Letters from France, Written by J. King, in the Months of August, September, October, and Novemeber, 1802: In which Some Occurrences are Related which Were Not Generally Known : and Many Conjectures May be Found that Seemed to Have Anticipated Recent Events

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W. Burton, 1803 - 212 páginas

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Página 118 - That the influence of the crown had increased, was increasing, and ought to be diminished:" and Mr Burke's bill of reform was framed with skill, introduced with eloquence, and supported by numbers.
Página 74 - France, and tryed all he could to prevent it by repeated visits to the Temple, to instruct the king by what measures he might still save: himself; he said several expedients were proposed to the king, but his rejection of them evinced that he had no confidence in the nation and would retort upon it if ever he possessed power. Once he thought the king would accede to his overtures, but he required some hours to ponder on them ; he saw the queen in the interim and declined further treaty. In the last...
Página 67 - He shewed me the master key of that tower of tyranny, within the walls of which so many crimes had been perpetrated; and several species of fetters, one pair of which had been found on the wrists of a man recently dead, who was either doomed by those who immured t him in his cell to die thus miserably, or he was forgotten, and starved to death.
Página 74 - If this contest had ensued, thousands would have perished in it ; he perceived what was passing, and from the most humane motives, (and not to drown the king's voice, and distress him in his last few moments,) he ordered the drums to beat ; and, though the duty of seeing the king's sentence executed, devolved on him, it was impossible he could rejoice at an event, that however necessary was distressing and lamentable ; he deplored it as much as any man in France, and tryed all he could to prevent...
Página 73 - Santerre on these two points, I touched on them and paused, he saw my drift and without hesitation entered on the subject; he said it was expected there would be a cry of mercy, and he had received peremptory orders to fire on those who called for mercy; he saw several well-known aristocrats...
Página 109 - If there have been murders in Lewis the Sixteenth's time, so were there murders in Charles the First's time ; if the French had a Carrier, we had a Kirke ; their Robespierre hardly exceeded our Jeffreys : and the sacrifice of Dailly and the twenty-two had a precedent in the deaths of Kussel and Algernon Sydney.
Página 74 - ... he deplored it as much as any man in France, and tried all he could to prevent it, by repeated visits to »the Temple to instruct the. King by what measures "he might still save himself; he said several expedients were proposed to the King; but his rejection of them evinced that he had no confidence in the nation, and would retort upon it if ever he possessed power.
Página 74 - Marseillois watched them and meant to answer it with a contrary exclamation. If this contest had ensued, thousands would have perished in it ; he perceived what was passing, and from the most humane motives, (and not to drown the king's voice, and distress him in his last few moments,) he ordered the drums to beat ; and, though the duty of seeing the king's sentence executed, devolved on him, it was impossible he could rejoice at an event, that however necessary was distressing and lamentable ; he...
Página 73 - Santerre has been blamed for commanding the drums to fceat, when the king was haranguing the people on the scaffold ; the king had in the tumult of Versailles, in the carnage of the Tuilleries> and in his long confinement and sufferings at the Temple, shewn a calmness that savored of apathy ; now for the first moment of his life he frit emotion and was ruffled ; he has been censured too, for mentioning his death with exultation.
Página 62 - ... suffered, a mountebank had reared his motley chair, and was exhibiting his monkey antics; and while some were gazing at the strokes of the guillotine, others were laughing at the buffoon tricks of this unfeeling fool!

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