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of the late Dr. Hunter, which went along skies and perfuned airs, the sight from the party. We were standing below, and with with the museum to Glasgow, is brought to summit was most noble, various, and pic-our backs to the sun. The unemployed our memory by this Cardinal. This study turesque. This is the land of colours, and slaves were scattered round the edge of the was transferred to the celebrated picture of the landscape was an immense panorama, circle, wrapped in their brown cloaks, that the Woman taken in Adultery, and was, we tinged in tong sweeps of radiance, as if reached to the ground, and with their fixed believe, considered a portrait of Otho each was the division of a map. Lombardy dark faces and unmoving figures, like so Venius or M. de Vos. It is probably the lay before us on the left, an endless expan- many monuments of stone. The sun was costume of the character, but the precise sion of the green of vineyard and fruit now touching the horizon, and broad gleams fan-like form of the prelitical dress does gardens; then came the true Italian view of fiery light were struggling through the not improve the appearance of the whole; of hills, touched with crimson lights, and heavy clouds that were rolling downwards but the great merit, independent of this in the intervals glimpses of three or four to the hill. In the midst of a sudden glare slight objection, lies in the dignity and cha- remote lakes, that looked like sheets of of rose-coloured and sanguine radiance, one raeter of the head.

sanguined steel.

In front the sun was of the women advanced from the centre of No. XXV. THE Infant Moses. stooping in full glory upon Milan, and the the dancers, who were grouped on the sumJohn Jackson, R. A.

dome of the Cathedral rose among heavy mit. She was a tall and stately figure, and In this specimen Mr. Jackson has ap- purple clouds, like a pillar of gold ;-the must have once been very handsome. A proved himself an exquisite colourist. There Bolognese hills were the relief of this mag- Greek and stern profile, bold and rapidlyis a lightness and transparency in the tones nificent foreground, and they had the ad-moving eyebrows, large eyes of the deepest of the flesh, which are truly desirable in all ditional depth of being loaded with what black, a cheek of artificial crimson, and a subjects of this nature, and maintain a fine seemed a growing thunderstorm. To all mouth of such dimpled sweetness. as harmony with the back-ground. The mark this nothing was wanting but a group of strangely contrasted with the haughty and ing of the neck is too sudden, and gives us banditti, or a procession of pilgrims; and, tragic expression of her general physingthe idea of a head separated from the as Fortune would have it, we were sud nomy.

We afterwards learned that she borly.

denly called from our aerial contemplations was a Turkess who had been sent among XXIX. MEG MERRILIES.

to look upon what might have been taken the menials of the Haram for some act of Sir W. Beechy, R. A.

for either. Our guide, whom we sent to violence or revenge. She declaimed a soIn this the artist has not embodied our reconnoitre, soon returned, and told us liloquy of which we did not understand one idea of the Scotch gipsy. Smoothness of that they were redeemed slaves from Al-word, for it was in Arabic. She frequently painting does not accord with a character giers. They seemed a very ferocious troop; pointed to the Heavens, then cast her eyes of so much energy. As we shall hereafter we, however, were numerous enough not round, paused, listened, then gazed up have to pay a tribute of applause to another to feel much alarm, and waited for their wards as if she saw some descending wonpicture by the same hand, we may be ex- coming, which was preluded by a general der ; this closed with a prostration. A tused here giving an opinion that the pre-Pira for the Bravi Inglesi. They were painter might have made a noble study of sent is a fai ure.

about 40; some of them had been long in this subject, with the wild gesture and ilXXXVI. AN AFTERNOon's Nap. slavery, and bore the marks of an African lumined figure, the scarlet shawl that F. P. Stephanoff

