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COPYRIGHT, 1915, BY LUCIUS HUDSON HOLT

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Riverside Press
CAMBRIDGE . MASSACHUSETTS

U.S.A

PREFACE

The distinctive characteristic of this anthology is the restriction of the number of poets repli resented with the consequent possibility of including an unusually liberal amount of the work

of each author. In consulting anthologies, the present editor has felt that the collections have suffered from the attempt to include selections from all the poets who have risen above mediocrity. Such attempt has in most cases resulted in an inadequate representation of the work of any one author. No reader can feel that from a single poem of a half-dozen stanzas, or even from several short poems, he has gained a fair degree of appreciation of the poetical qualities of an author. Milton's fame does not rest upon L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, and Lycidas, nor Wordsworth's upon Tintern Abbey and the poems of the We are Seven type. To appreciate the position these men rightly occupy in literature, we must have an acquaintance with more of their poetry, we must read and appreciate some of the larger and greater poems that constitute their product. In this belief the editor of the present anthology has limited the number of poets in the period between Chaucer and Browning to those he considers the leading poets, and has thus enabled himself to present, not only the well-known shorter pieces included in all collections, but much of those longer and more important poems which in the final analysis constitute the foundation of the authors' fame.

Any anthology involves judicious selection. That the present one will meet in all respects the varying judgments of all its readers is too much to expect. One person will criticize it for the amount of space devoted to Spenser as compared with that devoted to Chaucer; another will query why Herrick should be allotted so liberal a representation; a third, measuring the number of poems and pages given to the romantic authors, will accuse the editor of having yielded to the spell of the modern. Against such various lines of criticism the editor has little defense to offer. He has tried, within the limits of a single volume, to present a collection of the best and most representative poems of the leading English poets from Chaucer to Browning. He has tried in his selection to approximate the general opinion of those worthiest to judge.

The representation given to one of the poets in particular, Shakespeare, will seem unduly out of proportion to the position he justly has at the head of English literature. Shakespeare, however, is primarily a dramatist, and his greatest poetry is in dramatic form, not to be separated from its context without notable loss of significance. Hamlet's Soliloquy, to one unfamiliar with Hamlet's character and problem, would lose much of its force; Jaques' dissertation on the ages of man needs the forest background, the Duke and his company at their simple meal, and a knowledge of Jaques' character and position to render it vital. The editor has, therefore, after careful consideration, confined the selections from Shakespeare to those pieces which are purely poetical and depend little or not at all upon a dramatic context.

The text in this edition has followed that of the Cambridge editions wherever it has been possible. Many of the brief introductory notes to the separate selections have also been adapted from or taken bodily from the Cambridge editions. The short introductory outline of English poetry is intended merely as a framework in which the reader may conveniently locate the respective poets represented in the anthology. In writing the lives of these twenty-one poets the editor has striven to summarize the most important known facts and to give in a few words a criticism of the work of each poet. In the preparation of the glossary the attempt has been

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made to give the modern synonyms of the obsolete, archaic, and dialectic words in the selections from Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Burns.

In conclusion, the editor desires to extend his thanks to the many friends who by their advice and assistance have helped to form this anthology. When the project was first considered, a tentative table of contents was submitted to a number of persons known to be interested in the reading and study of poetry and critical coöperation was requested. Many of the suggestions given in answer to this request were of great value and were gladly adopted. Lieutenant Robert C. Richardson, Jr., at present assistant professor in the Department of English and History at West Point, prepared the glossary and read the manuscript of the biographies. Miss Irene W. Starr did much of the work in making the indices. Above all, the editor's acknowledgment is due to Professor Henry A. Beers, of Yale University, who has given much valuable criticism of the selections and of the introductory outline.

L. H. H. West POINT, New York,

August, 1915.

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INTRODUCTION . . . . . . xü TIR'D WITH ALL THESE, FOR RESTFUL

DEATH I CRY . . . . . 117

GEOFFREY CHAUCER

NO LONGER MOURN FOR ME WHEN

TRUTH . . . . . . . .

