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Appendix, containing Baron's imitation of Milton's early poems, Lauder's interpolations, additions, and correc

tions.

Mr. T. does not find himself qualified to contradict Aubrey's ftory of Milton's whipping, though he certainly was expelled, having kept his terms; but he difcredits his interpolation of the prayer in the Eicon Bafilike. In like manner he has difcriminated the fpurious writings aferibed to Milton. He has vindicated his mortal remains from the profanation offered by indecent curiofity to thofe of a younger female. The late George Steevens, in his MS. notes on the narrative of this difinteriment, and the poftfcript annex ed to it, againfi nine fubfiantial reafons in the St. James's Chronicle, has intimated that the difinterred corpfe was fuppofed to be that of a female, and that the minutefi examination of the fragments could not difprove, if it did not confirm, the fuppofition." The infcribed ftone laid over Milton in the chancel of Cripplegate church had been long fince removed, nor were his remains honoured by any other memorial there till the year 1793, when, by the munificence of the late Mr. Whitbread, an animated marble butt, the fculpture of Bacon, under which is a plain tablet recording the dates of the poet's birth and death, and of his father's deccafe, was erected in the middle aile. A new copy of Fajthorne's portrait (in crayons) of Milton at the age of 62, by an ingenious young artifi (T. Simplon), from the original in the poffeflion of William Baker, efq. from Riehardfon and Tonfon, is prefixed to this life. Peck was guilty of a flameful impofition on the publick in palming on them the portrait prefixed to his "New Memoirs of Milton, 1740."

Paradife Lofi went through two editions in its author's life-time but, fince his death, not less than 45 editions are here cnumerated, including Bp. Newton's, Mr. Hayley's, and the prefent. It is included in Milton's poetical works, in 3 vols. folio, with an excellent life by Mr. Hayley, 1794. This magnificent edition does honour to the tatie and abilities of thofe

who were engaged in the production of it. It displays every elegance of typographical excution, and is accompanied with most beautiful engravings from the defigns of Weltall. It is a

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monument, indeed, worthy of HIM
whofe works entitle him to that fuper-
eminence among the poets of his coun-
try which he has fo happily affigned to
his own glorious "ile among the
fea-girt" domains of Neptune.
"The greatest and the best of all domains.”
COMUS, V. 28.
Ten of these editions were printed at
Glafgow and Edinburgh; and, at the
latter place," the firft tix books of Pa-
radife Loft, rendering into grammatical
confiruction, the words of the text be-
ing arranged at the bottom of each
page, in the fame natural order with
the conceptions of the mind, and the
elliptis properly fupplied, without any
alteration in the diction of the poem.
By the late James Buchanan, author
of the British Grammar. The MS.
was left with Dr. James Robertfon,
profellor of Hebrew, who has publish-
ed it for the benefit of the author's wi-
dow, Edinburgh, 1773," 8vo*. In
our vol. XLIX. p. 191, is mentioned a
Greek tranflation of Paradife Loft, by
Thomas Denny, a literary pedant, par-
ticularly killed in Greek, &c. &c. One
of our friends recollects being accofied,
in walking out of Cambridge with a
findent there about 1753 or 1754, by a
middle-fized and aged man, in his own
hair and grave cloaths, in a fuppliant
tone for relief, with a Greek fentence
or two, purporting that "a fool might
fometimes utter a wife faying," but no
farther converfation palled.

Milton's Paradife Loft, and the language it was written in, were highly admired by Abbate Salvini, of Florence, whofe tranflation of it into Italian has never yet feen the light.

Our limits do not permit us to enter into a review of the notes fubjoined to this edition, and principally made up of thofe of Newton, Pearce, Richardfon, and Warion. Thole of Bentley are jatily characterized in the preface, and that in particular on the two cʊnclading lines, reprobated by a concurrence of criticks. Perhaps we thall

not indeed be fevere if we affert that a

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April.... While on an expedition to Candahar, the King of Cabul. Timur Shah Abdalla poffeffed great dominions, extending Westward to the neighbourhood of the city of Terfhith, including Peithore, Ghizni, Gaur, Seiftan, and Korafan, a tract of not less than 650 miles in length. Ahmed Abdalla, the father of the above, and founder of Candahar, was originally the chief of an Afghan tribe, named Abdal (whence the name Abdalli), who Stripped of his country by Nadir Shah, and compelled to join the Perfian army, 1739. On the death of Nadir, he fuddenly appeared among his former fubjects, and erected for himself a confiderable kingdom in the Eaftern part of Perfia, adding to it most of the provinces to the Weft of the Indus, which had been ceded by the Mogul

was

Nadir Shah. Several chiefs who compofed Zemaun Shah's army at the time of his entering Hindoftan, and who were active in the fubfeqnent undertaking againit the Seiks at Lahore, had aflembled at Candahar, for the porpofe of affitting in a revolution faid to be in agitation in that country. The King, fome mouths prior to Iris death, concluded a treaty, offensive and defenfive, with the Seik Government.

