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worn fingers and weary eyes, to join with Jonson in mourning and praising the great fellow-craftsman whom he knew, to watch with Pepys the coronation of the king or hear him piously thank God for the money won at gamiug—these are things, it should seem, to arouse the most torpid imagination. If, from excursions of this nature, the student learns that good literature and interesting reading matter meet, that the one is not confined to exalted odes nor the other to current magazine fiction, a very real service will have been done by widening the scope oi this volume.

It is obvious that in pursuing the study of such diverse material, no single method will suffice. Sometimes, as has already been hinted, reading is all that is necessary. But when a writer like Bacon, let us say, or Pope, writes with the deliberate purpose of instruction, his work must be studied with close application and may be analyzed until it yields its last shade of meaning. On the other hand, when Keats sings pathetically of the enduring beauty of art and the transient life of man, or when Browning chants some message of faith and cheer, a minutely analytical or skeptical attitude would be not only futile but fatal. And when the various purposes of instruction, inspiration, and aesthetic delight are combined in one work, as in the supreme example of Paradise Lost, the student who hopes to attain to anything like full comprehension must return to it with various methods and in various moods. It is from considerations like these that the teacher must determine his course. One thing, however, cannot be too often repeated. The most successful teacher of literature is he who brings to it a lively sympathy springing from intimate knowledge, assured that method is of minor moment so long as there is the responsive spirit that evokes response.

For ourselves, we would say that while we have divided the labor of preparing both copy and notes, there has been close cooperation at every stage of the work. We owe thanks for suggestions and encouragement to more friends than we may undertake to name. To Dr. Frederick Klaeber, in particular, of the University of Minnesota, we are indebted for advice upon the rendering of certain passages in Beowulf, and to Professor Lindsay Todd Damon, of Brown University, for a critical vigilance that has worked to the improvement of almost every page. By courtesy of The Macmillan Company the translations which represent Cynewulf have been reprinted from Mr. Stopford A. Brooke's History of Early English Literature; and by a similar courtesy on the part of Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons, who hold copyrights in the works of Stevenson, we have been able to include the selections which close the volume.

A. G. N.
A. E. A.

CONTENTS

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✓beowulf (c. 700) J

Deor's Lament 18

Caedmon 111. 670)

rarnphrase of the Scriptures

From Genesis: The Garden of Eden:

The Fall of Satan 18. 10

From Exodus: The Cloud by Day;

The Drowning of I'haraoh 19

Bede (673-735) . .

From the Ecclesiastical History (finished

731):

The Britons Seek Succor from the

Romans. The Roman Wall.... 20

A Parable of Man's Life 21

The Story of Ca»dmon 21

Cvnewulf (fl. 6701

Hiddles II. VI. XV 23

From the Christ 24

From the Elene 24

Anglo-saxon Chronicle (begun about 850)

Extracts 25

c, The Battle of Brunanburh 26

Alfred The Great (849-001)

Ohthere's Narrative 27

ANGLO-NORMAN PERIOD

GEOFFREY OF MONMOUTH (c. 1100-1154)

From the Illstorla Itritonum Kegnm (c.

1135):

The Story of King Lelr 29

Arthur Makes the Saxons Ills Tribu-

taries 31

Anchen Riwlk. From the (c. 1225) 32

Proverbs Of King Alfred, From the 35

Cuckoo Song IC. 1250) 36

FOURTEENTH CENTURY—AGE OF CHAUCER

Tearl, From the (c. 1350) 37

William Lanoland (13327-1400?)

From The Vision of Piers the Plowman
(1362 onward):

The Prologue (B text, 1377) 39

From Passus 1 40

The Wyclif Bible (c. 1380). The Kino

James Biiilk (1611) 41

Geoffrey Chaucer (13407-1400)

From The Can(erbury Tali's (c. 1386 on-

ward):

The Prologue 43

The Nonne Preestes Tale 53

From the Legend of Good Women (c.

