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THE FINE ARTS.

of congruity in tlie componeht parts. The We must credit Mt. Green-for la very

figure of Moses, for whom the surrounding pleasing composition, in which are thrown THE BRITISH INSTITUTICY. scenery and subordinate figures were created, together a female, a glass of gold fish, and

(we cannot believe he was made for them) a cat „The lady occupies the center, and No. 6.

is the inost mean' and Inferior;-a feeble may be supposed to be placed there for the No. CLXVIII.' The DAY AFTER The Patr. old man expressing a feeble resentment; purpose of defeating the fell and feline inL. Clennell,

instead of the ineensed messenger of God, tentions of grimalkin, which are pretty eviWe should have been very sorry to have, favoured race. The tables of the law are epigraph about "hoine" and philosophy

and the great legislator of a peculiar and dent. But what all this has to do with his had this old say applied to us, in conse, broken, but frow? They appear as if they we are at a loss to guess. We will take it quence of our overlooking this modest and had been cut into skilful diagrams, or had for granted that the lady is at home, and unassuming but highly meritorious work crumbled of their own securd under the intends to keep there, which certainly does of art. The scene has all the appropriate hand of time, not as if they had been dashed require some philosophy on her part, concircumstances attendant, uppn the removal in pieces by the holy fury of the angry pro- sidering the propensity to gadding sa of booths, barrels, bottles, and all the phet. Had we spoken of this work as a falsely attributed to the female character; various et ceteras belonging to the business landscape" alone, we inust have expressed the fishes are, philosophers per force, and and furniture of a fair; and they are exe- the warmést admiration of its general ef- in their silence prove their relatiquship to uuted in the best manner. A carpexter is fect, and more especially of the beauty of the greatest of ancient schools. The cat is in conversation with a countryman, which the distance, tian which we never saw any certainly an emblem of home, but not as evidently relates to the price of materials thing entitled to more unqualified approba- bere applied, Nir. Stothard, in his picture of for erecting the stadlsWomen with their, tion.

the Deserted Village, has by a master-stroke half-packed clothing and lumber are seated on the ground, and the horses, stand ready CCLXVII. Cain : "Where is my brother imparted great interest by the introduction to remove the multifarious encumbrançes of

The Same.

of this domestic animal--the cat remains

on the outside of the closed door, while the the motley mart. The management of We hope his brother will not come, for mournful group, followed by the

faithful light, shade, and effect, is judicious and this picture is better without its fellow. dog; are taking their departure. This is clear. The countryman stands with his The landscape' is not in the true character an affecting incident, We repeat, the prebaek towards the spectator; his şınock- of its subject

. - Dark .clouds, yvhence issue sent is a very pleasing picture, but has too frock reçeiying the light, and conducting bright lights, are not suficient. There inuch of still life in the principal figure, the eye to that point, This figure Lolds a should lie more of gloom and obscurity to and does not answer the motto under which dog which carries it off, and moderates in accompany the dreadful question. There it is painted. A little more vigour of pensome degree the abruptness of its form, is also something tiery puerile in conduet-cil and character would improve it much, The general tone of colour is grave; a mass ing a ray of light ro a simple Abwer; the of trees receives the objects, and relieves incident takes from the character of the

XXXI. THE BOMBARDNENTOR ALGIERS: the, several characters which compose this piece, without adding any thing to the gem

23 trin PH.'Rogers clever group, while some patches of lively neral effect. The figure of. Cain has much colour in the draperies in the foreground of the frantic, but ought surely to have been

This: inay, bei a representation of the short, nothing characteristic of the subject sanctioned this at any age of the world, whether it is day or night; but fellows, like give spirit and vivacity to the whole. In more elevated) Poetical licence would hard scene, but has in no other respect interest

as a picture, Jye-confess we camot tell seems to be omitteds, but it was absolutely necessary among “ the

us, who sit at home in their studies, have no XIII. A BOY EATING Oxstens.-E. Childe first of men.” We have delivered our opi- right to criticise thiese dreatfil. frașs.

Had this artist been content to have much talent displayed in these and in his placed lis crabs, lobsters, and red herrings other pictures, (Nos. 62. 198. and 290.)

XXXII. Torch-light.-John Sterens. on a stall, and left them to speak for

This is a boy holding a torch, with some themselves, we have no doubt they would CXCII. The Mill.-George Jones, cffect of ligbt; but such a subject requires have been properly appreciated. We ac- We select this from the six subjects exhi-abler treatinent to become worthy of inuch knowledge we have seldom seen any thing bited by Mr.