sun in their stained and withered complex- crowned her brow, like a wreath of fire in A very clever picture; full of spirit, whe- ions. We soon grew excellent friends, and the sun, and her countenance alternately ther it regards the character and expression heard a multitude of stories of the attack brightening and darkening as if with the speli or technical skill in the art. This little under Lord Exmouth,—unicasured praise within. She might have stood for a Casdomestic intrigne represents a daughter en- of English gallantry, and some strong de- sandra. As she rose the two parties comgaged with a lover while her father is asleep scriptions of the desperation of the Moors, menced singing in turn, and with the same -she is forbidding his entrance, as a dog, and the slaughter within the walls. We style of gesture, turning from Earth to not sleeping so sound as his master, has were genero:ls, as they called it; and, be- Heaven. This singular pantomime was to taken the alarm. It is very humorously fore parting, they gave a specimen of their represent the transmission of Mohammed's treated, and our attention is divided, but, gratitude. They produced two women, sword from the upper world; and, whether at the same time, gratified between the whom, in defiance of all the laws of Algiers from the vengeance of their Moorish masearnestness of the girl and the profoand re- and Mahommed, they had smuggled away, ters, or its iutrinsic beauty, had been one pose of the father. We wish we could add in the general confusion of their departure, of the tasks imposed on such of the slaves that the contrast was as happily preserved and we were honoured with a dance. The sun as exhibited any “music in their souls" to in their colour ; but the mellowness and was now setting, and we became impatient learn. The chorus, heard at another time richness of the sleeper and all around himn of lingering among the hills, and rather and place, might not liave produced any is disturbed by the cold and chalky white- suspicious of night in such company. How very extravagant adıniration, and its inness of the daisel. Upon the whole, the ever, they insisted that they should be per- strumental part was miserable; but heard subject is full of vigour, and the relief a mitted the honour of exhibiting their finest under all the circumstances, even the chime great improvement upon some of the ar- specimen of African accomplishment. They of the mandolines, and the sad and deep tist's preceding perforinances.

ranged themselves into two parties, with notes of the desert horn, breaking in among

the exception of ten or twelve, who did not voices that in all their captivity were Italian, ORIGINAL POETRY. consider themselves cqual to the display seemed, in that place of solitude, and in

A few moments were enough for them to the presence of the beings who had themMONTICELLO.

bind their sashes round thcir heads into selves undergone the “perils by fire, and (From the VS. Journal of a late Tour on the some resemblance of a turban; their cloaks food, and chains o' the Moor," made up, Continent.)

were flung scarfed round their shoulders, as we all subsequently agreed, the most We had returned froin our excursion on and we found ourselves in the presence of powerful effect that we had ever experienced the lake with something like a determina- what might be easily mistaken for a band froin music. On parting they gave us the tion, not the less sincere for its being less of travelling Moors. They had contrived words of their chant, which I send you " loud than deep,” to look for no more to preserve some mandolines and a wild versified, from a literal translation by our raptures in water excursions ;-but the kind of horn in use among the shepherds friend II evenings in this country are so proverbially on the borders of the desert. They found

THE PROPHET'S SCYMITAR. tine, that one easily forgets the rulilings of out a level spot on the hill side, and com

I see a tempest in the sky, the day. The sun was going down as we menced with a species of chorus and a con The clouds are rushing wild and high! ascended the hill to the Casa Caralrtti, fused dance. This soon ceased, and they "Tis dark—and darker still! The moou and, without the usual raptures on orange divided, One of the females headed each Is wan--is fiery redis gone;

Aber thobana's play a ring ** vertel laghat hasnt wnrenns.

(HOnts.

luable information on the subject :-ut 1a em at, suund, is suil,

Now, woe to helm, and stor to shiele,

the work to shipurticular praise is due. 44 na -me, Fair, and bill.

That meria it rning o'er the field;

is hie admiralide Treaine on the .Verve of Hotels in the art-pal

Like dust latureita onlap shad fail

the Breast and Bells, which contains anih tantlar upward baxt: The tempera sword, two minimal ;

debeatr and aeruratr dissertas, ll. truere 1. imia uswant to the pole

Till like a star it* s'ories sweil

boy plates no exerdeutly bai-bed, that few ***, - vp us they roll, In tertors on the Induki;

anaiomial works can lor pat in competition Tre Sering of have birth

A sun, futeedom'd to pur its rays

with it, and not a single one, of any anton, 19nt, t. kar sa stain of earth.

Tul earth is burning in its filase!

be placed alm*e it. Waiter peurii, it

were, a new wawid. He writinya greatly Terra Auto apain thr pral

SOVET TO HOROSTY.

rnriched the scirme; but he has lento Tug' the whirlwind, well, I'ntten crm- iar in Ihr puebral less of an old

ryually great treasure in his Analomwad **** repetute on the car i Tak ma mogu sphere,

Examiart cu apaper,

Muscum, the produce of mily years wur. Tant na narart of light, With what a witry fine aspac does that sweet

fatigable labour. His Majesty has pilt. * dar mammuil of the night;

willage by low denar

ebused this caluinet wah rovad labrtal y, 18 gr speak at its verke, Hlemmid parinly mund with hi!), an! lt wk, and and grarjoriely opeurd it for general in Iar marta ofta h, anal, in tegen.