1385): The Story of Thlsbe of

Babylon. Martyr 60

The Complevnt of Chaucer to Ills Purse

(1309) 62

Travels Of Sir John Mandbville, From the
(written c. 1350: English trans-

lation after 1400) 63

THE FIFTEENTH AND EARLY SIXTEENTH

CENTURIES

Ballads

Robin Hood and the Monk (MS. c. 1450). 69

The Hunting of the Cheviot 73

Sir Patrick Spens

v'Johnle Cock 77

John Evelyn (1620-1706)

From His Diary 274

John Dryden (1-631-1700)

From Absalom and Achltophel (1681).. 277

Mac Flecknoe (1682) 280

A Song for St. Cecilia's Day (1687) 282

Alexander's Feast: or, The Power of

Music (1097) 283

Lines Printed under the Engraved Por-

trait of Milton (1688) 285

Song from The Indian Emperor (1665). 285 .

Song of Thamesls (1685) 286"^

Song from Cleomcnes (1692) 286

The Secular Masque (written for the year

1700) 286

On Chaucer (1700) 288

EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

Sir Richard Steele (1072-1729)

Prospectus. The Tatler, No. 1 (April

12, 1709) 290

Memories. Tbe Tatler, No. 181 (June 6,

1710) 291

The Club. The Spectator, No. 2 (March

2, 1711) 292

Joseph Addison (1672-1719)

Sir Roger at Church. The Spectator, No.

112 (Julv 9, 1711) 295

Ned Softly. The Tatler, No. 163 (April

25, 1710) 296

Frozen Words. The Tatler, No. 254

(Nov. 23. 1710) 298

A Coquette's Heart. The Spectator, No.

281 (Jan. 22. 1712) 300

The Vision of Mlrza. The Spectator, No.

159 (Sept. 1, 1711) 301C

Matthew Prior (1664-1721)

To a Child of Quality Five Years Old

(1704) 303

A Simile (1707) 304

An Ode (1709) S04

A Better Answer (1718) 304

John Gay (1685-1732)

The Hound and the Huntsman. Fable

XLIV (1727) 305

The Poet and the Rose. Fable XLV

(1727) 305

Alexander Port (1688-1744)

Ode on St. Cecilia's Day (written 1708). 305

From An Kssav on Criticism (1711;

written 1709) 307

The Rape of the Lock (1712, 1714) 310

An Essay on Man. Epistles I and II

(1733) 319

The Universal Praver (1738) 325^

Daniel Defoe (1659-1731)

From Robinson Crusoe (1719) 326

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)

From Gulliver's Travels: A Voyage to

Lllllput. Chapters I, II. and

III (1726) 330

James Thomson (1700-1748)

The Seasons. From Spring (1728) 342

From the Castle of Indolence (1748)... 344

Rule, Britannia (1740) 345

LATER EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

William Collins (1721-1759)

A Song from Shakespeare's Cymbeline

(1744) 346

Ode. How Sleep the Brave (1746) 346

Ode to Evening (1747) 346

Thomas Gray (1716-1771)

Elegy Written In a Country Churchyard

(1751) 347

The Progress of Poesy (1757) 340

James Macpherson ("ossian") (1736-1796)

Olna Morul (1762) 351 r

From Carthon: Osslan's Address to the

Sun (1762) 352

Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770)

Epitaph on Robert Canynge 352

An Excelcnte Balade of Cbaritie 353

From The Battle of Hastings 354

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Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tin-

tern Abbey (1708) 416

Strange Fits of Passion I Have Known

(1799) 418

She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways

(1799) 418

I Travelled Among Unknown Men (1799) 418

Three Years She Grew In Sun and Shower

(1799): 418

A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal (1799).. 419

Lucy Gray (1799) 419

The Prelude; or. Growth of a Poet's
Mind. From Book I, Childhood

(1799) 420

My Heart Leaps up when I Behold

(1802) 422

The Solitary Reaper (1803) 422

To the Cuckoo (1804) 422i/

She Was a Phantom of Delight (1804).. 423

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud (1804)... 423

Ode to Duty (1805) 423

To a Skylark (1805) 424

To a Skylark (1825) 424

Ode: Intimations of Immortality (1803-

1806) 424

Sonnets: Composed upon Westminster

Bridge (1802) 426

It Is a Beauteous Evening, Calm and

Free (1802) 427

On the Extinction of the Venetian

Republic (1802) 427

London, 1802 (1802) 427

The World Is Too Much With Us

(1806) 427^

After-Thought (1820) 427

Samuel Taylor Coleridoe (1772-1834)