Jones, because it does most notice. If Mr. S. aims to produce any of the kind, eren from the pencils of the honour to his talent, though his sketches thing great in this way, he must study best Flemish masters, which go beyond shew some promise, and his cottages are Schalcken, and Wright of Derby thein. Our painter has, however, unluckily very pretty. With regard to our selected XC. A VIEW FROM THE HARBOUR of Cox, brought the human form and countenance subject, as on the fairest 'surface the small

STANTIXOTLE, &c. TAKEN IN 1816. into the piece; and his management of est spot is visible, so in the clearest and this part of his subject is every way the re more perfect works of art, the least devia

Aliss Eliza Maskull. verse of his still life. Hoping for his better tion from harmony and keeping is sopnest It is said that Michael Angelo, in giving judgment in furture, we cannot help apply-obserred. A small speck throws the eye his opinion of oil painting, said it was only ing the lines of Mr. Hoppner on a similar from its repose ; and it is thus that in this fit for women ; doubtless implying the fackoccasion: when speaking of the French truly beautiful picture of Mr. Jones, our first lity with which inaccura-ies might be obliSchool, he sarcastically remarks, notice is of the bird, which seems to stick to terated. "He painted in fresco, which adWhere broad-cloth breathes, to tulk.where cu- the wing of the windmill, instead of being mits of little or no alteration, and which reshions strive,

budyant in the air, and separated from all quires not only celerity but correctness. In And all but Şir and Madam are alive. solid objects. The woman coming down our day, with less severe notions, we are

A few other performances, of pigs, goats, the slope is also a little too short. But inclined to think differently of the practice, &c. by the sume, are of considerable inerit with these triflug exceptions, evincing only and when a female steps into this line of

that we look closest where we admire most, painting, she has to our mind, gone out of CLXXXI. Moses BREAKING THE TA- we are ready to bestow on this picture the the ordinary track, and given proofs of per, BLES. - A. Aglio.

meed of our highest approbation. It is in- severance and resolution which are entitled This histat al landscape (we say so, though deed a delightful production.

to great praise. We have therefore much its essenis stribute is not very definite) CCLXXXVII. Paruosorty at HOME; or pleasure in paying a tribute to female talent in whic

Voscs is introduced, Domestic COMFORTS. --James Green. in the performance before us, which would

uring is rich and harbor

Man inny for wealth or glory roum,

do credit to artists of higher professional " generally, of But woman must be blest at home; name. Inascene of splendour and

commercial res the 'charmi

To this should all her studies tend; activity, Miss M. has produced an etfect of ends,

ough the want This her great object and ber end. - Angene. I warmth and glow suitable to the climate.

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of the Samanides,dals in the cabinet of three rolls of paper, only two of which are M. Potot, which has been

say, 'the magnetic pole was so much to the ice contains no salt, yet the length be inspired them with sufficient con. Therefore, the ice which covers the Pro. / and should this prove to be the case, we

Art. VII.-C. M. freehnii Rostochiensis | charms, and all the talents, which Madame THE ROYAL INSTITUTION. de Nomorum Bulgaricorum forté, antic de Stael gives to her Corinna.

To the Editor. baquissimo libri duo, g c ...

The Diario Romano announces the arrival SIR, !!? M. Fraelin, Professor in the University of of Father Angelo di Polli, a Franciscan

I have observed the notice you have Casan, is already known to the amateurs of monk, who has been twelve years as a taken of my Lectures, 'in common with the the literature, and particularly of the Nus missionary in Egypt. Among other curiosi- others, which have been delivered during

ties which he has brought with him, are the the present season at the Royal Institution, mismatology, of

East, by the the

descrip: tion which he has given in Arabic, of dress of covering of a mummy, ornamented and beg to thank you for the encomiums several coins of the princes of the dynasty glyphics. Under this dress there were 1 feel they are but ill deserved.

