Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

MASTER OF TUNBRIDGE SCHOOL, AVD LATT FELLOW OT

jons's COLLEGE, OXFORD.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PRINTED FOR J. MAWMAN, POULTRY ;
R, LEA, GREEK STREET, solo; J. WALKER,
PATER NOSTER ROW; AND J. NUNN,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LIN-
COLN'S INN FIELDS.

-1803.

GILLET, PRINTER, SALISBURY-SQUARE.

Page

Vir-

34

44

58

[ocr errors]

No.

CXIX. The Folly of bringing up Children to a learned

Profession, without the Probability of providing them with a

Competency,

1

CXX. On Decenry as the only Motive of 'our apparent

tues, and particularly of our religions Behaviour.

6

CXXI. On the Animosities occasioned in the Country by the

Game Lau's.

10

CXXII. On the Importance of governing the Temper 17

CXXIII. On the moral Ejfects of a good Tragedy

23

CXXIV. On the Influer.ce of Politics, as a Subject of

Conversation, on the State of Literature

29

CXXV. On Buffoonery in Conversation

CXXVI. On the Style of Xenophon and Plato

39

CXXVII. On the Advantages derivable from national Ad-

versity

CXXVIII. On some of the false Pretensions and Impositions

of the Artful and Avaricious

48

CXXIX. On the prevailing Tuste in Poetry

52

CXXX. On the peculiur Danger of falling into Indolence

and retired Life.

CXXXI. On the Manners of a Metropolis

63

CXXXII. On Philelphus and Theodore Gaza, polite

Scholars of the fifteenth Century:

68

CXXXIII. On the Inefficacy of that Style of Speaking and

writing which may be called the Frothy

73

CXXXIV. On the Genius of Erasmus

77

CXXXV. On the Education of a Prince

82

CXXXVI. Introductory Remarks on the art of Printing 86

CXXXVII. On the Circumstances which led to the Discovery

of the art of Printing, with miscellaneous Remarks on it 91

CXXXVIII. On the moral, political, and religious Effects of

Printing ; with concluding Remarks

98

CXXXIX. Cursory Thoughts on Satire und Satirists 108

CXL. On Logic and Metaphysics

113

CXLI. On Latin Verse as an Exercise at Schools

119

CXLII. On the insensibility of the Men to the Charms of a

female Mind cultivated with polite aru solid Literature [in a

Letter]

123

CXLIII. On Parental indulgence

129

CXLIV. On the Poems attributed to Rowley

135

CXLV. On the moral Teudency of the Writings of Sterne 139

CXLVI. On the Weight and Efficacy which Morality may

derive from the Influence and Example of those who are

called the Great.

144

CXLVII. On the Profligacy and consequent Misery of the

lower Classes, and on the Means of Prevention

148

CXLVII. On some Passages in Aristotle's Rhetoric, with

miscellaneous Remarks on his Style, Genius, and Il'orks 155

208

CXLIX. On the Beauty and Happiness of an open Beha-

viour and an ingenuous Disposition.

158

CL. A Remedy for Discontent

163

CLI. On the Utility of religious Ceremonies, anıl of admitting

Music and external Magnificence in places of Devition 168

CLII. On the present Stute of Parliamentary Eloquence 172

CLIII. A Life of Letters usually a Life of comparative

Innocence

178

CLIV. On the Advantage which may be derived to the

tender and pathetic Style, from using the Words and Phrases

of Scripture.

183

CLV. On Reading merely with a view to Amusement 187

CLVI. On a Method of Study, writtten by Joachimus
Fortius Rivgelbergius

191

CLVII. Or the Foily of sacrificing Comfort to Taste 195

CLVIII. On the Erample of Henry V. and the bad Effects-

of an Opinion that u profiigate Youth is likely to terminale

in a wise Manhood

202

CLIX. A good Heart necessary to enjoy the Beauties of

Nature

CLX. On Affectution of extreme Delicacy aud Sensibility 21%

CLXI. On.true Patience, as distinguished from Insensibility

217

CLXII. Cursory Remarks on the Eloquence of the Pulpit.

[In a Letter.]

228

CLXIII. On the superior Value of solid Accomplishments

. A

Dialogue between Cicero and Lord Chesterfield

228

CLXIV. Conjectures on the Difference between Oriental and

Sepienirional, Poetry.

233

CLXV. Cursory; Remarks on the Poetry of the Prophets

, of

Isaiah in particular, und on the Beauties of biblical Poetry

in general.

236

CLXVI. On Preaching and Sermon Writers

243

CLXVII. On the Neglect of ancient Authors. [In a Letter.] 250

CLXVIII. Or the Retirement of a country

Town [In a Letter. ] 252

CLXIX. Cursory Tkanughts on Epistolary Writers

261

CLXX. On the Necessity of Exercise, Amusements, and an

Attention to Health, in a Life of Study. [In a Letter.] 268

CLXXI. On the Merits of Cowley as a Poet

275

CLXXII. Cursory and General Hints on the Choice of Books 281

ELXXIII. .Cursory Remarks on the Odyssey, on Pope's Tran-

slations, Mr. Spence's Essay, ác.

287

CLXXIV. Thoughts on the Oedipus Tyrannus of Sophocles,

and several Circumstances respecting the Crecian Draini 290

CLXXV. Cursory Remarks on some of the Minor English

Poets

293

CLXXVI. Cursory and renconnected Remarks on some of the

Mi:or Greek Poets

298

CLXXVII. A concluding Essay

309

7

ESSAYS,

MORAL AND LITERARY.

NO. CXIX.THE FOLLY OF BRINGING UP CHILDREN

TO A LEARNED PROFESSION, WITHOUT THE PRO.

BABILITY OF PROVIDING THEM WITH A COMPE

TENCY.

THAT admiration is the effect of ignorance, is a truth universally confessed; and nothing so for cibly excites the wonder of the illiterate plebeian, as the character of profound erudition.

Dazzled by the splendor of literary honours, many an honest parent has prevented his son from acquiring a fortune behind the counter, to see him starve in a pulpit.

These reflections were occasioned by meeting an old friend at a coffee-house one evening last week. His looks were meagre, his dress shabby, and he sufficiently apologized for the rustiness of his coat, by the following narrative.

My father," said he, after some preliminary conversation, “ was a shoemaker of tolerable busi. “ ness in London; a very honest man, and very much VOL. III.

B

« AnteriorContinuar »