I AM DEAD . . . . . . 118

LAK OF STEDFASTNESSE . . .

THAT TIME OF YEAR THOU MAYST

THE CANTERBURY TALES .

IN ME BEHOLD. . . . . 118

THE PROLOGUE . . . . .

TO ME, FAIR FRIEND, YOU NEVER

THE PRIORESSES TALE . . . 10

CAN BE OLD. . . . . .

THE NONNE PREESTES Tale . 14

WHEN IN THE CHRONICLE OF WASTED

TIME . . . . . . . 118

EDMUND SPENSER ·

LET ME NOT TO THE MARRIAGE OF

THE FAERIE QUEENE (Book I). .

TRUE MINDS . . . . . . 118

EPITHALAMION . . . . . .

PROTHALAMION · · · · · · 112 | ROBERT HERRICK

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

HESPERIDES:

Songs:

THE ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK. 119

“TELL ME WHERE IS FANCY BRED” 115 DELIGHT IN DISORDER . . . 119

“UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE" 115

To DIANEME . . . . . . 119

“Blow, BLOW, THOU WINTER

THE WOUNDED CUPID . . . 119

WIND” . . . . . . 115

To DIANEME . . .

O MISTRESS MINE, WHERE ARE

CORINNA'S GOING A-MAYING . . 120

YOU ROAMING” . . . . 115

THE CAPTIV'D BEE . . . . 120

HARK, HARK! THE LARK AT HEA-

To CHERRY-BLOSSOMS . . . 121

VEN'S GATE SINGS" . . .

TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH

“COME UNTO THESE YELLOW

OF TIME.. . . . . . . 121

SANDS" . . . . . . 115

To ANTHEA, WHO MAY COMMAND

"FULL FATHOM FIVE THY FATHER

AIM ANYTHING . . . . . 121

LIES". . . . . . . 116

To MEADOWS . .

“WHERE THE BEE SUCKS, THERE

OBERON'S FEAST . . . . . 122

SUCK I” . . . . . . 116

To DAFFODILS .

THE BRACELET TO JULIA . . . 122

SONNETS:

To DAISIES, NOT TO SHUT SO

SHALL I COMPARE THEE TO A SUM-

SOON . . . . . . . 122

MER'S DAY? . . . . . 116

To BLOSSOMS . . . . . . 123

WHEN, IN DISGRACE WITH FORTUNE

To A BED OF TULIPS . . . . 123

AND MEN'S EYES . . . . 116

To PHYLLIS, TO LOVE AND LIVE

WHEN TO THE SESSIONS OF SWEET

WITH HIM . . .

123

SILENT THOUGHT . . . . 116

ART ABOVE NATURE,

. 124

NOT MARBLE, NOR THE GILDED

THE NIGHT-PIECE: TO JULIA . . 184

MONUMENTS . . . . . 117

UPON JULIA'S CLOTHES . . 124

LIKE AS THE WAVES MAKE TOWARDS

To His BOOK . . . . 124

THE PEBBLED SHORE . . . 117

WHEN I HAVE SEEN BY TIME'S FELL

NOBLE NUMBERS:

HAND DEFACED . . . . 117 His LITANY TO THE HOLY SPIRIT 194

SINCE BRASS, NOR STONE, NOR EARTH, -

A THANKSGIVING TO GOD FOR His

NOR BOUNDLESS SEA . . 117 | HOUSE .. .. .

.. 125

133

THE DIRGE OF JEPHTHAH'S THOMAS GRAY

DAUGHTER . . . . . 125

ON THE DEATH OF A FAVOURITE CAT 244

TO KEEP A TRUE LENT . . . 126

ON A DISTANT PROSPECT OF ETON

John MILTON

COLLEGE . . . . . . . 244

ELEGY WRITTEN IN A COUNTRY

ON THE MORNING OF Christ's Na-

CHURCHYARD . . . . . . 245

TIVITY. . . . . . . .