spring,

spection. Very low anatomia ex date ar The I Nord Harn # **v and talm, And stram, an wind, and wale, and all exch quired so grma a degree of all.it no one The more y np its inrus falia,

thing

has cumpleted such a collected by his own T-4 prath's this the metilata's brow, Mont lavtiful, tu Vilson '--sure place, industry Maorugni indeed equalled him Telebe bog' he wake bebew,

where undone Anime, fær um can qua, Hortal drumpa tebet infirinity

in mal aur deat; but alueet tar whole of da sretne tour, en stor binne! To leaa luonto eterni

Marcu's tror preparatas are destroyed. Whom (ops and white-washt mottarr, snugly

Walter's collection remar, a mole montTo a Warner swept that sound, so mingies,

ment of Corruan industry, and inay sulit Just like this wetry pretty little Barris for croturies, Jay of his m* rias peror i quins the metal car?

That oferhuners the birrrr ('anal lows, haps te now oo longer apprened; but this Ach the purit A.ng

Where Surferhat's steadyrito'er 'et tale in pista **** to lan with all those who men all its sprint dongles

ladmuur in the experimental RTA. I med laver le burar more, till rise

Wirst beautiful!), bow it is poorele *** wwe ta l'armedasta, My brain to tell ther, lima, ball the sweets of new impruiemenis; but he'set * ***

whose ha every sury praling day bringe with a • met her (o tai puomit.

Muzike har man water they wat, Hill!--Esaugh:- 0) bare me bence, ere life shall in the braucta of mim, wuil alsavs hoid

Waiter's name in langt bonour, tar bor has 4 strate, bergbt o'er bright, uns to do in oi tingkat Ve Powen Dewise that I may lose for ever.

porumluced work that are matenpurees in 1 bora ha de frete slar to star,

Waira beat kind, and grands cslealed their immade author talsman of war,

of our knowledge." TY TN masti bleu Scymitar!

10 WALTER SCUTT,

On Arering dan laat de, har Nase aparte, And PROFESSOR SLBALDU RIS. tuh* - Ang in Hraren,

last hus laureda on the Arlu Il certama
Oh why shalt they say that thy brin't wrath

"tr W. Jawa'y 11, 1e1-. W Pre, Prince, for thime That on Waterloo's plain, it has withara'd ent learned Professor werbalda Rin, a thor of

** Yesterday expeing died here the prev dond ve the merah bami, Why couple shy nair with a tyrant's deurwiel,

need of "rer and 3 moje mythy. I w. Uhm.'

Arant say that with thao, thy tmur lautets have derdlist laturrt, and attraminds ** Prim. > ar dwels fur bre. Oh an'- they still lire-th a drar pixlox Ysl in High howed with entry polimer fra

fecerit, of tr.antal liter fitr, for had the (no r.

tart!
Hurter det rartim not raty oborpara

petatmin nl Tus for the ben pap end of
- **tr stor!
In pravurn the trenupuhe operation properador * stire,

«110v yrar, and hot panter, for sawit na, wed thus ht's qual' And crowu biare the prevede of the (alebo mo.

paght years, the most porn hoe hid Min. 11 mes push of the Pt pope !..

have attino per ***, either her op forarth Mame

pierwher, Tern, Run to the obie. folk!, frame

BIOGRAPHY.

ret, and had lopapodane the future to the trust in,

retain to the 1: trep thr pos topp som thers wat PROFESSOR WALTER,

******* ! h 17:11, tra! forff spre u sheme ;-

was a h.an nf flog meret ****.lis.

OF BIRLAS. runt frumn its strop.

parturls in the # end restart - Hear thar setibroad

The fren followin: briters are the ihr Fast and their dre op a!iter ofurs, are death of tup of the oldest Prufresors in peral's relebipetit for it. on that the

Furope, both in the forgina.ng of January Hisha heel ouf i roto with above 9 h (HR.

rraen to be of horn me of its patro

* Bes, Jr 6 (Wr "ቼ በዝግ ሞ? w M *** nofort 1991, !**!. munder the buurmany gleamu! “On the 4th of this mouth, Besoin loaned truly ***,2-438 oppupet, daton paper de VIL

one of its most cruebrated men, die idee bun, and real bell been to lear, wrhrUm death of M Proyed our bop Wallet, fire plan te gaan, the groepe bo naofa l