Kubla Khan (written c. 1708; printed

1816) 428

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1708) 428

Cbrlstabel. Part the First (written 1797;

printed 1816) 436

France: An Ode (1708) 440

Hymn Before Sunrise In the Vale of Cha-

niount (1802) 441

The Knight's Tomb (1817?) 442

Song from Zapolya (1817) 442

Youth and Age (1823-1832) 442

Work Without Hone (1827) 443

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)

Lochinvar. From Mannlon (1808) 443

Soldier, Rest! From The Lady of the

Lake (1810) 444w^

Coronach. From The Lady of the Lake

(1810) 444

The Battle of Beal an' Duine. From The

Ladv of the Lake (1810) 445

Jock of Hazbldean (1816) 447

Proud Maisle. From The Heart of Mid-

lothian (1818) 448

County Guv. From Quentin Durward

(1823) 448

Bonny Dundee (written 1825) 448

Here's a Health to King Charles. From

Woodstock (1826) 440

Lord Byron (1788-1824)

From English Bards and Scotch Re-

viewers (1800) 449

Maid of Athens. Ere We Part (1812)... 451

She Walks In Beauty (1815) 452r

The Destruction of Sennacherib (1815).. 452

So We'll Go No More A-Rovlng (1817).. 452

Stanzas Written on the Road between

Florence nnd Pisa (1821) 453

To Thomas Moore (1817) 453

Sonnet on Chlllon (1816) 453

The Prisoner of Chlllon (1816) 453

From Cbllde Harold, f'Rnto III (1816):

Waterloo 457

Night on Lake Leman 458

From Chllde Harold, Canto IV (1818):

Venice 460

Rome 461

The Coliseum 462

The Ocean 463

From Don Juan, Canto II (1810):

The Shipwreck 464

From Don Juan, Canto III (1821):

The Isles of Greece 465

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1702-1822)

Alastor, or The Spirit of Solitude (1816). 468

Ozymandlas (Sonnet) (1819) 476

Ode to the West Wind (182(1) 476

The Indian Serenade (written 1810) . .... 477

From Prometheus Unbound (1820):

Song 478

ABia's Response . ..'. 478

The Cloud (1820) 478

Vto a Skylark (1820) 470

From Adonals (1821): The Grave of

Keats 480

Chorus from Hellas (1822) 481

To . Music, when Soft Voices Die

(written 1821) 482

To . One Word is Too Often Pro-

faned (written 1821) 482

A Lament (written 1821) 482

When the Lamp is Shattered (written

1822) 482

A Dirge (written 1822) 483

John Keats (1705-1821)

