Bishop Burnet's History of His Own Time: With the Suppressed Passages of the First Volume, and Notes by the Earls of Dartmouth and Hardwicke, and Speaker Onslow, Hitherto Unpublished, to which are Added the Cursory Remarks of Swift. And Other Observations, Volumen 4

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Página 548 - ... sound judgment, than in imagination or invention : his designs were always great and good ; but it was thought he trusted too much to that, and that he did not descend enough to the humours of his people, to make himself and his notions more acceptable to them : this, in a government that has so much of freedom in it as ours, was more necessary than he was inclined to believe ; his reservedness grew on him, so that it disgusted...
Página 548 - ... spoke little and very slowly, and most commonly with a disgusting dryness, which was his character at all times, except in a day of battle ; for then he was all fire, though without passion ; he was then everywhere, and looked to everything. He had no great advantage from his education. De...
Página 291 - ... within our dominion of England, as may serve to further our interest, and to do from time to time such other acts of hostility against the Prince of Orange and his adherents as may conduce most to our service...
Página 549 - This, in a government that has so much of freedom in it as ours, was more necessary than he was inclined to believe. His reservedness grew on him ; so that it disgusted most of those who served him. But he had observed the errors of too much talking more than those of too cold a silence.
Página 236 - ... he was not only the best preacher of the age, but seemed to have brought preaching to perfection ; his sermons were so well heard and liked, and so much read, that all the nation proposed him as a pattern, and studied to copy after him...
Página 397 - ... he is a man of a very hot temper, soon inflamed, and very brutal in his passion ; he raises his natural heat by drinking much brandy, which he rectifies himself with great application ; he is subject to convulsive motions all over his body, and his head seems to be affected with these ; he wants not capacity...
Página 397 - He was, indeed, resolved to encourage learning, and to polish his people by sending some of them to travel in other countries, and to draw strangers to come and live among them.
Página 508 - Parliament will be called to the result thus obtained, with a view to such improvements in the laws which regulate the rights of voting in the election of members of the House of Commons as may tend to strengthen our free institutions and conduce to the public welfare.
Página 486 - Harley moved, that some conditions of government might be settled as preliminaries, before they should proceed to the nomination of the person, that their security might be complete. Accordingly, they deliberated on this subject, and agreed to the following resolutions : That whoever shall hereafter come to the possession of this crown, shall join in communion with the church of England as by law established : That, in case the crown and imperial...
Página 551 - ... him ill. He loved the Dutch, and was much beloved among them : but the ill returns he met from the English nation, their jealousies of him, and their perverseness towards him, had too much soured his mind, and had in a great measure alienated him from them ; which he did not take care enough to conceal, though he saw the ill effects this had upon his business. He grew, in his last years, too remiss and careless as to all affairs, till the treacheries of France...

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