Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT

MARINER

IN SEVEN PARTS

Danila credo, plurersitate. Sed horum cognationes

Facile credo, plures esse Naturas invisibiles quam visibiles in rerum universitate. Sed horum omnium familiam quis nobis enarrabit? et gradus et cognationes et discrimina et singulorum munera ? Quid agunt ? quæ loca habitant ? Harum rerum notitiam semper ambivit ingenium humanum, nunquam attigit. Juvat, interea, non diffiteor, quandoque in animo, tanquam in tabulk, majoris et melioris mundi imaginem contemplari : ne mens assuefacta hodiernæ vitæ minutiis se contrahat nimis, et tota subsidat in pusillas cogitationes. Sed veritati interea invigilandum est, modusque servandus, ut certa ab incertis, diem a nocte, distinguamus. -T. BURNET, Archäol. Phil. p. 68.

[blocks in formation]

ARGUMENT

right

wind and fair weather, till it reached the Line.

How a Ship having passed the Line was driven by storms to the cold Country towards the South Pole; and how from thence she made her course to the tropical Latitude of the Great Pacific Ocean ; and of the strange things that befell; and in what manner the Ancyent Marinere came back to his own Country. [1798.]

PART I An ancient It is an ancient Mariner, Mariner Anal meeteth three And he stoppeth one of three. Gallants bid. “By thy long grey beard and den to a wed ding-feast,

glittering eye, and detaineth one.

Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

ding-Guest heareth the bridal music; but the

tinueth his tale.

The Bridegroom's doors are

opened wide, And I am next of kin; The guests are met, the feast is

set: May'st hear the merry din.”

Higher and higher every day,
Tils over the mast at noon - " 30
The Wedding-Guest here beat

his breast,

For he heard the loud bassoon. The Wed. The bride hath paced into the

hall,

Red as a rose is she; Mariner con. Nodding their heads before her

goes The merry minstrelsy. The Wedding-Guest he beat his

breast, Yet he cannot choose but hear; And thus spake on that ancient

man, The bright-eyed Mariner. 40 “And now the Storm-blast came,

and he
Was tyrannous and strong:
He struck with his o'ertaking

wings,
And chased us south along.

He holds him with his skinnyhand, “There was a ship," quoth he. 10 "Hold off ! unband me, grey

beard loon!" Eftsoons his hand dropt he.

The ship driven by a storm toward the south pole.

The Wed. He holds him with his glittering ding-Guest is spell-bound

eyeby the eye of The Wedding-Guest stood still, the old seafaring man, And listens like a three years and constrained to

child : hear his tale. The Mariner hath his will.

With sloping masts and dipping

prow, As who pursued with yelland blow

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Day after day, day after day,
We stuck, nor breath nor mno-

tion;
As idle as a painted ship
Upon a painted ocean.

At first it seemed a little speck,
And then it seemed a mist; 150
It moved and moved, and took

at last
A certain shape, I wist.

gins to be

At its nearer approach, it seemeth him to be a ship: and at a dear ransom he freeth his Bpeech from the bonds of thirst.

130

joyi

were

And the Al. Water, water, every where,

A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist ! batross beAnd all the boards did shrink;

And still it neared and neared: avenged. Water, water, every where 121

As if it dodged a water-sprite, Nor any drop to drink.

It plunged and tacked and

veered.
The very deep did rot: 0 Christ!
That ever this should be !

With throats unslaked, with
Yea, slimy things did crawl with

black lips baked, legs

We could nor laugh nor wail; Upon the slimy sea.

Through utter drought all dumb

we stood ! About, about, in reel and rout

I bit my arm, I sucked the blood,
The death-fires danced at night;

And cried, A sail ! a sail ! 161
The water, like a witch's oils,
Burnt green, and blue, and

With throats unslaked, with white.

black lips baked,

Agape they heard me call: A Spirit had And some in dreams assured A flash of Gramercy they for joy did

grin, Of the Spirit that plagued us

And all at once their breath so:

drew in, parted couls Nine fathom deep he had fol

As they were drinking all.
lowed us
From the land of mist and snow.

See ! see! (I cried) she tacks no

more! Constantino- And every tongue, through utter

Hither to work us weal; drought,

without wind Without a breeze, without a tide, Was withered at the root;

She steadies with upright keel! We could not speak, no more than if

The western wave was all aelement with. We had been choked with soot.

flame,

171 out one or

The day was well-nigh done! more. The shipAh! well-a-day! what evil looks

Almost upon the western wave mates, in their Had I from old and young! 140 rore distress,

Rested the broad bright Sun; would fain. Instead of the cross, the Alba

When that strange shape drove throw the whole guilt tross

suddenly on the ancient Mariner: in About my neck was bung.