June... In Egypt, of the plague, aged 26, Mr. Samuel Hare, fu go 1.

Aug 24. In the Weft Indies, Capt. Gordon Maxwell, of dhe i battalion of the both regiment, brother of Capt. Maxwell, who fo gallantly diftinguifhed himself in cutting out La Chevrette from Brea harbour. He was highly honoured and beloved by his brother officers. On hearing of his death, they addrelfed the following letter to the printer of the Jamaica Mercury, in teftimony of their regret and efteem: "Sir, It is with deep concern that the officers of his Majefty's first battalion of the 60th regiment, ftationed at Martha Brae and Fatmouth, have, by the laft paft, heard of the unfortunate death of their much-lamented friend and brother-officer, Capt. Gordon Maxwell, efq. of the faid regiment. In his lofs they have to regret the foldier, the friend, and the man of honour. This gentleman was nearly allied to the prefent Duchefs of Gordon; and, in the execution of fome part of his duty, fell a facrifice to the fever of this country, aged only 16 years, traty deferving a better fate."

Sept. 30. On his paffage to Baltimore, for the recovery of his health, Dr. George Guild, of the island of Tobago.

08..... At Malta, on his return from Egypt for the recovery of his health, Lieut. John Stewart, of the 2d battalion Royals.

1. At St. Mary's, Jamaica, Mr. James Stormonth, fargeon.

5. At Tobago, Thomas Chalmers, efq. collector of the customs there.

15. At Good Hope, Trelawny parish, Jamaica, Dr. Adam Willis; who, during

a refidence of 18 years on that ifland, had enjoyed uninterrupted good health. While travelling in the difcharge of his profef.. fional duties, his carriage was overturned, and he was fo much bruised and hurt as to caufe his death in a few hours.

24. AtJamaica, of the yellow fever, Wm. Kilgour, M. D. furgeon of the 65th foot.

Nov. 18. At Maidilo e, in his 79th year, William Hawkins, efq. formerly furgeon of the Charter houfe in London; in which office he fucceeded his father, Mr. Mark H,

19. At Nice, Jofeph de Beauchamp; born at Vezoul in 1732; entered, 1767, into the order of Bernardines, and took his departure for Afia in 1781, with his uncle, who was appointed bifhop of BabyIon. In this his fift voyage he teered his courfe along the Tigris and Euphrates, fron Diarbeker to the Perfin Galph. He, mude a collection of medals, infcriptions, and defigns of the menuments of Antient B bylon, as well as Arab c manufcripts, which he prefented to the Abbé Barthele my. In 1787 he made a fecond voyage upon the Cafpian Sea. He was beaten by robbers, fays Citizen Lalande, and contracted a fever, which lafted 18 months; but it did not prevent him from continuing his voyage. It was in the cou.fe of this voyage that he obferved the most important eclipfe of the moon of which the hif tory of aftronomy preferves any remembrance. I 1795 he made a third voyage, and, through the means of Citizen Volney, he was appointed conful at Mafcate, in Arabia; at which place, however, he never arrived, being taken by the English, with whom he remained three years a captive. The peace having at length given him his liberty, he arrived fick at Nice, where he died at the moment when the First Conful had appointed him commiffary-general at Lisbon. He was one of thofe few men of whom it may be faid, that he well employed the fhort space of his life. Beauchamp poffeffed every ípecies of merit and of knowledge. The duties of religion were not neglected by this philofopher; and the congregation of the Propaganda at Rome often teftified how much they were fatiffied with his apoftolic zeal.

Lately, in India, Onflow Grofe, efq. cap. tain of the pioneer corps on the Madras eftablishment, and youngest fou of the late Francis G. efq. F. A. S.

At Calcutta, Capt. Jofeph Stokoe, of the engineers.

On his paffage from India, Lieutenantcol. Tolfrey.

At Penang. Lieut. Doham, of the Dedalus; and Lieut. Hayley, of the Braave. At fea, Lieut. Gordon, and Ensign Nevill, of the 12th foot.

At Madras, Major Robert Turing, fecretary to the Government in the military department. A numerous affemblage attend

ed

Appendix, containing Baron's imitation of Milton's early poems, Lauder's interpolations, additions, and corrections.

