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HUNTING SONG. . .

. 412 To — “Music, WHEN SOFT

JOCK OF HAZELDEAN . . . . 413

VOICES DIE" . . . . . 542

THE SUN UPON THE WEIRDLAW

To- "ONE WORD IS TOO OFTEN

HILL" . . . . . . . 413

PROFANED" . . . . . . 542

A LAMENT .' . . . . . . 543

LORD BYRON

LINES. “WHEN THE LAMP IS SHAT-

CHILDE HAROLD'S PILGRIMAGE . . 414

TERED” . . . . .'. . 543

“WHEN WE TWO PARTED” . . . 449 A DIRGE . . . . . . . 543

“MAID OF ATHENS, ERE WE PART". 449

JOHN KEATS

“AND THOU ART DEAD, AS YOUNG

- AND FAIR" i . . . . 450

ON FIRST LOOKING INTO CHAPMAN'S

STANZAS FOR Music. “THERE'S NOT

HOMER. . . . . . 544

A JOY THE WORLD CAN GIVE" . . 450

SONNET. “TO ONE WHO HAS BEEN LONG

IN CITY PENT” .

STANZAS FOR Music. “THERE BE

. . . . 544

· NONE OF BEAUTY'S DAUGHTERS" . 451

SONNET. “WHEN I HAVE FEARS THAT

.

“ FARE THEE WELL” . . . 451

I MAY CEASE TO BE" . . .

LINES ON THE MERMAID TAVERN .

StanzAS TO AUGUSTA. “THOUGH THE

. 452

ENDYMION (BOOK I) . .

DAY OF MY DESTINY 'S OVER"

. . 545

FANCY . . . . .

559

EPISTLE TO AUGUSTA, "MY SISTER!

ODE. “BARDS OF PASSION AND OF

MY SWEET SISTER!" . . . . 452

MIRTH".

“SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY" . .

.

. 454

. . .

THE EVE OF ST. AGNES .

“Oh! SNATCH'D AWAY IN BEAUTY'S

. 567

ODE ON A GRECIAN URN

BLOOM”

.
.

.
.

.
.

.

.

. 454

LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI . 568

WHEN COLDNESS WRAPS THIS SUFFER-

ING CLAY”

• 568

ODE TO A NIGHTINGALE

.

.

. .

455

LAMIA . . .

.

. .

VISION OF BELSHAZZAR . t

. .

.

. . 570

. 455

TO AUTUMN . . . . . . . 579

THE DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB 456

The Last SONNET . . . .

THE BRIDE OF ABYDOS . . .

. 580

. 456

SONNET TO LAKE LEMAN . . . 470 MATTHEW ARNOLD

THE PRISONER OF CHILLON . . . 470

REQUIESCAT . . . . . 581

MAZEPPA ... . . . . . 474 RESIGNATION . . . .

PROMETHEUS . . . . .

. 483

SOHRAB AND RUSTUM . . . 584

BEPPO . . . . . . .

THE FORSAKEN MERMAN .

596

DON JUAN . . . . . . . 496

PHILOMELA , .

• 598

.

DOVER BEACH . . . .

. 598

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

THE LAST WORD . . . . 599

ALASTOR . . . . . . . 508 MORALITY . . . .

599

ADONAIS . .

518

A SUMMER NIGHT . . .

SONNET — OZYMANDIAS . . . . 528

THE BURIED LIFE . .

LINES WRITTEN AMONG THE EUGA-

LINES WRITTEN IN KENSINGTON

NEAN HILLS . . .

GARDENS . . . .

602

STANZAS, WRITTEN IN DEJECTION

THE FUTURE . . . . . . 602

NEAR NAPLES

532 THE SCHOLAR-GYPSY .

603

ODE TO THE WEST WIND .

THYRSIS . . . . . . . 608

THE INDIAN SERENADE . . . . 533 MEMORIAL VERSES . . . . . 611

Love's PHILOSOPHY . . . . . 534 RUGBY CHAPEL . . .

612

THE CLOUD

. 534

STANZAS FROM THE GRANDE CHAR-

To A SKYLARK . . . . . . 53

TREUSE . . . . . . 614

ODE TO LIBERTY .

536

To — "I FEAR THY KISSES" . 541

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

THE QUESTION . . . . . . 541 THE LADY OF SHALOTT . . . . 617

To Night . . . . . . . 542 I (ENONE . . . . . . . . 618

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. 773

776

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THE LOTUS-EATERS . . . . . 622 HOME-THOUGHTS, FROM THE SEA A. 766

ULYSSES . . . . . . . 624 SAUL . . . . . . . . 766

TITHONUS . . . . .

. . 625 MY STAR · ·

.773

· :.

“FLOWER IN THE CRANNIED WALL” 626 INCIDENT OF THE FRENCH CAMPx. 773

“BREAK, BREAK, BREAK” . . . 626 My Last DUCHESS. . . . .?

SONGS FROM THE PRINCESS:

THE ITALIAN IN ENGLAND, . .774

THE LAST RIDE TOGETHER

“As THRO' THE LAND AT EVE WE

.

PROTUS. . . . .

777

. 627

.
:

.
.

. .

“SWEET AND LOW" . . . .

THE STATUE AND THE BUST . . 778

"THE SPLENDOR FALLS ON CASTLE

FRA LIPPO LIPPI

781

ANDREA DEL SARTO .

WALLS” . .