Professor of Purnirs, Anates, and you med et Author born in the term & trailer orden the war mifen, and Meanbers of the Arm-lemy of who were Bramante ! Mn

- 1 1 Br. Mos hady care

Sienos. He was in the 4th year of his res mesos, a nya! Bale .. wote marea

agr, bring brent at Riipiseboroke in Prusia, Kirk m, -as humre * Pros", 4 chasten of termi

on the 1st of July 1744 H (standing latinis to ofert!.:;* art." Pa Tune # model of anirate deset prion, feu de beirt rise to 81.'e1:and the ****** te $ - do 4, the last time was one on profund kiloddge, and fill of ra anel borge:top hoe lig" ,

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of the late Dr. Hunter, which went along skies and perfumed airs, the sight from the party. We were standing below, aud with with the museum to Glasgow, is brought to summit was most noble, various, and pic-our backs to the sun. The unemployed our memory by this Cardinal. This study turesque. This is the land of colours, and slaves were scattered round the edge of the was transferred to the celebrated picture of the landscape was an immense panorama, circle, wrapped in their brown cloaks, that the Woman taken in Adultery, and was, we tinged in long sweeps of radiance, as if reached to the ground, and with their fixed believe, considered a portrait of Otho each was the division of a map. Lombardy dark faces and unmoving figures, like so Venius or M. de Vos. It is probably the lay before us on the left, an endless expan- many monuments of stone. The sun was costume of the character, but the precise sion of the green of vineyard and fruit now touching the horizon, and broad gleams fan-like form of the prelatical dress does gardens; then came the true Italian view of fiery light were struggling through the not improve the appearance of the whole; of hills, touched with crimson lights, and heavy clouds that were rolling downwards but the great merit, independent of this in the intervals glimpses of three or four to the hill. In the midst of a sudden glare slight objection, lies in the dignity and cha- remote lakes, that looked like sheets of of rose-coloured and sanguine radiance, ove racter of the head.

sanguined steel.

In front the sun was of the women advanced from the centre of No. XXV. THE INFANT Moses. stooping in full glory upon Milan, and the the dancers, who were grouped on the sumJohn Jackson, R. A.

dome of the Cathedral rose among heavy mit. She was a tall and stately figure, and In this specimen Mr. Jackson has ap- purple clouds, like a pillar of gold ;-the must have once been very handsome. A proved himself an exquisite colourist. There Bolognese hills were the relief of this mag- Greek and stern profile, bold and rapidlyis a lightness and transparency in the tones nificent foreground, and they had the ad-moving eyebrows, large eyes of the deepest of the flesh, which are truly desirable in all ditional depth of being loaded with what black,' a cheek of artificial crimson, and a sulyjects of this nature, and maintain a fine seemed a growing thunderstorm. To all mouth of such dimpled sweetness harmony with the back-ground. The mark- this nothing was wanting but a group of strangely contrasted with the laughty and ing of the neck is too sudden, and gives us banditti, or a procession of pilgrims; and, tragic expression of her general physiogthe idea of a head separated from the as Fortune would have it, we were sud- nomy. We afterwards learned that she body.

denly called from our aerial contemplations was a Turkess who had been sent among XXIX. MEG MERRILIES. to look upon what might have been taken the menials of the Haram for some act of Sir W. Beechy, R. A.

for either. Our guide, whom we sent to violence or revenge. She declaimed a soIn this the artist has not embodied our reconnoitre, soon returned, and told us liloquy of which we did not understand one idea of the Scotch gipsy. Smoothness of that they were redeemed slaves from Al- word, for it was in Arabic. She frequently painting does not accord with a character giers. They seemed a very ferocious troop; pointed to the Heavens, then cast her eyes of so much energy. As we shall hereafter we, however, were numerous enough not round, paused, listened, then gazed up have to pay a tribute of applause to another to feel much alarm, and waited for their wards as if she saw some descending wonpicture by the same hand, we may be ex- coming, which was preluded by a general der; this closed with a prostration. A Tused here giving an opinion that the pre-Pirn for the Bravi Inglesi. They were painter might have made a noble study of sent is a failure.

about 40; some of them had been long in this subject, with the wild gesture and ilXXXVI. AN AFTERNOON's Nap. slavery, and bore the marks of an African lumined figure, the scarlet shawl that F. P. Stephanoff.