by the most

From the candour I have universally obpublished under in good preservation; they contain, as far served in your criticisms, I am sure you the title of Numophylucium Orientale Poto-as can be observed superficially, some will not permit a report, which was incortianum. Several other dissertations have account of the life of the deceased in hiero; rectly printed in your last Number, "to shewn;' tliat he has profited by a residence glyphic characters. When these rolls shall stand uncontradicted before the public, esof several years in a country where an in be properly unfolded and examined, as well pecially as it must at once declare my ignotercourse with the Mussulman Tartars, and as those which are in the Museum al Paris, rance of the subject upon which I svas treatthe monuments of the ancient power of the and which were also brought from Egypt, ing. I allude to your account of

my last Moguls, afford valuable assistance towards it is hoped that it will be possible to give a lecture, in which you make ine's

to say, the "stnáy of the languages and history of more detailed explanation of them. These that the first time the variation was accuthe East. This work of M. Fraehy's is the with, and appear to be written in languages found to be about 110 MSS. are the oldest that we are acquainted rately noticed was in 1575,' wlien it was

that is to variety and solidity of the knowledge, the that are entirely unknown. judicious criticisin, and the excellent

east of the north Pole of the earth » &c.

LEARNED, SOCIETIES. method which distinguish it. But as the

(See the passage alluded to; p. 154, of your principal subject is not very interesting,

last paper. and we cannot enter into the details which the following gentleinen were adınitted to riatioti was first noticed by Norman in 1576, OXFORD, March 7.-On Wednesday last What I stated was, that the magnetic

dvaconstitute its real merit, we merely observe, that it treats 'on ''some silver and copper

Degrees: coins of the city of Bulgar. Mr. F. had Esq. Fellow of Oriel. College grand com- have been in that part of its

when it was 11° 15' to the east of London,

NASTERS OF ARTS.-Robert Ingham, consequently the magnetic pole inust then designed to publish a dissertation on that pounder; Rev. Francis Pott, of St. John's round the North Pole, which would pro

revolution ancient city; but circumstances having College; Rev. Anthony Charles Payler, of duce this angle as viewed from London, obliged him to defer this intention, he has Merton College; Rev. Charles Blencowe, and not that the Poles were really so far thought it worth the while to publish the of Lincoln College; Rev. John Kingdon, distant from each other! With' respect to present dissertation separately. M. F. is of Exeter College. appointed successor to the learned Tychsen,

the alteration in variation, 'it cannot with at Rostock; but will first pass some time

BACHELOR OPARTS.--Mr. Philip Buck

any certainty be taken as you state, at about at St. Petersburg, where the Academy has ley Edwards, of Brasennose College.

**** given him the honorable commission to

myself, because from the year 1072 to 1790 class and describe the Oriental medals in

ARTS AND SCIENCES.":the variation at London angmented in round its rich cabinet, from which we may justly

Pintor mimbers about 2 degrees in each year, while

i li qed POLAR IÇE. expect a work of the highest importance.

for the last 39 years, it has only increased PROFESSOR PARROT, in Dorpat, has 1 degree 2 minutes, it having been 23° 34' TETO written on the freezing of the salt water, in 1790, while it is but 24 36at the preORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE in respect to the origin of the Polar Ite. sent time, and the period of 82 years which hm 10 VITI 100 Inny1 Thongh navigators say that the Polar gou mention has arisen from a misconcep

tion of my meaning. I stated a curious but jam tante vs Rome, Feb. 7,

author

coincidence which I had noticed, that from The Propaganda has received accounts thinks and proves that mere tasting 1576, when the variation was first observed, from a Capuchin missionary, who has peno, cannot decide the problem. If the ice to 1657, when the line of no variation trated into the deserts of Bahia: "After in the Pular regions contains no salt, it passed London, was a period of 81 years having travelled a long time, he met with a tribe of savages, who, being entirely se

cannot be frozen sea water, but ice of during which the eastern variation had decluded from all others, live more like brute glaciers, which cover the Pole of our creased 11° 15', and that from 1657 to the beasts than rational creatures. Father Lul- earth, and to which our Ruropean gla- period, being 161 years, in which time the

present year, was very nearly double that dovico found himself surrounded by fifty- ciers are mere nole-hills. The unsalt | needle had acquired very nearly a double three 'savages, men and women. They water flowing from the glaciers is lighter quantity of western variation, viz. 240 30"; were quite naked, and all armed with bows than the sea water, and consequently and being now at its maximun, there was and arrows. The inissionary endeavoured keeps on the surface, makes the latter every reason to suppose that the general to concilate them by little presents ; at less salt, and thus dire liable to freeze. periods of increase and decrease were equal; them to accompany

of to the nearest habitations. He there baptized lar regionis must increase, and continue England again in 161 years, or in 1979; but eight of their children, with the consent of to increase, every year, in heigħat and as an entire traverse of the needle from the their parents. Another monk having joined extent ; for this reason the climate extreme E. and, W. points of variation had Father Ludovico, these two missionaries of Iceland and Greenland becomes con- not been observed since the variation was will

attempt penetrate further into the tinually more severe, and those coun: discovered, it was impossible to come to interior of the country. This enterprise tries luse more and wore of the inhabita- any decisive conclusions on this head. may be as advantageous to the sciences to religion. ble surface, &c.