787

.

.
. 627

. .

RABBI BEN EZRA . ..

“TEARS, IDLE TEARS, I KNOW NOT

790

WHAT THEY MEAN” .

. 793

.

CALIBAN UPON SETEBOS .

. 627

. .

PROSPICE

“HOME THEY BROUGHT HER WAR-

. .

797

.

RIOR DEAD" . . . . . 627

THE RING AND THE BOOK (BOOK

VII. Pompilia)

COME DOWN, O MAID, FROM YONDER

. . . . . 798

MOUNTAIN HEIGHT"

HERVÉ RIEL

IN MEMORIAM . . .

.628

PAEIDIPPIDES . . . . . 825

CLIVE . . . . . . . 827

SONGS FROM MAUD:

EPILOGUE .

832

"COME INTO THE GARDEN, MAUD" . 664

"O THAT 'T WERE POSSIBLE" . . BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

ODE ON THE DEATH OF THE DUKE OF

GEOFFREY CHAUCER. ..

WELLINGTON . . . . .

666

EDMUND SPENSER . . . .

IDYLLS OF THE KING:

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, . .. .841

DEDICATION . . . . . . 669

ROBERT HERRICK . .

COMING OF ARTHUR . . . . 670 JOHN MILTON . . .

GARETE AND LYNETTE

. 677 JOHN DRYDEN .

LANCELOT AND ELAINE . . . 699 ALEXANDER POPE

853

THE HOLY GRAIL . . .

WILLIAM COLLINS . .. . 856

GUINEVERE . . . . . . 732

THOMAS GRAY . . . .

THE PASSING OF ARTHUR . . . 742 OLIVER GOLDSMITH. . . 861

TO THE QUEEN . . . . . 749

WILLIAM COWPER . . . 865

CROSSING THE BAR . . . .

. 750

.

ROBERT BURNS . . . . 867

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH. . 871

ROBERT BROWNING

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE . 87+

Pippa Passes

877

. . . . .

WALTER SCOTT .

. 751

CAVALIER TUNES:

GEORGE GORDON BYRON

879

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY . 883

MARCHING ALONG . . . . 759

JOHN KEATS . . . .

VE A ROUSE . . . . 760

MATTHEW ARNOLD. . . ..

BOOT AND SADDLE . . . . 760

ALFRED TENNYSON . . . . . 890

The Lost LEADER . . . . . 760

ROBERT BROWNING . . . . . 893

“How THEY BROUGHT THE GOOD

NEWS FROM GHENT TO Arx” . 761

GLOSSARY . . . . . . . 897

CRISTINA . . . . . . . 762

LOVE AMONG THE RUINS . . . 763 INDEX OF FIRST LINES . . . 909

UP AT A VILLA — DOWN IN THE CITY 764

HOME-THOUGHTS, FROM ABROAD J . 765 | INDEX OF AUTHORS AND TITLES 914

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INTRODUCTION

AN OUTLINE SKETCH OF ENGLISH POETRY FROM

CHAUCER TO BROWNING

It is a curious fact that in the history of English poetry the even centuries have been the periods of the most noteworthy and original production. The age of Chaucer, the rich and exuberant English renaissance of Elizabeth's time, and the new springtide of the romantic revival came respectively in the fourteenth, sixteenth, and eighteenth centuries. We do not intend to imply that poetry lapsed in the intervals, that the odd centuries were wholly flat, stale, and unprofitable, nor do we imply that all the great poetry of our literature can be grouped around the even century marks. The exquisite lyrics of Lovelace and Suckling and Herrick, the noble verse of Milton, the polished heroic couplets of Dryden and Pope, the smooth melody and careful art of Tennyson, and the force and inspired insight of Browning would at once give us the lie. What we do mean is that the successive tides of original poetic inspiration seem to have flowed with the even and ebbed with the odd centuries. The Cavalier lyrists and even the sublime Milton are a continuation of the Elizabethan renaissance, and no one will deny the debt of Tennyson and Browning to the poetic revival in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Hence for our brief outline of the course of English poetry, we are led to dwell with special emphasis upon the poetry of the age of Chaucer, of the age of Elizabeth, and of the age of Wordsworth.

1. The CHAUCERIAN PERIOD

1340-1400 Any sketch of English poetry may well begin with Chaucer. Although it is trite now to speak of him as the “Father of English Poetry," that phrase expresses accurately his position in the history of our poetry. He won his eminence under peculiarly difficult conditions. The Norman Conquest in 1066 had prevented the establishment of a standard English speech and had given free scope to the welter of dialects, the remnants of the Anglo-Saxon contending with the new Anglo-Norman. In the field of literature, the English were in bondage to continental models. Men dreamed, maidens loved, and birds sang in England just as they conventionally did in Normandy and France. Before Chaucer, few English works have the native English flavor.

And what did Chaucer do that has won him his place as the first of our long line of English poets? Where there were no models in English for him to follow, he went in the beginning to the literatures of France and Italy, at first translating, paraphrasing, and adapting their material to his verse; but later, and herein his fame lies, he conceived (and executed in part) a great original English poem. By his association with continental Europe he tended to bring the restricted English world into a closer touch and sympathy with the great forerunners of the Renaissance. Among the chaos of Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman speech, he chose with rare natural judgment the elements which combined strength and grace. With a perfect ear he introduced into English versification those meters and verse forms, with the exception of the sonnet and the

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