sun in their stained and withered complex- crowned her brow, like a wreath of fire in A very clever picture; full of spirit, whe- ions. We soon grew excellent friends, and the sun, and her countenance alternately ther it regards the character and expression heard a multitude of stories of the attack brightening and darkening as if with the spell or technical skill in the art. This little under Lord Exmouth,-unineasured praise within. She might have stood for a Casdomestic intrigue represents a daughter en- of English gallantry, and some strong de- sandra. As she rose the two parties comgaged with a lover while her father is asleep scriptions of the desperation of the Moors, menced singing in turn, and with the same -she is forbidding his entrance, as a dog, and the slaughter within the walls. We style of gesture, turning from Earth to not sleeping so sound as his master, has were generos, as they called it; and, be en. This singular pantomime was to taken the alarm. It is very humorously fore parting, they gave a specimen of their represent the transmission of Mohammed's treatail, and our attention is divided, but, gratitude. They produced two women, sword from the upper world; and, whether at the same time, gratified between the whom, in defiance of all the laws of Algiers from the vengeance of their Moorish masearnestness of the girl and the profoand re- and Mahommed, they had smuggled away, 'ters, or its intrinsic beauty, had been one pose of the father. We wish we could add in the general confusion of their departure, of the tasks imposed on such of the slaves that the contrast was as happily preserved and we were honoured with a dance. The sun as exhibited any “imusic in their souls" to in their colour ; but the mellowness and was now setting, and we became impatient learn. The chorus, hcard at another time richness of the sleeper and all around himn of lingering among the hills, and rather and place, miglit not liave produced any is disturbed by the cold and chalky white suspicious of night in such company. How- very extravagant adıniration, and its inness of the dainsel. Upon the whole, the ever, they insisted that they should be per- strumental part was miserable; but heard subject is full of vigour, and the relief a mitted the honour of exhibiting their tinest under all the circainstances, even the chime great improvement upon some of the ar- specimen of African accomplishinent. They of the mandolines, and the sad and deep tist's preceding performances.

ranged themselves into two partics, with notes of the desert horn, breaking in among

the exception of ten or twelve, who did not voices that in all their captivity were Italian, ORIGINAL POETRY.

consider themselves equal to the display. seemed, in that place of solitude, and in

A few moments were enough for them to the presence of the beings who had themMONTICELLO.

bind their sashes round their heads into selves undergone the “perils by fire, and (From the A/S, Journal of a late Tour on the some resemblance of a turban; their cloaks food, and chains o' the Moor," made up, Continent.)

were filang scarfed round their shoulders, as we all subsequently agreed, the most We had returned froin our excursion on and we found ourselves in the presence of powerful effect that we had ever experienced the lake with something like a determina- what might be easily mistaken for a band from music. On parting they gave us the tion, not the less sincere for its being less of travelling Moors. They had contrived words of their chant, which I send you “ loud than deep,” to look for no more to preserve some mandolines and a wild versified, from a literal translation by our raptures in water excursions ;--but the kind of horn in use among the shepherds friend Hevenings in this country are so proverbially on the borders of the desert. They found THE PROPHET'S SCHMITAR. tine, that one easily forgets the rufilings of out a level spot on the hill side, and com

I see a tempest in the sky, the day. The sun was going down as we menced with a species of chorus and a con The clouds are rushing wild and high! ascended the hill to the Casa Cavaletti, fused dance. This soon ceased, and they 'Tis dark--and clarker still! The moon and, without the usual raptures on orange divided, One of the females headed each Is wanmis fiery red-is gone;

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Along the horizon's edge a ring

luable information on the subject ;-but

CHORUS Of fearful light hangs wavering.

the work to which particular praise is due, Yet all beneath, around, is still,

Now, woe to helm, and woe to shield,

is his admirable Treatise on the Nerves of All as entranc'd-lake, vale, and hill.

That meets it rushing o'er the field; Hark to the thunder-peal!—'Tis past,

Like dust before its edge shall fail

the Breast and Belly, which contains such Scarce echoing on the upward blast:

The temper'd sword, the solid mail ;

delicate and accurate dissections, illustrated The lightnings upward to the pole

Till like a star its glories swell

by plates so excellently finished, that few Roll gorgeous ;- not for us they roll.

In terrors on the Infidel ;

anatomical works can be put in competition Things in that tossing sky have birth

A sun, foredoom'd to pour its rays

with it, and not a single one, of any nation, This hour, that bear no stain of earth.