Your obliged and obedient Servant un [This is a very different hypothesis de pers A young Improvisatrice, named Rosa

Joux Millington, Taddes, is at this moment, the object of from that recently so ably maintained Uper Mall, Hammersmith, not witings general admiration, She possesses au the I by the Quarterly Review.)

March 9, 1818.

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THE FINE ARTS.

of congruity in the component parts. The We'must \credit Mr. Green-for a very

figure of Moses, 'for whom the surrounding pleasing composition, in which are thrown THE BRITISH INSTITUTIO.Y. scenery and subordinate figures were created, together a female, a glass of gold fish, and

(we cannot believe 'he was made for them), a cat. The lasly, occupies the center, and No. 6.

is the inost mean' and inferior ;-a feeble may be supposed to be placed there for the No. CLXVIII

. The Day After the Fair: Cold man expressing a freeble resentment purpose of defrating the fell and feline in

L. Çlennell, We should have been very sorry to have furoured race. The tables of the law are epigraph about “home” and philosophy

and the great legislator of a peculiar and dent. But what all this has do with his had this old say'applied to us, in conse, broken, but crow? They appear as if they we are at a loss to guess. We will take it quence of our overlooking this modest and had been cut into skilful diagrams, or had for granted that the lady is at home, and unassuming but highly meritorious work crumbled of their own securd under the intends to keep there, which eertainly does of art. The scene has all the appropriate hand of time, not as if they had been dashed require some philosophy on her part, concircumstances attendant, upon the removal in pieces by the holy fury of the angry pro- sidering the propensity ito gadding so of booths, barrels, bottles, and all the various et ceteras belonging to the business , landscape" alone, we must have expressed The fishes

are philosophers per force, and and furniture of a fair ; ; and they are exe-' the warmest admiration of its general ef- in their silence prove their relationship to cuted in the best manner. A carpeuter is fect, and more especially of the beauty of the greatest of ancient schools. The cat is in conversation with a countryman, which the distance, than which we 'never saw any certainly an emblem of home, but not as evidently

, relates to the price or materials thing entitled to more unqualified approba- bere applied. Nr. Stothard, in his picture of for erectiug the stalls, Women with their, tion. half-packed clothing and lumber are, seated on the ground, and the horses stand ready CCLXVII. CAIN: “Where is my brother imparted great interest by the introduction to remove the multifarious encụmbrances of

The Same.

of this domestic animal the cat remains the motley inart. The management of

on the outside of the closed door, while the

We hope his brother will not come, for mournful group, followed by the faithful light, shade, and effect, is judicious and this picture is better without its fellow. dog, are taking their departure. This is clear. The countryman stands with his The landscape is not in the true character an affecting incident. We repeat, the prebaek towards the spectator;, his sinock- of its subject

. :- Dark clouds, whence issue sent is a very pleasing picture, but has too, frock receiving the light, and conducting bright lights, are not sufficient. There much of still life in the principal figure, the eye to that point. This figure holds a should be more of gloom and obscurity to and does not answer the motto under which dog which carries it off, and moderates in accompany the dreadful question. There it is painted. A little more vigour of pensome degree the abruptness of its form. is also something thery puerile in conduct cil and character would improve it much, The general tone of colour is grave; a mass ing a ray of light of a simple flower ; the of trees receives the objects, and relieves incident takes from the character of the XXXI. The BOMBARDMENT OP ALGIERS: the several characters which compose this piece, without adding any thing to the gen

" P. H."Rogers

I. clever, group, while some patches of lively neral effect. The figure of Cain has much

This may be a representation of the colour in the draperies in the foreground of the frantic, but ought surely to have been give spirit and vivacity to the whole. In more elevated Poetical lieence would have scene, but has, in no other respect interest short, nothing characteristic of the subject sanctioned this at any age of the world, whether it is day or night; but fellows, like

as a picture. We-confess we camot tell seems to be omitted,...

but it was absolutely necessary among “ the XIII. A Box Eating Oysters. E. Childe. first of men.” We have delivered our opi-, who sit at home in their studies, have no Had this artisť been content to have much talent displayed in these and in his

nion freely of this artist, because there is right to criticise thiese drearlful frays..., placed lis crabs, lobsters, and red lierrings, other pictures, (Nos. 62. 198. and 290.)

