Teen Life in Asia

Portada
Judith J. Slater
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - 290 páginas

Are teenagers in Tokyo more or less mature than teens in Brooklyn? What do Chinese teens do for weekend recreation? What do they value and care about? This volume shows that the lives of teens in prosperous and westernized Asian countries have much in common with those of American teens. Obtaining a good education is paramount, and Asian interests and tastes--in pop culture and sports, for example--are in sync with their American counterparts.

In poorer and politically restricted Asian nations, teen life and opportunities are more restricted, however. Greater focus and energy is given to helping the family survive. Yet it is the ancient cultural and religious traditions in Asian life that constitute the fundamental difference between American and Asian teens. This book is an insightful and sweeping introduction to the Asian teen experience--from a typical day to participation in religious ceremonies--in 15 countries.

 

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Índice

Introduction
1
China
19
Hong Kong
35
India
51
Indonesia
69
Japan
87
Mongolia
113
Nepal
131
Philippines
169
Singapore
191
South Korea
205
Taiwan
223
Thailand
243
Vietnam
267
Index
285
Página de créditos

North Korea
153

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Página viii - Complicating this new, positive conceptualization of the character of youth as resources for the healthy development of self, families, and communities was an antithetical theoretical approach to the nature and development of young people. Dating within science to, at least, the publication in 1904 of G. Stanley Hall's twovolume work on adolescence, youth have been characterized by a deficit view, one that conceptualizes their behaviors as deviations from normative development. Understanding such...
Página vii - ... youth possess the capacity for positive development. This vision for and vocabulary about youth has evolved over the course of a scientifically arduous path. Complicating this new, positive conceptualization of the character of youth as resources for the healthy development of self, families, and communities was an antithetical theoretical approach to the nature and development of young people. Dating within science to, at least, the publication in 1904 of G. Stanley Hall's...
Página vii - FOREWORD: TOWARD A WORLD OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT In these early years of the twenty-first century a new vision and vocabulary for discussing young people has emerged. Propelled by the increasingly more collaborative contributions of scholars, practitioners, advocates, and policy makers, youth are viewed as resources to be developed. The new vocabulary is legitimated by scholarly efforts at advancing what are termed "developmental systems theories." These models emphasize the plasticity of human...
Página viii - To attain such a world, all people must begin by appreciating the diversity of young people and their cultures and that, through such diversity, the world possesses multiple, potentially productive paths to human well-being and accomplishment. Readers of the Teen Life around the World series will be rewarded with just this information. Ultimately, we must all continue to educate ourselves about the best means available to promote enhanced life chances among all of the...
Página ix - ... seems clear. Applied developmental scientists must continue to educate themselves about the best means available to promote (through integrating the developmental system) enhanced life chances among all individuals and families, but especially among those whose potential for positive contributions to civil society is most in danger of being wasted (Dryfoos, 1990, 1998; Hamburg, 1992; Lerner, 2002b; Lerner et al., 1999; Schorr, 1988, 1997).

Referencias a este libro

Teens in Vietnam
Gregory Nicolai
Vista previa restringida - 2007

Sobre el autor (2004)

JUDITH J. SLATER is Associate Professor at Florida International University, Miami. She specializes in curriculum theory, evaluation, organizational analysis, and women in higher education.

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