Till earth is burning in its blaze! C.

be placed above it. Walter opened, as it

were, a new world. His writings greatly The storm descends again !—the peal-

SONNET TO HORNSEY.

enriched the science; but he has left an The lightning's hiss—the whirlwind's swell, At once come deepening on the ear : TVritten cross-wise on the poetical leaf of an old

equally great treasure in his Anatomical The cloud is now a sanguine sphere,

Examiner Newspaper.

Museum, the produce of fifty years indeThat, down a cataract of light,

With what a werry fine aspec does that sweet fatigable labour. His Majesty has purShoots from the summit of the night;

willage by London

chased this cabinet with royal liberality, And glorious shapes along its verge, Hemm'd prettily round with hill, and brook, and and graciously opened it for general inLike meteors flash, ascend, immerge.

spring,

spection. Very few anatomnists have acThe broad, black Heav'n is awed and calm, and stream, and wood, and wale, and all such quired so great a degree of ability: no one The earth sends up its incense-balın,

thing

has completed such a collection by his own The cloud-wreath folds the mountain's brow, Most beautiful, greet us Vilson !-rare place, industry. Mascagni indeed equalled him The lake's long billow sinks below,

where undone

in zeal and talent, but almost the whole of All slumbering, far as eye can gaze, Mortal droops under infirmity

Mascagni's fine preparations are destroyed. In sapphire-one blue, mystic blaze! To lead him to eternity!

Whose copse and white-washt cottage, snugly Walter's collection remains, a noble monnThey come ! - Whence swept that sound, so mingles,

ment of German industry, and may subsist near,

Just like those worry pretty little Boxes for centuries. Many of his views may perSo sweet, it pains the mortal ear?

That o'erhangs the Surrey Canal lockses, haps be now no longer approved ; but this A sound that on the spirit flings

Where Sydenham's shady-woods right o'er 'em fate is com:yon to him with all those who A spell, to open all its springs.

dingles

labour in the experinental sciences, in (That sound thou'lt hear no more, till rise Most beautiful !--and 0, how it would puzzle which every succeeding day brings with it Thine own white wings in Paradise.) My brain to tell thee, Vilson, half the sweets of

new improvements; but whoever is versed List to the song the Genii pour,

Muzzle As from yon airy isle they soar, Hill !—Enough :-0 bare me hence, ere life shall in his branch of science, will always hold

Walter's name in high honour, for he has Chanting alternate, height o'er height,

sever, Halo on halo, diamond bright, Ye Powers Dewine! that I may live for ever.

produced works that are masterpieces in The strain that told, from star to star,

WALTER. their kind, and greatly extended the bounds They brought the talisman of war,

of our knowledge." The Prophet's matchless Scymitar!

TO WALTER SCOTT,

On hearing it said that he, like Buonaparte, had PROFESSOR SEBALDUS RAN, Allah il Allah!-high in Heaven,

lost his laurels on the field of Waterloo. Might to the MIGHTIEST be given ! Oh why should they say that thy bright wreath

"l'trecht, January 11, 1818. Mohammed, Prophet, Prince, be thine

is faded ! On earth Dominion's master-sign! That on Waterloo's plain, it has wither'd and learned Professor Sebaldus Ran, at the ad

· Yesterday evening died here the very On thy bold brow no jewell'd band

dried ? No sceptre in thy red right-hand ;

Why couple thy name with a tyrant's degraded, vanced age of 93 years and 3 months. Forth-and fulfil thy destiny!

And say that with his, thy fair laurels have died? | First as Lecturer, and afterwards as ProThe Scymitar descends for ihee.

fessor, of Oriental Literature, he had taught Oh no!—they still live—thou dear Poct of Na- in our High School with extraordinary re

ture!
(However detraction or envy abuse)

putation and success for the long period of Hail, holy Scymitar! thy steel In verdure they triumph o'er prejudic'd satire,

sixty years, and had enjoyed, for about Is lightning's flash, and thunder's peal ! And crown thee the pride of the Caledon muse.

eight years, the repose which he had so Mary. well merited. Of all the Professors who

have attained a great age, either here or Nor mortal force, nor earthly flame

elsewhere, in our country, Ran is the old. Wake in the mine its mighty frame: Its mine was in the tempest's gloom,

BIOGRAPHY.

est, and had besides the good fortune to

retain to the last moment the entire posIts forge was in the thunder's womb. To give its hue, the eclipsing moon

PROFESSOR WALTER,

session of his intellectual facnlties. 'He In brief and bloody splendour shone ;

was a man of the most extensive learning, The comet, rushing from its steep,

particularly in the manners and customs of Trac'd thro' the Heav'n the steel's broad