XXXII. Torci-light.-John Sterens. on a stall, and left them to speak for

This is a boy holding a torch, with some themselves, we have no doubt they would CXCII. The Mill.-George Jones,

effect of light; but such a subjeet requires have been properly appreciated. We ac- We select this from the six subjects exhi-abler treatinent to become worthy of much knowledge we have seldom seen any thing bited by Mr. Jones, because it does most notice. If Mr. S. aims to produce any of the kind, cren from the pencils of the honour to his talent, though his sketches thing great in this way, he must study best "Flemish masters, which go beyond shew some promise, and his cottages are Schalcken, and Wright of Derby. thein. Our painter has, however, unluckily very pretty. With regard to our selected XC. A VIEW FROM THE HARBOUR of Conhrought the human form and countenance subject, as on the 'fairest surface the small

STANTINOPLE, &c. TAKEN IN 1816. into the picce; and his management of est spot is visible, so in the clearest and this part of his subject is every way the re

Hot! Aliss Eliza Muskull, more perfect works of art, the least deviaverse of his still lifc. Hoping for his better tion from harmony and keeping is sopnest It is said that Michael Angelo, in giving judgment in future; we cannot help apply- observed. A small speck throws the eye his opinion of oil painting, said it was only ing the lines of Mr. Hoppner on a similar from its repose ;, and it is thus that in this fit for women ; doubtless implying the facioccasion: when speaking of the French truly beautiful picture of Mr. Jones, our first lity with which iảiaccuraries might be obliSchool, he sarcastically remarks,

notice is of the bird, which seems to stick to terated. He painted in fresco, which adWhere broad-cloth breathes, to talk where cu the wing of the windinill, instead of being mits of little or no alteration, and which reshions strive,

buoyant in the air, and separated from all quires not only celerity bụt correctness. In And all but Sir and Madam are alive. solid objects. The woman coming down our day, with less severe notions, we are

A few other performances, of pigs, goats, the slope is also a little too short. But inclined to think differently of the practice, &c. by the sume, are of.considerable merit with these trifling exceptions, evincing only and when a female steps into this line CCLXXXI. Moses BREAKING THE TA- we are ready to bestow on this picture the the ordinary track, and given proofs of per,

that we look closest where we admire most, painting, she has to our mind, gone ont of BLES.-H. Aglio.

meed of our highest approbation. It is in- severance and resolution which are entitled This historical landscape (we say so, though deed a delightful production.

to great praise. We have therefore much its essential attribute is not very definite) |CCLXXXVIII. PHILOSOPHY AT HOMÉ; or pleasure in paying a tribute to female talent in which the figure of Moses is introduced, Domestic COMFORTA.-James Green. in the performance before us, which would has great' merit: the colouring is rich and

Man may for wealth or glory rodm,

do credit to artists of higher professional harmonious; and the forms, generally, of But woman must be blest at home; uame. In asceneofsplendour and

commercial a grand character. But here the 'charm

To this shopld all her studiçs tendl; activity, Miss M. bas produced an etfect of ends, as is ofte. the case, through the want This her greut object and her end. - Nugent. I warmth and glow suitable to the climate.

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The sun's place is within the picture; fine arts. We are not acquainted with any 197. THE STAR. practice adopted by Claude and Rubens recent publications which do so much credít How brilliant on the Ethiop brow of Night and other eminent masters with occasional to the artist. The subjects are well chosen, Beams yon fix'd Star, whose intermitting blaze, success, for to succeed in this is no ordi- anđ 'ably executed. There is a degree of Like Woman's changeful eye, now shuns our nary task. In general the glitter upon the elegance and grace about them, which gaze, foreground objects distracts the attention;, seems incompatible with the idea of a