Mr. T. does not find himself qualified to contradict Aubrey's ftory of Milton's whipping, though he certainly was expelled, having kept his terms; but he difcredits his interpolation of the prayer in the Eicon Bafilike. In like manner he has difcriminated the fpurious writings aferibed to Milton. He has vindicated his mortal remains from the profanation offered by indecent curiofity to thofe of a younger female. The late George Steevens, in his MS. notes on the narrative of this difinterment, and the poftfcript annexed to it, against nine fubfiantial reasons in the St. James's Chronicle, has intimated that the difinterred corpfe was fuppofed to be that of a female, and that the minuteft examination of the fragments could not difprove, if it did not confirm, the fuppofition." The infcribed ftone laid over Milton in the

chancel of Cripplegate church had been long fince removed, nor were his remains honoured by any other memorial there till the year 1793, when, by the munificence of the late Mr. Whitbread, au animated marble buti, the fculpture of Bacon, under which is a plain tablet recording the dates of the poet's birth and death, and of his father's deceafe, was erected in the middle aile. A new copy of Faj thorne's portrait (in crayons) of Milton at the age of 62, by an ingenious young artifi (T. Simplon), from the original in the poffeflion of William Baker, efq. from Riehardfon and Toufon, is prefixed to this life. Peck was guilty of a fameful impofition on the publick in palming on them the portrait prefixed to his "New Memoirs of Milton, 1740."

Paradife Loft went through two editions in its author's life-time; but, fince his death, not less than 45 editions are here cnumerited, including Bp. Newton's, Mr. Hayley's, and the prefcut. It is included in Milton's poetical works, in vols. folio, with an excellent life by Mr. Hayley, 1794. This magnificent edition does honour to the tatie and abilities of thofe who were engaged in the production of it. It displays every elegance of typographical excution, and is accompanied with mofi beautiful engravings from the defigns of Wettall. It is a

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monument, indeed, worthy of HIM whofe works entitle him to that fupereminence among the poets of his country which he has fo happily afligned to his own glorious "ille" among the "fea-girt" domains of Neptune. "The greatest and the best of all domains.” Ten of these editions were printed at COMUS, V. 28. Glasgow and Edinburgh; and, at the latter place, “ the first six books of Paradife Loft, rexdering into grammatical conjiruction, the words of the text being arranged at the bottom of each page, in the fame natural order with the conceptions of the mind, and the ellipfis properly fupplied, without any alteration in the diction of the poeni. By the late James Buchanan, authorof the British Grammar. The MS. was left with Dr. James Robertfon, profellor of Hebrew, who has published it for the benefit of the author's widow, Edinburgh, 1773," 8vo*. In our vol. XLIX. p. 191, is mentioned a Greek tranflation of Paradife Loft, by Thomas Denny, a literary pedant, particularly killed in Greek, &c. &c. One of our friends recollects being accotied, in walking out of Cambridge with a fudent there about 1753 or 1754, by a middle-fized and aged man, in his own hair and grave cloaths, in a fuppliant tone for relief, with a Greek fentence or two, purporting that "a fool might fometimes utter a wife faying," but no farther converfation patled.

Milton's Paradife Loft, and the language it was written in, were highly admired by Abbate Salvini, of Forence, whofe tranflation of it into Italian has never yet feen the light.

Our limits do not permit us to enter into a review of the notes fubjoined to this edition, and principally made up of thofe of Newton, Pearce, Richard

fon, and Warton. Thole of Bentley are jutily characterized in the preface, and that in particular on the two conclading lines, reprobated by a concurrence of criticks. Perhaps we thall

not indeed be fevere if we allert that a

* Our Northeim neighbours are very fond of teaching us how to pronounce and write our mother-tongue grammatically We Law in Scotland, about this date, a curious fpecimen of Scotish pronunciation of Englith words, in a cheap form, for the ufe of fchools, which we have never been able to obtain a fecord fight of. Whether it was

by Mr. B. we do not recollect.

finaller

abilities and learning, and for the faithful and exemplary difcharge of the duties of his facred function. He was one of the tranflators of the Manks Bible (fuppofed to be the most confonant to the original of any edited tranflation whatever); and, at the request of the Rev. Dr. Wilton, prebendary of Westminster, &c. he also trauflated into the Manks language a selection of fermions from the works of Bp. Wilfon; the execution of which has been greatly admired by proficients in the Celtic language and its various branches. Mr. C. was, undoubtedly, one of the chief ornaments of the Manks church, adding to reSpectable talents all the virtues and graces which diftinguish and adorn the Chriftian minifter; and, though living in a remote fituation, his character was well known to many perfons in this kingdom eminent for their piety and learning.