The two following letters announce the the East and the Jewish antiquities, and sweep.

deaths of two of the oldest Professors in generally celebrated for it, so that the Europe, both in the beginning of January High School of l'trecht will always have 1818.

reason to boast of him as one of its greatest Prince of the starry diadem,

Berlin, Jan. 6. ornaments. Mildness of disposition, piety, Where found its blade the burning gleam ? “On the 4th of this month, Berlin lost and a truly serious spirit, distinguished GENIE.

one of its most celebrated men, by the him, and enabled him to bear, with exem

death of M. Privy-Counsellor Walter, First plary resignation, the severe loss of a beTwas edged upon the living stone

Professor of Physics, Anatomy, and Mid- loved son. All the lovers of true learning That lights the tomb of Solomon ;

wifery, and Member of the Academy of who were acquainted with him,-his numThen, rising, temper'd in the wave That floats thro' Mecca's holy cave.

Sciences. He was in the 84th year of his berless scholars, as many at least as surAbore-apon its hilt were graven

age, being born at Königsberg, in Prussia, vive him,—his numerous friends, and still The potent characters of Heaven;

on the 1st of July 1734. His Osteology is surviving descendants and relations, will Then, on the footsteps of the THRONE a model of accurate description, founded never cease to entertain the highest respect 'Twas laid ;-it blaz'd, the charm was done. on profound knowledge, and full of va- and honour for his memory.”

GENIE.

CHORUS.

GENIE.

OF BERLIN.

CHORUS.

REMARKS ON THE MEXICO AND TITE

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SKETCHES OF SOCIETY.

organs being spoiled, as I have said, by lowed to confine them, but by no means to their own.

For my part, I was always inflict on them corporal punishment. very happy when I had an opportunity to I even knew an instance in which a

put in motion the voluble tongues of the Spanish officer of justice, in the actual MEXICAN LANGI'AGE.

native Mexicans; and in my walks or exercise of his functions, was pelted with (By M. Sonneschmid.)

journeys I seldom let a pretty Mexican wo stones by some rioters of the lower class of Buffon, in his Natural IIistory, mention with which I ras, however, usually well he cansed corporal punishment to be in

man pass me without enquiring my road, different casts : having obtained assistance, ing the Mexican names of quadrupeds, acquainteil. On these occasions, I not Nicteil on says, “The Mexican language is extremely only admired the mild, obliging, and yet

some of the ringleaders who

were taken in the fact : for this he was not barbarous.” Even great men are liable to

lively characters of these good people, but only deprived of his office, but sentenced error, and the learned Naturalist has, on this occasion, been guilty of one of no

took also particular delight in their pleas- to pay a considerable fine, because he was mean importance ; for the Mexican lan- ing and melodions pronunciation of the not authorised to act as he had done with

many zatl, olin, litzle, zincatl, huil, mot out the previous approbation of the royal guage, as pronounced by the natives, is so

zin, zomatli, calipatl, paliri, lotli, huat), government of the country (Real Audiennorous and agreeable, and is distinguished oztải, titlan, pamtili, zintli, which occur in | cia); and this respectable tribunal nerer to its advantage among all the Indian lantheir language.

authorises corporal punishment till the afguages with which I have become ac

As I mention the good Mexicans, ill-in-fair is enquired into, proved, and found to quainted. A person whose organs of speechi lave of this people; and it may therefore not be formed persons will perhaps pity the fate be a case calling for such remedy.

I shall be happy if these feir remarks been rendered pliant by the ditlicult pro: I useless to combat this error beforehand. should contribute to make people judge of nunciation of his own mother tongue, will Nothing so incessantly occupied my atten- nations, their character and relations, more pronounce the most difficult words of the tion as the condition of the natives of that favourably than has sometimes been the Mexican language in a pleasing and cor

country.

