

Sir T. B., 12. 20.
WILDERNESS OF FORMS, countless shapes (?), distinguished from chaos,
WINDOWS OF TIME, openings through which one can see the histories of

byegone times, 202. 5.
WINGED THOUGHTS, furnished with wings, far-reaching, 203. 18.
WINGS (FLY WITHOUT), 178. 26 ; “sine pennis volare” (Plautus, Pan. iv.

75. ult.

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2. 49; Asin. i. 1. 80). The French have the same expression, "* vouloir

voler sans ailes,” to attempt impossibilities.
WINGY, soaring as if with wings; THOSE WINGY MYSTERIES IN DIVINITY,

17. 22; WINGY NATURE (of the soul), 53. 7.
WITCHCRAFT, WITCHES, 49, 50 (see Note on 50. 1). In one of the

“ Extracts" (vol. iv. p. 392, ed. Wilkin), Sir T. B. queries “whether
possession be not often mistaken for witchcraft, and many thought to be

bewitched which are indeed possessed ?”.
WITHAL, besides, the first word in a clause, 96. 4.
WITHOUT, outside, 57. 17.
WITS o’Work (TO SET His), to plan, endeavour, 188. 1.
WITTILY WICKED, ingeniously, 199. 7.
WITTY Pains, ingenious, 133. 22.
WOMB OF OUR MOTHER, called " that other world, the truest microcosm,”

63. 14, 20. (See also 133. 12.)

21.4

115. 25.

WONDER (BEYOND), alomst miraculous, 43. 10.
WORLD, duration (f the, 68. 19: 72. 27 (see Note): 190. 6: 230. 15: end

of, 132. pen. ; WORLD OF THE WOMB, 63. 14, 20: 133. 12; A HO:PITAL
WORÁ Out, to drive out gradually, 49. 29.
WORSER ITABITS, worse, 66. 29: 191. ult.
WRENCHES in Life, hardshiệs, 30. 13,
WRIT (verb), wrote, 42. 4.
YET (being NOT) WITHOUT Life, perhaps so soon, even then. 63. 24.
YVRONGNE (old French for IVROGNE), drunken, character of the German,

99. pen.
ZEALS, used for zealous men, abstract for concrete (see Note on p. 8, 1. 29':

INSOLENT ZEALS, 90 7; WiseR ZEALS, 19. 23. So “noble zeals,
Pseud. Epid. vii. 19, $ 4, p. 287, l. 23, ed. Bohn; "over-forward zeals,"

Jer. Taylor, Holy Dying, iv. 3, § 2.
ZENITH, in astronomy, the point in the celestial sphere immediately over

our heads; hence to ARISE TO THEIR ZENITH, to reach the height of

prosperity, 31. 17.
ZEŃO, the Stoic philosopher, 69. 8 : 221. 14: Zeno's KING, 153. 22: 171. 11,

allud.ng to the saying of the Stoics, that the wise man was a king.
2)DIACAL Signs, the twelve signs of the Zodiac, 228. 9.
*ZOILISM, a hypercritical d'isposition, from the carping critic, Zoilus,

186. 26.
ZOROASTER, the Persian lawgiver, mentioned, 42. 3.

The following words and references are to be added :-
ASSUEFACTION, Sir T. B.'s Works, vol. ii. p. 279, 1. 7, ed. Bohn.
COLLATERAL LAPSES, 187. 19.
COMPAGE, Works, ii. 214. I. penult.
CONTENT, 193. 18: 218. 29.
CONTRARÍLÝ, 130 21.
DEATH'S Heads, skulls, 210. 18, pen.
DDG-STAR, 207. 15.
ESSENCE, 77. 24.
EXEMPLAR, 179. 8.
EXTENUATE, 130. 26.
FACULTY, 48. 11.
FONT (baptismal), 7. 11.
HOLD UP WITH, 146. 6.
LAY AUDITORS, 236. 7.
LEGION, 81. 17.
PERSIST, to stand, Works, ii. 279, 16.
PHALARIS His Bull, Works, ii. 281, 28.
PIECE, 4. 6.
SIN (MAN OF), 12. 19.
SOBÈR ACTIONS, 142, 19 : DEPARTURE, 142. 22: SENSES, 142. 25.

LONDON : R. CLAY, SONS, AND TAYLOR, PRINTERS.

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UNIFORMLY printed in 18mo, with Vignette Titles by J. E. MILLAIS,
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THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF THE BEST SONGS

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