At Londonderry, in Ireland, Lieut. Samuel Goodton, of the royal navy.

At Britfield town, co, Cork, the lady of Sir Thomas Roberts, hart.

At Rofcrea, Mr. John Dudley, an extenfive tanner, and one of the people called Quakers.

In her 84th year, Mrs. Lydia Taylor, of Abbey-itreet, Dublin.

Aged 64, Mr. Frederick Dedrickson, an eminent foreign ship-broker at Dublin.

At Belfast, Dr. Hunt, late of Liverpool. John Gardiner, efq. attorney, of Portron, co. Rofcommon.

At Drogheda, Alderman Oliver Fair clough William.

At Limerick, Corporal W Clark, of the light dragoons, a capir. engraver in aquatinta, an excellent draughtsman, and a very ingenions man.

In his 90th year, Mr. Francis Mitchell, writing-mafter, of Dumfries. He was the oldeft freeman of the Incorporations, being admitted io 1736, and was deacon of the Shoemakers about 60 years ago.

At Frend aught-houfe, in his 78th year, Alexander Morvifon, etq. of Bognie. In Edinburgh, Mr. Alex. Brown, merch. Thom is Mackenzie, efq. of Applecrofs. At Brechin, Lieut. James Gib, late of the 2d foot.

Aged 41, Mr. David Bell, an eminent woollen-draper at Newcastle.

At the manfe of Alness, in Rofsshire, iho Rev. Angus Bethune.

Aged 61, Mr. Banks, a native of Kef wick, Cumberland, 16 years clerk to the Carren Company in Scotland.

At his house in Edinburgh cafle, Benj. Bartlet, efq. 48 years ftorekeeper there.

At Forfar, in the 9th year of his age, and 45th of his miniftry, the Rev. Andrew Bruce, minister of the Golpes at Brechin.

At the manfe of Symington, the Rev. W. Logan, minifter of that parish.

At Blantyre, in his 98th year, John Jack fon, efq of Bardyke.

At Domg y, in Waes, a man nomod Griffiths, who had been 39 years manned to bis now furviving widow; atal, during that long period, had never been 10 miles from his home.

At Tiverton, Devon, of a dropfy, Mr. George Owen, a gentleman of extenfiva practice in the law; who bure a lingering and painful illuefs with exemplary and truly Christian fortitude. His lofs is feverely felt by all thofe who regard polifhed manners and rational converfation.

At the fame place, and of the fame difeafe, Mr. Hugh Sweetlan 1, who lately came

At Careyville, near Fermoy, the wife int poffeflion of an independent fortune, of Peter Carey, ele. jun.

In Queen's County, Rice Meredyth, efq. At Phipfborough, fuddenly, aged 82, Mr. Peter Willon, many years a refpectable printer and bookfeller.

At Mount Melick, aged 108, Mr. John Kerwan, parich fexton; who retained his faculties to the laft, and has left a wife nearly his own age.

In Galway, George Browne, efq. late of Browne's town, co. Mayo.

At Graigue, in the Queen's County, Samuel Jackton, efq.

In Athlone, Francis Heverin, efq. late of Correen, co. Rofcommon.

Aged 93, William Hunt, efq. of the county of Tipperary.

At Leith, in Scotland, Alexander Sommerville, efq. corn-merchant, eldeft part. ner in the boute of Sommerville and Briffet. At Aberdeen, in his 89th year, William Brebner, efq. of Learney.

At Eccleferban, Mr. Jn. Frafer, writer. In Elinborg, Lady Elizabeth Kemp, wite of the Rev. Dr. K. one of the minilzers of that city.

and had not long married an amiable lady.

Rev. Mr. Cooper, vicar of Byxgibwin, Oxon, in the gif of the E. of Macclesfield.

In his 70th year, the Rev., Henry Sampfon, many years rector of Crofcombe and Sutton, both co. Somerfet. He was of Wadham college, Oxford; M. A. 1758, His father purchased the rectorial manor and advowfen of the former, and he fucceeded to it on his death, 1774

At Martock, aged 98, Mrs. Joan Patten. At Salisbury, in his 70th year, Mr. Hen. Goldwyer, a gentleman of the most urbane difpofition; the lofs of whom will be very grievousy felt by the poor, his skill as an oculift having been chiefly exercifed gratuitoufly for the relief of their maladies.

The wife of Jn. Poore, efq. of Redbridge. At Bristol hot wells, of a decline, Lieut. F. W. Kinneer, late of the Aimwell gunbrig, nephew of Capt. K. of the navỳ,

Dr. Effex Jones, an eminent phyfician, of Haverfordwest.

