History of England: From the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles, 1713-1783, Volumen 3

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Página 250 - ... scheme, they were not discomposed, and only hastened to form themselves in line of battle. There had been some warm discussion as to which clan should obtain the honours of the right : it was claimed by the Macdonalds, and in prudence, but reluctantly, was yielded by the Camerons and Stuarts. Charles put himself at the head of the second line, which was close behind the first, and addressed them in these words: — "Follow me, gentlemen, and by the blessing of " God, I will this day make you...
Página 20 - I thank God that I have been enabled to come here this day — to perform my duty, and to speak on a subject which has so deeply impressed my mind. I am old and infirm — have one foot, more than one foot, in the grave — I am risen from my bed, to stand up in the cause of my country — perhaps never again to speak in this House.
Página 331 - ... as to excite the surprise and laughter of some country people on the road. Being admonished by his attendants he promised to take better care for the future, and accordingly in passing the next stream allowed the skirts to hang down and float upon the water. " Your enemies," said Kingsburgh, "call you a Pretender, but if " you be, I can tell you, you are the worst of your trade I ever . "saw!
Página 77 - Court occasioned the dangers which affected the public tranquillity ; yet the whole is charged to my account. Nor is this sufficient ; whatever was the conduct of England, I am equally arraigned. If we maintained ourselves in peace, and took no share in foreign transactions, we are reproached for tameness and pusillanimity. If, on the contrary, we interfered in the disputes, we are called Don Quixotes, and dupes to all the world.
Página 148 - Such a shameful degree of profligacy prevailed, that the retailers of this poisonous compound set up painted boards in public, inviting people to be drunk for the small expense of one penny ; assuring them they might be dead drunk for two-pence, and have straw for nothing.
Página 23 - Street * * * * was called in the morning, and was asleep as soon as his head touched the pillow, for I have frequently known him snore ere they had drawn his curtains, now never sleeps above an hour without waking ; and he, who at dinner always forgot he was Minister, and was more gay and thoughtless than all his company, now sits without speaking, and with his eyes fixed for an hour together.
Página 144 - Britain ? It is now too apparent, that this great, this powerful, this formidable kingdom, is considered only as, a province to. a despicable electorate ; and that, in consequence of a scheme formed long ago, and invariably pursued, these troops are hired only to drain this unhappy nation of its money.
Página 178 - Charles the second, during his banishment, would have shared the last pistole in his pocket with his little family. But I have known this gentleman with two thousand Louis-d'ors in his strong box pretend he was in great distress, and borrow money from a lady in Paris, who was not in affluent circumstances. His most faithful servants, who had closely attended him in all his difficulties, were ill rewarded.
Página 57 - For it is common with the Spaniards to fall down upon the decks when they see a broadside preparing, and to continue in that posture till it is given ; after which they rise again and, presuming the danger to be for some time over, work their guns and fire with great briskness till another broadside is ready ; but the firing gun by gun in the manner directed by the Commodore rendered this practice of theirs impossible.
Página 342 - Call it vanity, if you please, and possibly it was so ; but my great object was to make every man I met with like me, and every woman love me I often succeeded ; but why ? By taking great pains...

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