Tlien sparkles forth in loveliness of Kight. and it requires deep and broad masses to manufacturing city, and yet they are per In size a spangle on the Tyrian

stole

Still-twinkling speck! thou seemest to my sight oppose or bring out the effect of sunshine, fect portraits. They are finished in a style of Majesty, 'mid hosts more mildly bright, and this glitter and want of contrast at so completely to resemble drawings, that Altho' of worlds the centre and the soul! taches in some degree to the work of this none but an experienced eye can discover Sure 'twas a thing for Angels to have scen, lady. There appears also a want of per- the difference. In short, they seem to us When God did hang those lustres thro' the sky spective in the boat, part of which is bid to be a triumph in the manner of aquatint Suris, founts of life! and Darkness sought to by those nearest the eye, or base of the engravings in this country; in which it'is picture. There is too much light upon it to pleasing to thiuk that we have now rivalled With dusky wing her dazed

zed and Haggard eye.in be found in any object with which the sun the very foremost of our continental com In vain, for, pierced with myriad shafts, 'she is brought into competition. The trans- petitors. The execution in this respect,

died; polished substance, alone can reflect the rays original views, combine to render these Doom'd all the day in Ocean's caves to hide. parent medinim of water, or some highly the tone of colour, and the beauty of the And now her timid Ghost dares odly brood of that bright luminary. Upon the whole worthy of our highest panegyric, and of Thou bürning Axle of a star-verged Wheel ! the work does honour to female genius. public admiration, far beyond what local Dost thóm afflict the Beings of thy tay od fahrir (To be continged,)

scenery can generally aspire to win. With feelings such as earth-born Wretches feef lub

Príde, passion, hate, distrust and agony ?
SUTI 29 ENGRAVED PRINTS,

ARTISTS"GENERAL benevolent Fund." Do any weep o'er Blighted hopes - or cirse
The annual dinner for the promotion of Doth Malice, keener than Assassin's knife;

The hour thy light first 'usherd them to life?!! Our attention was called, by an advertise this fund, took place on Thursday week, Stati in the dark?' br seeming friendship, worse ment in our last Number, to the publication and was attended by about a hundred and Skill'd ronnd the heart with " serpent coil to of several new engravings ; and, consistently sixty persons. The Gentleman who did us wind—115mirin 10 min with our plan of noticing works of merit the kindness to be present on our behalf, Forsake and leare' his sleepless sting behind? in this line as they appear, we take leave to gives' us, we are sorry to say, a rather un- No! if I deem'd it I should cease to look offer a few remarks on these productions, favourable account of the proceedings of Beyond tlic scene where thousarids know those great credit to thic branches of art to which little order and regularity preserved; that Nor longer read'that brightly-letter'd book they belong. The two first mentioned owing to the necessarily early secession of Which licaven unfolds - whose paigę of beauty Views are the Ruins of Elgin and of Lin-the Duke of Sussex from the chair, some The breast with hope of an immortal lot; dasfarne Cathedrals z: well engraved from confusion arose, which hindered the chief When tears are dried, and injuries forgot! paintings by Mr. William Wilson; to whom, business of the day, from being clearly and Oh! when the soil, 'nó longer exrthward weğgh’d, in this instance, one of the most distin- successfully carried through; in fine, that Exults tow'rd heaten on swift seraphic wingguished.connoisseurs in the arts in Great most of the party seemed bent on their in- Among the joys past man's imagining, Britain, the Prince Regent, has accorded dividual pursuits, and did not sacrifice It may be one to scan, o'er space display'd, the marked honour of his immediate pa enough to that forbearance, without which, Those wondrous works our blindness now do tronage. We do not mention this as the social comfort is unknown to a mimerous The awful secrets written in the Stars! R. sanction of an illustrious sovereigo, but as and mixed company." Notwithstanding the testimony of an individual of the finest these drawbacks, we rejoice to learn that taste, which carries great weight with it to the subscription was considerable.

