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tion, as well as the numberless mixtures of modern nations that have over-run these kingdoms, from time to time, since the beginning, which would naturally produce all the causes for the changes in languages, accounted for before; and yet their parentage is manifest, even now; and a discovery arises from this, which corroborates thofe great truths related in Holy Writ, concerning the first migrations, after the flood of Noah, as delivered by Moses and the prophets.

In the first number, the ah and yeck are as easy transitions from aon, as the Greek etc, or Latin unus. The number two is expressed the very fame way with the original, in both Persia and Bengal. And, as to the three, in the Magogian tri, the r is funk in both the Persian and Bengalian tongues, and the initial t, changed to an^ in the Persian \ otherwise they would be the fame. The four is the fame in all, with a small allowance for the change, merely from pronunciation: the ch, or c dotted, in the Magogian^ is always pronounced like the Greek #, or English k; whereas, the Persians and Indians pronounce them as we do in chain) charity, or the like. The five, being the fame in both, and called paunch, seems to be under the fame mutilation with the Weljh pymp, and the Greek pente; both which are accounted for already. The fix, or Magogian Jhe, has an easy transition into the Bengalian choe and the Persiansiejh. The number seven, called saat in Bengals and hast in Perjia^ are certainly the Magogian Jheaghd. And the ocht, eight, is the fame, only with the change of the initial o into a, adding which makes aught in Bengal; and the hajht of Perjia differs only

in in a vitiated pronunciation. As for the nine, it suffers but little alteration, the initial being preserved in both countries; for the mi is only changed to noe in one, and no in the other; and the Latins did the fame in their novem, as did the Greeks in their ivveot. Number ten, deic, or deg, varies into does in Bengal, and da in Persia; the initial is preserved, and the alteration but slight. Now, in the Magogian, when they reiterate the units with the tens, they fay yndeg for aondeg, eleven; and so on of the rest, to twenty; but the Bengalians have droped the es in does, ten, and changed the do into ro, adding the units to it, in succession, up to twenty; whereas the Per/ians keep their da, ten,. unchanged with the units, to express every number, from ten to twenty; and for this last, they both fay beeft' and beese, which should be spelt with one /, instead of the ee, and by taking the original fy instead of b, they would be fijle and Jijse, the very offspring of the Magogian Jighid.

As to the other four, viz. the Turki/b, Hebrew, Mallays and Chinese, there is not much to be observed concerning them, as there is no manner of agreement with the Magogian, except that the Hebrews express the numbers fix and seven, by the names Jifa and Jibha, which seem to have some affinity to the original of the European names; and in the Mallays, for two and three, they fay duo and tigo, which are also probably related to the Magogian; in every other respect, the names of all the four are as different as can be imagined.

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Observations on the names of the numbers of the American

Indians.

We fee by the table, that the five nations, p. 345, which are included in the two first columns, use the fame names, in general, to their numbers; and, as I have faid before, have particular appellations for the units, and add these units to the tens, according as they are multiplied, to form the increasing numbers: but the reason why the Mohawks are in a column by themselves is, because they differ from the other four in the numbers, eight, nine, ten, who use the fame names exactly in their several tribes.

The fVanats,. who are not of the fame nations, come very near them, having only a trifling change of letters, and having no absolute difference from the sour nations, but in the number nine, which will be easily discerned in attending to the table, and making the necessary allowance for their variations, and which are required, even in the dialects of the fame language, every where. And, indeed, in considering some of these numbers, it is not difficult to make out three, which seem to have some relation to those of Europe: for example, the cajeary, for sour, is near the Magogian cathair. The wijk, five, is like the cuig\ and the towachfon, twenty, approaches the German zwantzig; this is something very particular, and the more so, as they signify the fame numbers in both parts of the world.

The Shawanosse and Delawares are very different from the foregoing, and, indeed, from one another, except that the latter has koti for one, which has some affinity to the hujkot of the five nations, and the usscot of the Wanats.

Now, Now, by the agreement between the five nations, in what regards their numbers, it is, I think, very clear, that their alliance must be of very ancient standing; and that the Wanats were either formerly adherents to them, or else were always theix very near neighbours; for, their being a strong and powerful people, whilst so many tribes were in perpetual alliance, offensive and defensive, they could not be so. subject to the vicissitudes that other single nations must undergo, of being driven up and down, and depopulated by their wars with one another, and, consequently^ not forced to forget their language, especially their nwneral names, as thofe scattered tribes have manifestly been.

There is, however, another very striking circumstance, in a close affinity, between the names of some of the numbers of the Delawares and thofe of the Poles and. Ruffians i the first of these, in adding the units to the tens, fay nisha. nagiiy, twenty; naha naghky, thirty; nehwa naghky, forty y and so on, using the last to signify ten, and the first the. number of tens: and the Poles, for eleven, fay ieden nasties for twelve, dwa nafcie, and so on till they come to twenty;. so the Rujfftans fay for these fame numhers, udi naz&t, twa. nazet, &c. Again,. the Delawares. fay koti puchky, for one. hundred; and the Poles fay puczsets, for five hundred.. Now, if chance has produced these surprizing agreements,. in nations so remote, they are very curious, at least; but,. I am inclined to think, there is too close an affinity between them, being used for the very fame numbers in each of these nations, to be ascribed to any accidental cause, and that their origin was from the fame source, howeyer remote their situation. I Also

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