An Essay on the History of the English Government and Constitution from the Reign of Henry VII to the Present Time ...

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1865 - 300 páginas

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Página iii - Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks: methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full midday beam...
Página 80 - That it is the right of the subject to petition the king, and all commitments and prosecutions for such petitioning are illegal.
Página 69 - And whereas the Laws of England are the birthright of the people thereof, and all the Kings and Queens, who shall ascend the Throne of this realm, ought to administer the Government of the same according to the said laws, and all their officers and ministers ought to serve them respectively according to the same...
Página 35 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Página 172 - It were good therefore that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself; which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly, and by degrees scarce to be perceived.
Página 36 - ... or done in parliament, the same is to be showed to the king, by the advice and assent of all the Commons assembled in parliament, before the king give credence to any private information.
Página 140 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants: it is always unknown ; it is different in different men; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst, it is every vice, folly, and passion to which human nature is liable.
Página 204 - Ye cannot make us now less capable, less knowing, less eagerly pursuing of the truth, unless ye first make yourselves, that made us so, less the lovers, less the founders of our true liberty. We can grow ignorant again, brutish, formal, and slavish, as ye found us ; but you then must first become that which ye cannot be, oppressive, arbitrary, and tyrannous, as they were from whom ye have freed us.
Página 104 - Party is a body of men united, for promoting by their joint endeavours the national interest, upon some particular principle in which they are all agreed.
Página 276 - ... it may be that I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of good- will in the abodes of those whose lot it is to labour, and to earn their daily bread by the sweat of their brow, when they shall recruit their exhausted strength with abundant and untaxed food, the sweeter because it is no longer leavened with a sense of injustice.

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