German prose writing

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Trübner & Company, 1882 - 219 páginas
 

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Índice

The son of Croesus
9
Tullus Hostilius and the Albans
10
Romulus and Remus
11
Agesilaus J2 25 Hercules and Cacus
12
Friendship
13
Maximin and the Battle of the Lake
14
Lewis to Charles
15
The defence of Kars
16
The community of the ancient Germans
17
The formation of the Bengal army
18
Lord Chesterfield and his son
19
Sir Humphry Davy and the brother philosopher
20
The defence of Arrah
21
Horatius and his sister
22
The Romans andGermans
23
Death of Sir John Moore
24
The Austrian officer
25
The cranes of Ibicus
26
Macbeth
27
Alfred King of England
28
The farewell
29
Ferdinando Alvarez de Toledo
30
The gardener and his ass
31
Sir Isaac Newton
32
Timur and Codscha
33
The prayer of the poor woman
34
Alexander von Humboldt
35
Livingstone in Africa
36
Kosciuskos horse
37
The principality of Herat
38
A family of heroes
39
Theodosius and Pulcheria
40
Hannibals address to his soldiers
41
Wallensteins humiliation before Stralsund
42
Introduction of rice into America
43
The Maori
44
A daring escape
45
Greece
46
Mrs Pendarves to her sister Mrs Ann Granville
47
Gustavus Adolphus in the Thirty Years war
48
AngloSaxon
49
Eugenes victory over the Turks at Zenta
50
William learns the tongue of his subjects
51
Rivalry between two Queens
52
Paris is well worth a mass
53
The death of Gustavus Adolphus
54
The miser in hell
55
A memorial by Leibnitz
56
How Edmund Stone taught himself mathematics
57
The Black Princes address to his warriors
58
How Walter Scott became the first in his class
59
The battle of life
60
Arminius and his romanized brother
61
Riches and knowledge
62
Peasants amusement
71
Letter relating to the election at Rugby
72
Arabia the Happy
73
The trial by peers
74
The last days of Pompeii
75
Rolla to the Peruvians
76
Speech for repealing the Act called the Jew Bill in 1753
77
The Canadian militia
78
Don Ventura Rodriguez
79
Poor Jack
80
Queen Judith
81
Brother and sister
82
Warwicks message
83
Napoleon I and England
84
King William and his English subjects
85
Peter the Great as a carpenter
86
The battle of Gravelotte
87
The family of Bedford
88
The law of sacrifice
89
The genius of Milton
90
The Franks and their name
91
Speech on the abolition of the slavetrade
92
Napoleons power on the decline
93
The monuments of the benefactors of mankind
94
Voltaire and Frederick the Great
95
The government of small States
96
The spirit of the times
97
The heart and the head in poetry
98
Vanity Fair
99
The battle of Cressy
100
Thomas Parnell
101
The great fire of London
102
FOURTH CLASS 1 Hampton Court Palace
103
King Charles II and Sir Henry Lee
104
Napoleon and Portugal
106
Canning
107
Palmerstons maiden speech in defending the attack on Copen hagen 1807
109
The Polish revolution in 1830
110
The opium war in China
112
The invasion of Afghanistan by the English 1838
113
Mehemet Ali of Egypt
115
Turkey in the hands of Russia
117
The first strained relations between England and Russia
118
The crisis in the Eastern question
120
Englands first step to warlike action
123
The Crimean war
125
Introduction
131
Some plans to be used for special classes of essays
140
Prose reproduction from memory of short narrative poems
145
THIRD CLASS
153
When the Lord punishes men cry
159
What has a youth to consider when choosing a profession?
165
Explain the influence public speeches had on the ancient Greeks
172

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Página 94 - The first creature of God, in the works of the days, was the light of the sense; the last was the light of reason; and his sabbath work ever since is the illumination of his Spirit. First he breathed light upon the face of the matter or chaos, then he breathed light into the face of man, and still he breatheth and inspireth light into the face of his chosen.
Página 95 - Sabbath work ever since is the illumination of his Spirit. First he breathed light upon the face of the matter, or chaos; then he breathed light into the face of man; and still he breatheth and inspireth light into the face of his chosen. The poet...
Página 73 - My brave associates — partners of my toil, my feelings and my fame ! — can Rolla's words add vigour to the virtuous energies which inspire your hearts? No— —YOU have judged as I have, the foulness of the crafty plea by which these bold invaders would delude you...
Página 68 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is scarcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices ; and obliging her detractors...
Página 56 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.
Página 69 - Her vigour, her constancy, her magnanimity, her penetration, vigilance, address, are allowed to merit the highest praises, and appear not to have been surpassed by any person that ever filled a throne: a conduct less rigorous, less imperious, more sincere, more indulgent to her people, would have been requisite to form a perfect character. By the force of her mind, she controlled all her more active and stronger qualities, and prevented them from running into excess : her heroism was exempt from...
Página 85 - It is now the fashion to place the golden age of England in times when noblemen were destitute of comforts, the want of which would be intolerable to a modern footman; when farmers and shopkeepers breakfasted on loaves, the very sight of which would raise a riot in a modern workhouse...
Página 89 - If we listen to the voice of reason and duty, and pursue this night the line of conduct which they prescribe, some of us may live to see a reverse of that picture from which we now turn our eyes with shame and regret. We may live to behold the natives of Africa engaged in the calm occupations of industry, in the pursuits of a just and legitimate commerce. We may behold the beams of science and philosophy breaking in upon their land,* which at some happy period in still later times may blaze with...
Página 95 - It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below; but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors and wanderings and mists and tempests in the vale below; so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
Página 82 - I would have run to him, only I was a coward in the presence of such a mob— would have embraced him, only, he being an Englishman, I did not know how he would receive me; so I did what cowardice and false pride suggested was the best thing — walked deliberately to him, took off my hat, and said: 'Dr Livingstone, I presume?

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