I often risiter them in their case; and intend, at a future time, to comrect manner; but by, no means attain the houses, their huts, and in some caves in municate farther observations on that counextremely fluent, rapid, and agreeable pro- which they live voluntarily and contentedly. try, which deserves, on many accounts, lo nunciation of the native and real Mexicans. On the great canal of Mexico, in the mar be called the New World. Thus, for instance, I myself, in the first kets, where numbers of them come for the

SOXNESCHMD. years after my arrival in that country, pro- purposes of buying and selling, I frequently nounced the most difficult Mexican words, mingled with them to observe them, and after once hearing them, so perfectly, that always found a very urbane, cheerful, and

TIFLIS. my Spanish friends living in Mexico were contented people, whom nobody, whether From the journal of a German Traveller much surprised at it, and were not able to

European or Creole, may abuse. They who has recently visited Tiflis, we extract do the same. But after I had lived some

are, happily, protected by the laws. Who- the following observations on that city, and years in New Spain, and spoken little or

erer ill treats a Mexican, is immediately the part of Russia in which it is situated : no German, my organs of speech were so

thrown into a prison as a criminal, and Our caravan spent eight days in prospoiled by the easy and soft pronunciation of the Spanish, that I found it dillicult and ever, are certainly very rare; for the of about 250 wersts; but if due attention

severely punished. Such occurrences, hoiv- ceeding from Mosdak to Tiflis, à distance almost impossible to pronounce, with ease Spanish nation is the most humane that I were paid to the state of the roads, the and propriety, a Mexican word that was at know, and its general characteristic is the journey might certainly be accomplished in all difficult ; as, for instance, Xicalquuhuill greatest abhorrence of oppression of a one half the time. Tinis is accounted one (the name of a tree peculiar to the country.) fellow-creature, whether his complexion be of the finest cities in Asia, yet the streets The same circumstance was the cause white or black, yellow or brown.t

are so extremely narrow, that it would lie that, on my return to my own country, no Respecting what has passed in former impossible to drive a carriage through the body took me for a German, and many af- tines,' I can give no testimony, though best of them. The houses, which have no firmed that I was a foreigner, who had but everything shews that many circumstances regular roofs

, are built of the clay used for just begun to learn German; though I had have been exaggerated, and represented in making bricks, mixed with gravel : the never forgotten the Gerinan, and still fan incredibly odious colours. I speak only of windows are small, and distributed without cied that I pronounced it correctly. How

a later period of twelve years, and I have any attention to regularity. As the exterever, I suffered very much by it, and when

great satisfaction in saying, that in my long nal walls of the houses are never plastered, I had been speaking German for a con and repeated visits to the Nlexican mines the town presents a gloomy and even dirty siderable time, felt unpleasant sensations, and smelting-houses, I never found a slave appearance. The houses are generally two particularly in the jawbones, which are

in them; and that many owners of mines stories high, and cartlı huts are exceedingly more frequently exercised in speaking our do not even punish the almost daily em

There are many churches iii language than in speaking Spanish.

bezzlement of rich gold and silver ore, but Tiflis, but they are neither large nor splenFrom these remarks I think it clearly content themselves with taking back what did. The market, or buzaur, according to appears why the Mexican language should is stolen, and letting the culprits go, though, Asiatic custom, is held in one of the prinseem barbarous to a Frenchman, who per- when they are caught in the fact, it is alcipal streets, which is covered over from haps did not even recollect that, in the

one end to the other with a wooden roof, Mexican as in the Spanish, X must be pronounced like G, Z like S, &c. 1, at least, + Besides my own twelve years experience, ! intended apparently to protect the shops should be very much surprised if a French might confirm this assertion by the testimony of from the scorching rays of the sun.

the buzaur merchandize of every descripman praised this language, which does not many iinpartial travellers, who have not gone as please the Spaniards, on account of their enemies to Spain and its Colonies. I will quote tion is sold; fruit, vegetables, silks, shawis,

only Langsdorf's Observations on : Voyage and wine, are frequently displayed on thie

round the World, in the years 1803 to 1807, same stall. In one corner a sinith has esta* for an interesting account of the Mexican Part II. : -" The rural, unaffected simplicity of lished his workshop, from which the sparks Glaciers, by this gentlem:ın, see Nos. 31 and 32 these good people (at San Francisco) charmed us issue in every direction in the very fuces of of the Literary Gazette. The present paper af so much, that we immediately felt an interest in the passengers. Tuilors, locksmiths, and fords a view of Mexican manners, so opposite to the acquaintance with the individuals, and took what we are accustomed to entertain, that from a lively share in the happiness of this amiable goldsmiths, pursue their avocations in the a resident in that country of twelve years stand family." What is here said of one family, I can open air, except when rainy or windy wea. ing, it seems at this moment to merit peculiar certify of the whole Spanish nation in Europe ther obliges them to take shelter beneail

the roof with which the street is covered. attention.-EDITOR.

and America.

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numerous.

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