At Eye, Suffolk, in the prime of life, Mr. John Manning Denny,

At

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Jayed the mention, fo fully explains its contents, that we need only add, that, though it is on a fubject which of all others ought to be familiar to us, we have received from the whole of it much entertainment, and, from many parts, fatisfactory and pleafing information. We recommend it, therefore, very heartily to all thofe who wish to

be acquainted with the Origin and Progrefs of fo very distinguished an Art.

261. A Sermon, preached at Prittlewell, in Effex, on the 20th of September, 1801; upon the Prayer of Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the late abundant Crop and favourable Harvest, first directed to be used September 13, 1801. By the Rev. Sir Herbert Croft, Bart. Vicar of Frittlewell. 261. A Sermon upon the Peace, preached at Prittlewell, in Effex, on the 18th of October, 1801. By the Rev. Sir Herbert

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Croft, Bart. Vicar of Prittlewell.

THESE two difconrles of the Reverend Baronet are well adapted to the efpecial occafions on which they were delivered, and to the particular audience to whom they were addrefled.

:

The first of them, on the Thankfgiving Prayer, is from Matt. xiii. 30, Gather ve together, first, the tares; and bind them in bundles, to burn them but gather the wheat into my barn;" the fecond from Ifaiah xlv. 7, "I make peace;" and, in both, the fubjects are difcuffed in a manner which had an immediate tendency to imprefs the parishioners of Prittlewell with a true fenfe of their civil and religious duties."

But the most prominent parts of thefe fermons, as published, are the dedications which precede them. In the firft, the Premier is thus addreffed:

"Our httle compexion, at school, formerly, and the tenfibility which you fo feelingly expreffed to me for the fingular position of an old Earonet, might well jastify my defiring to infcribe the following difcourfe with your name. But I defire this, fir, for another Leafolí, It is of confequence, especially in these times, that a great people thould think well of the kind and fuperintending care which is taken of them by thofe who direct the public affairs. Of the leads of the church, collectively and individo lly, there is but one opiston. All, I conclude, think of them as I have fuch paticular reafon to think of the two Archbishops, of the Bishop of Darbam, of the Bishop of London, who fo worthily replaced my late friend, Bishop 3

Lowth, and of my prefent friend, the Bishop of Salisbury. These, and others, hore their parts, undoubtedly, in the fublime and patriotic prayer which caufed me to compofe this difcourfe. But you, fir, are a new man, as to the opinion of the publick; except in the character of, perhaps, the most popular Speaker who has ever adorned the chair of the Houfe of Com• mons. For this reafon I with that every

rank of my countrymen thould know what thofe acknowledge who can best judge; and even those who doubt or deny your talents for all the duties of your prefent difficult and aweful Atation: that no. thing can be more truly amiable, fir, than your private character; and, that we may expect to fee this groundwork of every thing which is good or great, mark, as often as poffible, your public conduct. If the happy word comfort, in this prayer, did not proceed from you, fir (whose attention perfuaded that Mr. Addington was delightto words I have occafion to know), I am ed to adopt it, for the fake of the poor; and I am defirous of doing my beft, that the poor may long continue to couple, in their grateful recollections, the words COMFORT and ADDINGTON. Be contributing to this, I thall not aid the fucceffor of the brave Abercromby in driving the French out of Egypt; but I trust I shall do my part, by it, as a clergyman, in keeping them out of England. Sincerely hoping, fir, that the talents of my old fchoolfellow may equal even the crifis in which our country is entinated to his patriotism, and bleflings, both prefent and future times that, from an honourable peace, and other may deem him one of the greateft, as well

as one of the mott amiable, ministers that England ever knew, I have the honour to be," &c. &c.

bert thus inferibes the fecond fermon: To the Bishop of London Sir Her

"I beg permiffion from your lordship, as my diocefat and as a bishop whofe talents and character I so much respect, to infcribe this difcourfe with the name of Porteus. This, and the printed fermon which accomp mies it, on the thanksgiving for the last harvest, will prove, my lord, that I cheat fully and inftantly obeyed your lordfhip's patriotic wifes in the late perilous times; and that I, for one, repaired to my poft, undeterred by the agueith part of Effex, and did what was in my power, to ferve the public mind, by two difcourfes every Sunday, upon fuch preferment as I have enjoyed fince I quitted the bar, twenty years ago, by Bishop Lowth's defire-a living, given me by that great and good character, of 1201, a year. I have the ho nour to be, with high respect," &c. &c.

263. Breads

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