The Examinations of Anne Askew

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Oxford University Press, 1996 - 198 páginas
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In this vivid first-person narrative, Anne Askew (1521-1546), a member of the Reformed church, records her imprisonment for heresy and her interrogation by officials of church and state in the last days of Henry VIII. She represents herself arguing forcefully, learnedly, and wittingly with her accusers, continually demonstrating their theological errors and her own refusal to be the traditional silent woman in public debate on religion. As a spiritual autobiography, a historical document, and a carefully crafted polemic, this work gives new insight into Reformation politics and society in England. After Askew was burned at the stake in 1546, her work was immediately published by John Bale who wove his own historical commentary with her text to "elucidate" her role as a Protestant martyr. Askew's work also exists in several early editions without Bale's commentary, most importantly in John Foxe's Acts and Monuments (1563).

This volume includes two texts: the first edition of Askew's Examinations with Bale's Elucidation, and Foxe's edition uninterrupted version of her work. This book will have strong appeal for scholars and students of English Renaissance literature, Reformation history, and women's history.
 

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Índice

Foreword
ix
Selected Bibliography
xliii
Note on the Text
lviii
THE ExAMINATIONs
18
John Foxe Actes and Monuments 1563
163
APPENDIx I
193
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Sobre el autor (1996)


Elaine V. Beilin is Associate Professor of English at Framingham State College.

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