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Then took his Mufe at once and dipt her
Full in the middle of the Scripture.
What wonders there the man, grown old, did!
Sternhold himself he out-Sternholded,
Made (10) David seem so mad and freakish,
All thought him just what thought king Achiz.
No mortal read his (11) Solomon,
But judg’d Re’boam his own son.
Moses he serr'd as Moses Pharaoh,
And Deborah (12), as She Sise-rah :
Made (13) Jeremy full sore to cry,
And (14) Job himself curse God and die.

What punishment all this must follow :
Shall Arthur use him like king Tollo ?
Shall David as Uriah flay him?
Or dextrous Deborah Sisera-him?
Or shall Eliza lay a plot,
To treat him like her fifter Scot?
Shall William dub his better end *,
Or Marlborough serve him like a friend?
No!-none of these !-Heaven spare his life!
But send him, honest Job, thy wife!

(10) Translation of all the Psalms.
(11) Canticles and Ecclesiastes.

(12) Paraphrase of the Canticles of Moses and Deborah, &c.

(13) The Lamentations.
(14) The whole Book of job, a Poem.

* Kick him on the breech, not knight him on the shoulder.

A RE

A RECEIPT FOR STEWING VÉA L.

WITH NOTES BY THE AUTHOR.

'AKE a knuckle of veal;

You may buy it or steal.
In a few pieces cut it :
In a stewing-pan put it.
Salt, pepper, and mace

Must season this knuckle ;
Then * what's join'd to a place

With other herbs muckle ;
That which killed king † Will:
And what never I stands still.
Some § sprigs of that bed
Where children are bred,
Which much you will mend, if
Both spinnage and endive,
And lettuce, and beet,
With marrygold meet.
Put no water at all;
For it maketh things small,
Which, left it should happen,
A close cover clap on.
* Vulgo, falary,
+ Supposed forrel.

I This is by Dr. Bentley thought to be time, or thyme. Parsley. Vide Chamberlayne.

Put

Put this pot of * Wood's mettle
In a hot boiling kettle,
And there let it be

(Mark the doctrine I teach)
Aboutlet me fee-

Thrice as long as you preach t :
So skimming the fat off,
Say grace with your hat off.
O, then! with what rapture
Will it fill dean and chapter !

* Of this compofition, see the Works of the Copperfarthing Dean. + Which we suppose to be near four hours.

ÁCIS

ACIS AND GALATEA,

A

S E R E N A T A.

THE MUSIC BY MR. HANDEL.

PART THE FIRST.

A rural prospect, diversified with rocks, groves, and

a river. Acis and Galatea feated bi' a fountain. Chorus of nymphs and shepherds, distributed about the landicape ; and Polyphemus discovered fitting upon a mountain.

CHORU S.

O

THE pleasure of the plains !

Happy nymphs and happy swains,
(Harmless, merry, free, and gay)
Dance and sport the hours away.
For us the zephyr blows,

For us diftils the dew,
For us unfolds the rose,

And Aowers display their hue :

For

For us the winters rain;

For us the summers fhine ;
Spring swells for us the grain,
And autumn bleeds the vine.

Da Capo.

RECITATIVE.

GALATEA.

Ye verdant plains, and woody mountains,
Purling streains, and bubbling fountains,
Ye painted glories of the field,
Vain are the pleasures which you yield;

Too thin the fhadow of the grove,
Too faint the gales, to cool my love.

AIR.
Hush, you pretty warbling choir,

Your thrilling strains

Awake my pains,
And kindle fierce desire :
Cease your song, and take your flight;
Bring back my Acis to my sight.

Da Capo.

AIR.

Acis.
Where Mall I seek the charming Fair ?
Direct the way, kind genius of the mountains :
O tell me

if
you
saw

my Seeks she the groves, or bathès in crystal fountains ?

Da Capo.
VOL. I.

X

RECI

dear;

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