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ANECDOTES OF IN

perilous search for the discovery of a north When every limb is pain, or deadlier yet,
west passage.
Miss Porden is the first

When those chilled limbs the sense of pain forwho has treated this subject in a poeti- || Awful it is to gaze on shoreless seas,

get; cal way; a subject well calculated for the

But more to view those restless billows freeze enthusiasm of poetry: she excels in de. One solid plain, or wben like mountains piled, scription, and here a wide field is opened || Whole leagues in length, of forms sublimely for that her peculiar forte.

wild, Nor has she seized the pencil at random; || In dreadful war the floating icebergs rosh, it is not mere fancy that has guided her

Horrent with trees that kindle as they crush ;

The flickering compass points with fitful force, pictorial and poetical delineations; she

And pot a star in heaven directs your course, has taken good care to inform herself mi- || But the broad sun through all the endless day, putely and correctly of those incidents | Wheels changeless round, sole beacon of your whicb she has clothed in such charıning way; colours.

Or through a night more dreadful, doomed to The following kind of invocation at the

Unknowing where, and hopeless of a home. commencement of the Poem is very beauti

Dense fogs, dark floating on the frozen tide, ful:

Veil the clear stars i hat yet might be your guide; “ Sail, sail, adventurous harks! go fearless fortb, || 'The moon shines glorious in' a cloudless sky."

And vaiply conscious that for weeks on high, Storm on his glacier seat the misty north, Give to mankind the inhospitable zone,

This last line alludes to the phenoinenon And Britain's trident plant in seas anknown.

of the arctic moon, which in the middle Go! sure, wherever science fills the mind,

of the polar night, or winter, shines for a Or grief for man long severed from his kind, That anxio is nations watch the changing grles, fortnight together. And prayers and blessings swell your flagging sails.”

THE BIRTH OF THE BUTTERFLY. And you, aspiring youths! beroic hand! Who leave, by science led, your native land; FROM MR. TAYLOR'S Undaunted steer where none have mark'd the

way,
Whom danger damps dot, nor whom toils dismay. When, bursting forth to life and light,

The offspring of enraptured May,
You, no green islands of the West invite,
No dangerous Capua, ourse of soft delight;

The butterfly, on pinions bright,

Launched in full splendor on the day.
No paradise where yet mankind is pure,
No flowery fields or balmy gales allure.

Unconscious of a mother's care, Fatigue and frost, and storins, and death, you No infant wretchedness it knew; brave,

But, as she felt the vernal air, Where none are near, to witness or to save." . At once to full perfection grew.

Her slender form, etherial light, " Fear not, while months of dreary darkness

Her velvet textured wings unfold, roll,

With all the rainbow's colours bright, To stand self-centred on the attractive pole;

And dropt with spots of buroish'd gold. Or find some gull, steep, turbulent, and dark, Trembling awhile with joy she stood, Earth's mighty mouth suck in the struggling

And felt the sun's enlivening ray, bark;

Drank from the skies the vital flood, Fear not, the victims of magnetic force,

And wondered at ber plumage gay. To hang arrested in your midmost course; And balanc'd oft her broidered wings, Yoor prows drawn downward and your sterus Thro' fields of air prepared to sail; in air,

Then on lier ventrous journey springs, To waste with cold, and grief, and famine, there : And floats along the rising gale. Strange fancies these—but real ills are near,

Go, child of pleasure, range the fieldsco Not cloth'd in all the picturesque of fear,

Taste all the joys that spring can give Which makes its wild distortions doubly drear.

Partake what bounteous summer yields,
Nor like the rush of fight, when burning zeal

Aud live while yet 'tis thine to live.
Forbids the heart to quail, the limbs to feel-
Long patient suffering, when the frozen air Go sip the rose's fragrant dew-
Seems almost solid, and the painful glare

The lily's lionied cup explore-
Of endless snow destroys the dazzled sight; From flower to flower the search reuew,
When fatal slumber comes with dreadful weight; And rifle all the woodbipe's store,

SECTS.”

