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pardon'd

II.

The following is a list of the variations that have been
noticed in two copies of ed. 1645 (called respectively
D and E) :-
THIS ED.
ED. '45.
D.

E.
P. 5. 1. 20. Pref. Thomas

Tho.
8.
21.
P. 3. 1. 8. whereon

whereupon
12. 27
9. 10.

patrun'd
14. 3.

7.
leave

have
29. I 2.

33. 19.
impregnate

impregnant
34. 15.
41. 4. yea

yet
35. 21.
42. antep. Israelites

Israelite
45. 10. 57.

6.
the full

that full
48. 14.

61. 22.
Genovose

Genovese
49. 21. 63. 16.
time represents

times present represent 54. 3.

70. 7.
hold on

hold one
55.

71. pen.
thoroughly

throughly
60. 2.

79.
7.
that is

there is
60. 17.
79. pen. may

must
61. 20.
but those

but that those
65. 30.
88. 1. neatest

nearest
67. 9.
90. 1. precedes

proceeds
68.
92. II. mauh

much
103. 21. to a contemplative by a contemplative
III. 21. and with joy

that with joy
83. 14.
should say

should
102.

her own 106. 22.

[ocr errors]

81. 17.

29. 75. 18.

81. pen.

113. ult.

2.

his own

141. 14.

148. 13.

against passion against reason 107 3. 149. 3. absolution

general absolution 107. 150. 3. otherwise

otherwise of myself 108. 14. 151. 3. circumscribed

not circumscribed 109. 27. 153 6. doth but

doth not III.

4. 155. 4. imagination coold coold imagination I12. 23. 157. 15. out

put out

25.

ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA.

P. 107, 1, 14. Keck thinks that by Nero Sir T, B. meant Tiberius, whose name was Nero too,” viz. Tiberius Claudius Nero Cæsar ; but perhaps it is more probable that he simply confused the two Emperors.

P. 119, 1. 28. at last, A, B, C, M; probably all the other old edd. have at least. This reading, and also the punctuation of p. 120. 11. 22, 23, are discussed in Notes and Qucries, 1880, vol. ii., pp. 245, 451.

P. 267. In the note on p. 63, 1. II, Sir T. B.'s lost or projected Dialogue between two unborn infants is called a “whimsical conceit,” and treated as a mere jeu d'esprit. It may have been so, and so Wilkin in his note on this passage appears to have taken it ; but upon further consideration it

more likely to have been a serious, philosophical attempt to “handsomely illustrate our ignorance of the next” world (Urn Burial, ch. 4) by the inability of the unborn infants to understand the condition of this.

seems

Χαλεπόν άνθρωπον όντα μη διαμαρτάνειν εν πολλοίς, τα μεν όλως αγνοήσαντα, •α δε κακώς κρίναντα, τα δε αμελέστερον γράψαντα. (Galen, De Compos. Medicam. sec. Loc. ii, 1. tom. xii. p. 535.)

M E D I C I.

The Eighth Edition,

Corrected and Amended.

WITH

ANNOTATIONS

Never before Published, Upon all the obscure passages therein.

ALSO

OBSERVATIONS By Sir Kenelm Digby,

Now newly added.

LONDON, Printed for R. Scot, T. Basset, J. Wright,

R. Chiswell, 1682.

TO THE READER.

CERTAINLY that man were greedy of Life, who should desire to live when all the world were at an end ; and he must needs be very impatient, who would repine at death in the society of all things that suffer under it. Had not almost every man suffered by the Press, or were not the tyranny thereof become universal, I had not wanted reason for complaint : but in times wherein I have lived to behold the highest perversion of that excellent invention, the name of his Majesty defamed, the Honour of Parliament depraved, the Writings of both depravedly, anticipatively, counterfeitly imprinted; complaints may seem ridiculous in private persons ; and men of my condition may be as incapable of affronts, as hopeless of their reparations. And truely, had not the duty I owe unto the importunity of friends, and the allegiance I must ever acknowledge unto truth, prevailed with me, the inactivity of my disposition might have made these sufferings continual, and time, that brings other things to light, should have satisfied me in the remedy of its oblivion. But because things evidently false are not onely printed, but many things of truth most falsly set forth, in

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