From Endymion, Book I: Proem (1818). 483

The Eve of St. Agnes (1820) 483

Ode to a Nightingale (18201 488

Ode on a Grecian Urn (1820) 480

i/Ode on Melancholy (1820) 400

To Autumn (1S20) 490

Lines on the Mermaid Tavern (18201... 400

In a Drear-Mghted December (c. 1818). 401

La Belle Dame Sans Merci (1810) 491

Sonnets: On First Looking Into Chap-

man's Homer (1817) 402

On the Grasshopper and Cricket (De-

cember, lHKi) 492

On Seeing the Elgin Marbles (1817). 492

On the Sea (1817) 402

When I have Fears that I may Cease

to be (1817) 492

Bright Star! Would I were Stedfast

as Thou art (18201 403

Latk Georgian Ballads And Lyrics

^Robert Southev: The Battle- of Blen-

heim (1798) 493

Thomas Campbell: Ye Mariners of Eng-
land (1800. 1809) 404

Hohenllnden (1802) 404

Charles Wolfe: The Burial of Sir John

Moore (1817) 494

Thomas Moore: The Harp that Once

through Tara's Halls (1808)... 495

The Minstrel Bov (1813) 495

Oft. In the Stilly Night (1810) 495

Charles Lamb: The Old Familiar Faces

(1798) 495

Walter Savage Landor: Rose Aylnier

(1806) 40G

Leigh Hunt: To the Grasshopper and

the Cricket (December, 1816).. 406

Rondeau (1838) 406

Abou Ben Adhem (1844) 406

Wlntnrop Mackworth Praed: Letters

from Teignmouth. I—Our Hall

(1829) 497

Thomas Lovell Beddoes: Dream-Pedlary

(c. 1825: printed 1851) 408

Thomas Hood: The Death-Bed (1831).. 408

The Song of the Shirt (1843) 408

Robert Stephen Hawker: The Song of

the Western Men (1825) 490

The Silent Tower of Bottreau (1831) 500

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)

From Old Mortality. Chapter I, Pre-

liminary (1816) 500

Charles Lamb (1775 1834)

From Ella (1822-24): Dream-Children:

A Reverie 504

A Dissertation Upon Roast Pig 506

From The Last Essavs of Ella (1833):

Old China 509

Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864)

'From Imaginary Conversations: Metel-

lus and Marlua (1829) 512

Leofrlc and Godlva (1829) 514

THE VICTORIAN AGE

Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

From Sartor Resartus (1833-1834):

The Everlasting Yea 526

Natural Supernaturallsm 529

From the French Revolution (1837):

Storming of the Bastlle 532

Thomas Babinoton, Lord Macaulay (1800-

1859)

From The History of England (1848-

1800): London In 1085 539

The London Colfee Houses 541

The Battle of Killlecrankle 543

John Henry, Cardinal Newman (1801-1800)

Site of a University (1854) 548^

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)

A Christinas Tree (1850) 551

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863)

From The English Humourists of the

Eighteenth Century (1851):

Goldsmith 559

From Roundabout Tapers (18(10-63): De

Juventute 564

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1800-1802)

The Lady of Shalott (1833) 567

CEuone (1833) 560

The Lotos-Eaters (1833) 572

Saint Agnes' Eve (1837) 572

Sir Galaliad (1842) 573

The Beggar Maid (1842) 574

You Ask Me Why, Tho' III at Ease (1842) 574

Of Old Sat Freedom on the Heights

(1842) 574V

Morte D'Arthur (1842) 574

Ulysses (1842) 577

Locksley Hall (1842) 578

A Farewell (1842) 583

Break, Break, Break (1842) 583

Songs from the Princess (1847. 1850):

Sweet and Low 583

The Splendour Falls 583

Tears, Idle Tears 584

From In Memorlam (1850) 584

In the Valley of Cauteretz (1801) 587

In the Garden at Swalnston (written

1870) 588 .

Song from Maud (1855) 588^

The Charge of the Light Brigade (1854). 580

The Captain (1865) 589

The Revenge (1878) 590

Northern Farmer. Old Style (1864) 502

Rlzpah (1880) 504

Milton (1863) 506

To Dante (1865) 590

To Virgil (1882) 596

Frater Ave atque Vale (1883) 596

Flower In the Crannied Wall (1870).... 507 .

Wages (1868) 597"'

By an Evolutionist (1889) 597

Vastness (1885) 597

Crossing the Bar (1889) 598

Robert Browning (1812-1889)

From Plpoa Passes (1841): New Year's

Hvmn: Song 598

Cavalier Tunes (1842) 599

Incident of The French Camp (1842)... 600

My Last Duchess (1842) 600

In a Gondola (1842) 601

The Pled Piper of Hamelln (1842) 603

How Thev Brought the Good News from

Ghent to All (1845) 606 .

The Lost Leader (18451 607^

Home-Thoughts, From Abroad (1845)... 608

Home-Thoughts, From the Sea (18451... 608

The Bov and the Angel (1845) 608

Saul (1845-55) 609

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