Betwixt us and the Sun. sign whereof they hang the dead sea-bird

It seemeth And straight the Sun was flecked round his PART III

him but the neck.

skeleton of

with bars, There passed a weary time. /

& ship.

(Heaven's Mother send us Each throat

grace!) Was parched, and glazed each

As if through a dungeon-grate eye.

he peered A weary time! a weary time!

With broad and burning face. How glazed each weary eye, The ancient Mariner be When looking westward, I be

Alas! (thought I, and my heart holdeth a Birn in the held

beat loud) element afar off. A something in the sky.

How fast she nears and nears !

followed
them; one of
the invisible
inhabitants of
this planet,
neither de-
parted souls
nor angels;
concerning
whom the
learned Jew,
Josephus, and
the Platonic
Constantino-
politan,
Michael
Psellus, may
be consulted.
They are very
numerous,
and there is
no climate or

And horror follows. For can it be a ship that comes onward

[ocr errors]

or tide?

181 mates drop

Are those her sails that glance | His ship
in the Sun,

down dead.
Like restless gossameres ?

Four times fifty living men,
(And I heard nor sigh nor groan)
With heavy thump, a lifeless

lump,

230

And its ribs Are those her ribs through which

They dropped down one by one. are seen as bars on the

the Sun face of the

Did peer, as through a grate ? But Life-insetting Sun.

The souls did from their bodies

Death begins The Spectre And is that Woman all her her work on

fly, Woman and

the ancient crew ?

They fled to bliss or woe! her death

221

Mariner mate, and no Is that a Death ? and are there

And every soul, it passed me other on board the two ?

by, skeleton-ship. Like vessel, Like vessel," Is Death that Woman's mate?

Like the whizz of my cross-bow!” like crew! Her lips were red, her looks

PART IV , were free,

190 Her locks were yellow as gold:

The Wed.'

“I fear thee, ancient Mariner ! Her skin was as white as leprosy, ding-Guest I fear thy skinny hand! The Night-mare Life-in-Death Spirit is talk. And thou art long, and lank, and

ing to him; was she,

brown, Who thicks man's blood with

As is the ribbed sea-sand. cold.

I fear thee and thy glittering Death and The naked hulk alongside came,

eye, Life-in-Death have diced for And the twain were casting dice;

And thy skinny band, SO the ship's che The game is done! I've won !

brown.”— crew, and she (the latter)

I've won !' winneth the

But the

“ Fear not, fear not, thou Wedancient Quoth she, and whistles thrice. ancient Ma

ding-Guest! Mariner.

riner assurNo twilight

eth him of This body dropt not down. within the

his bodily The Sun's rim dips; the stars courts of the

life, and proSun.

ceedeth to rush out:

relate his

Alone, alone, all, all alone,
At one stride comes the dark; horrible pen- Alone on a wide wide sea!

ance.
With far-heard whisper, o'er the

And never a saint took pity on sea,

My soul in agony.
Off shot the spectre-bark.

He despiseth The many men, so beautiful ! At the rising We listened and looked side- | the creatures And they all dead did lie : of the Moon,

of the calm. ways up!

And a thousand thousand slimy Fear at my heart, as at a cup,

things
My life-blood seemed to sip!

• Lived on; and so did I.
The stars were dim, and thick
the night,

And envieth

I looked upon the rotting sea, The steersman's face by his lamp that they And drew my eyes away ; 241

should live, gleamed white;

and so many I looked npon the rotting deck, From the sails the dew did drip

And there the dead men lay.
Till clomb above the eastern bar
The horned Moon, with one

I looked to heaven, and tried to bright star

pray ; Within the nether tip.

But or ever a prayer had gusht,

A wicked whisper came, and One after One after one, by the star-dogged

made
another,
Moon,

My heart as dry as dust.
Too quick for groan or sigh,

1 For the last two lines of this stanza, I am in

debted to Mr. Wordsworth. It was on a delightful ghastly pang

walk from Nether Stowey to Dulverton, with him and

his sister, in the antumn of 1797, that this poem was And cursed me with his eye. I

planned, and in part composed. [Note of S. T. C.]

201

lie dead.

210

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
« AnteriorContinuar »