TO ADVERSITY . .

L'ALLEGRO

.

. . 247

. . . . . . .!

IL PENSEROSO . . . . . . 132

SONNET ON THE DEATH OF MR.

RICHARD WEST . . . . . 248

LYCIDAS . . . . . .

ODE ON THE PLEASURE ARISING FROM

SONNETS:

VICISSITUDE . . . . . . 248

TO THE LORD GENERAL CROMWELL. 136

ON THE LATE MASSACRE IN PIE-

OLIVER GOLDSMITH

MONT . . . . . . .

136 THE TRAVELLER . . . . . 249

ON HIS BLINDNESS . . . . 137 THE DESERTED VILLAGE . . . 255

To CYRIACK SKINNER . . . STANZAS ON WOMAN ..

. . 261

PARADISE Lost . . . . .

WILLIAM COWPER

John DRYDEN

VERSES SUPPOSED TO BE WRITTEN BY

Mac FLECKNOE . . . . . . 180 ALEXANDER SELKIRK . . . . 282

RELIGIO LAICI. . . . . . 183

THE Task (BOOK V) . . . . 262

TO THE Pious MEMORY OF MRS. .

THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN

ANNE KILLIGREW . . . . 193 GILPIN . . . . .

. . 273

A SONG FOR ST. CECILIA's Day. . 196 ON THE RECEIPT OF MY MOTHER'S

ALEXANDER'S FEAST, OR THE POWER

PICTURE OUT OF NORFOLK . . 276

OF Music . . . . . . . 196 THE POPLAR FIELD . . . . . 278

THEODORE AND HONORIA . . . 199 ON THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL GEORGE . 278

TO THE NIGHTINGALE . . . . 279

ALEXANDER POPE

To MARY . . . . . 279

ODE ON SOLITUDE . . . . : 205

EPISTLE TO MRS. BLOUNT, WITH THE

ROBERT BURNS

WORKS OF VOITURE . . .

ADDRESS TO THE DEIL. . . 281

ELEGY TO THE MEMORY OF AN UN-

THE COTTER'S SATURDAY NIGHT .282

FORTUNATE LADY . . . . . 206

TO A MOUSE . . . . . .285

THE RAPE OF THE LOCK . . . 208

To a MOUNTAIN DAISY . .

ELOISA TO ABELARD . . . . 220 TO A LOUSE . . . . . . 287

SONG! COMPOSED IN AUGUST .

SATIRES:

. 287

.

EPISTLE TO DR. ARBUTHNOT .

ADDRESS TO THE UNCO GUID . 288

. 225

A WINTER NIGHT . . . . . 289

THE FIRST EPISTLE OF THE SECOND
BOOK OF HORACE .

THE GLOOMY NIGHT IS GATHERING

. . . 231

FAST . . . . . .

WILLIAM COLLINS

Tam O'SHANTER . .

290

ODE TO SIMPLICITY. . . . . 238 HOLY WILLIE'S PRAYER . . 293

ODE WRITTEN IN THE BEGINNING OF

A Rose-BUD, BY MY EARLY WALK . 294

THE YEAR 1746 · · · ·

THE SILVER TASSIE

Ode to LIBERTY . . . . . 239 OF A' THE AIRTS .' .

. 295

ODE TO A LADY ON THE DEATH OF MY HEART'S IN THE HIGHLANDS . 295

COLONEL Ross, IN THE ACTION .

JOHN ANDERSON MY Jo . . . . 295

OF FONTENOY. . . . . . 240

Thou LINGERING STAR . . . . 296

ODE TO EVENING . . . . . 241 WILLIE BREW'd a PECK O'MAUT . 296

ODE TO PEACE . . . . . . 242 AE FOND Kiss . . . . . . 296

THE PASSIONS . . . . . .

. 242 THE BANKS O' Doon . . . . 297

DIRGE IN CYMBELINE . . . . 243 ) THE DEIL'S AWA WI' TA' EXCISEMAN 297

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