TERRORS THAT AWAIT THB ADVENTURRRS.

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And let me trace thy vagrant flight,

Thy moments, too, of short repose : And mark thee when, with fresh delight,

Thy golden pinions ope and close. Bilt hark! while I thus musing stand,

Pours on the gale an airy note, And breathing from a viewless band,

Soft silvery tones around me float. They cease-but still a voice I hear,

A whispered voice of hope and joyThy hour of rest approaches near,

Prepare thee, mortal! thou must die! Yet start not! on thy closing eyes

Another day shall still unfold;
A sun of milder radiance rise,

A happier age of joys unfold.
Sball the poor worm that shocks thy sight,

The bumblest form in nature's train,
Thus rise in new-born lustre bright,

And yet the emblem teach in vain
Ab! where were once her golden eyes,

Her glitt'ring wings of purple pride ?
Conceal'd beneath a rude disguise!

A shapeless mass to earth allied. Like thee, the helpless reptile lived,

Like thee she toiled, like thee she sprin; Like tbine, her closing hour arrived,

Her labours ceased, ber web was done. And shalt thou, number'd with the dead,

No happier state of being know? And shall no future sorrow shed,

On thee a beam of brigbter glow?
Is this the bound of Power Disine,

To animate an insect frame?
Or shall not he who monlded thine,

Wake at his will the vital flame ?
Go, mortal! in thy reptile state,

Enough to know to thee is given; Go, and the joyful truth relate, Frail child of earth, bright heir of heaven!

ANONYMOUS.

'Tis spring tbat now visits the plain,

The east brightens wide with the dawn; See Flora, the head of her train,

In the midst of the dance on the lawn. All hail, thou fair emblem of love!

That has in the superlative state, Clad in green the umbrageous grove,

And with gladness the earth doth elate. The shepherds their flocks now release

At the rise of the lark from her nest; They browse the bigh steep in calm peace,

For envy's unknown to their breast. The lambs sport around the green mead,

To Pallas's soft flowing strains; And Pan, with his musical reed,

Of spring the existence proclaims. Aurora breaks forth from the skies,

In splendour amazingly bright; The cock bids the peasants arise,

And to labour the rastics invite: The lark from her pillow ascends,

Serenades the renewal of light;
To be sky she high towering bends,

And is enveloped now from sight.
The thrush hails the morning's first beam,

Swells her throat with the music of love;
And the notes of the birds near the stream,

Resounds from the dell through the grove. All the feather'd musicians of spring,

The delights of the morning enjoy; May they to maturity bring,

And no evil their broodlings annoy. New beauties emerge from the lands,

The profusions of Flora behold! How the tulip her colour's expands,

And lily of wbite and of gold. The primrose adoros the gay mead,

And the violet appears in the dale; O'er the pasture the cowslips are spread,

To lavish their sweets on the gale. The rose, royal queen of perfume,

Its beauteous vermilion displays; And the suckle and lilac in bloom,

Deserve a just tribute of praise. Tbe bless'd renovation enjoy

In the sylvan secluded retreat; For grandeur your peace

will

annoyContent's not in luxury's seat. But, hark! at the sound of the bells

From the hamlet that stands near the grove; 'Tis there the young Clerimont dwells,

Who's just wedded to Delia his love.
Ye shepherds your garlands prepare;

Convene all your musical powers;
Ye belles to the hamlet declare,
That mirth the most jovial is ours.

SANGRADO.

ORIGINAL POETRY.

SPRING,--A PASTORAL POEM. Stern winter no longer prevails,

With its raging ferocity wild; The snow fills no longer the vales,

But the scene is all placid and mild; The wiuds all their fury assuage,

The tempest's loud blast is no more, No longer shall youth and old age

The raging of winter deplore.

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