1: THE COMET. all acquainted with the state of our national school. In point of fact, we find these the assembly, appears, as reported to us, Behold! amidst you wildorness of stars » The tone taken by those wlio addressed

Regnorum eversor rubuit 'tet hale Comeres. Views very beautiful. Lindas farne iš a pe- to have bordered too closely upon enliarly fine subjeet, and has betu very begging. The unfortunate in the arts are The inner skies, whilst the Sun sleeps by night)

(Angels and bright-eyed deities, that guard finely treated; Elgin is also a striking entitled to higher consideration. They is one unlike the restạmishapén--redremnant of ancient splendour ; and both claim our compassion; but ought to be And wandering from its golden course. It seems prints, with the four which preceded them, treated in a way to shew that they are some spirit from the nether world hath 'scaped form an interesting series of Northern also entitled to our respect. It is displeas- Heaven's vigilance, and mixed with purer forms monastic architectiưe, including the fine ing to hear them spoken of like common To work there deeds of evil." If Sybils now Abbiegs at Melrose, Kelso, Dryburgh, and beggars. One poem was recited by Mr. Brenthed their dark dracles, or nations bent," : Jedburgh. bargaması2 till 2.2.Thomson, and another was distributed, on

As once they bent, before Apollo's shrine, The two other works which claim our this occasion. In conclusion, a ruse was

And owned the frenzied priestess' anguries, notice, are views of Glasgow, from draw- played off, which we do not believe is what might not this portend? --Changes, and acts ings by Mr. Wilson, engraved in aqua-tinta common in such cases : as the company Soine sudden end to this fair formed creation by C. Bennett, and coloured. Were we not retired, they were invited to drink a cup of Or half the globe made desolate. Behold! aware that such things oecupy a long time tea or coffee, and if they accepted the invi- It glares-how like an omen. 'If that I in producing, we could fancy that these tation, they were charged eighteenpence for Could for a tine forget myself in fable," delightful pictures were painted to illustrate their politeness. This was rather' severe (Indian or Heathen storieit

) I could fancy, Rob Roy, or that Rob Roy was written to upon a charitable association.

This were indeed some spirit, 'scaped by chance illustrate them. One of them has a con

It is gratifying to have to add, that this From torments in the central earth, and flung spicuous view of the Laigh Kirk, so admira- truly excellent and benevolent Institution Like an eruption from the thundering breast bly described in that celebrated novel : the is prospering exeeedingly.

Of Ætna, or those mighty hills that stand other is a more general view of the city,

Like giants on the Quito plains, to spread with the river, bridge, &c. which are 'also

Contagion thro' the skies. Thus Satan once mentioned in the perambulations of Mr. ORIGINAL POETRY.

Sprang up adventurous from Hell's blazing porch;

And (like & stream of fire) winged' his fierce way Osbaldistone. But they stand in need of

Ambiguous+undismayed thro' frighful wastes, no adseititious recommendation, for they We are tempted by the beauty of our To where; amidst the jarring elements, its idi? we intrinsically possessed of all that 'can Poctical contributions this week, to point Stern Chaos saté, and everlasting Night vild! soumdud applause from the lovers of the particular notice to the following pieces. Held ber dominionyet even there he found!

[graphic]

Pro

1

the reins She sweeps her way, a bark magnificent,

atsid L THE SLOE.

The way to Eden. But away such thoughts, Some he commands to wheek in holy watch: said those whose memoirs we have had to op

1 Lest 1, bewildered

by my phantasy, tum around the globe, some from their plüres to pour: portunity of obtaining, is Dr. Barney; and Dream of dark ills to come, and dare believe, The harvest blooms of gold, some to drop dew when we consider that efforts' are now mak(Shutting my eyes against the gracious light And odours on the surub, and springing foreiging

to dispose of the Kibrary of that emiNow given) that the Eternal Power can sleep Some to tint beauty's check, or limn the clouds i nenit "scholar, we are not sorry to consult While mischief walks the world, i rollen B. With light of gems, and blushes of

L. But in his own high hand he holds 097 out own 'sense of impartiality, ontmoosk n That rule the Ocean. Stil I see him hot, bably the feelings

of his relatives on the ilgiul THE MOON. So deep a veil is tötind his kingly tént, 19. score of delicacy, by copying the annexed in die FRENETICo. have to T Flashing thick brilliance like a web of stars. sketch from an excellent contemporáry pub

alatt It opens. Thou bright sitter on that thronetno lication, the New Monthly Magazine Past thoughts, that come like skuadows from their Before the morn, Tis not the dindem si o A.S. Chaplain to the King, Rector of St.

D R Dissolving as we clasp them, sudden sonnds, Norisceptre, tho it slow, with living lightiebole Professor of Ancient Literature in the Royal

Floating, in diamond fires, upon thy broyo istano Paul's, Deptford, Vicar of Hernhill, Kent, That have no touch of earthly minstrelstruint a Perpetual, pearly flame and lamhent gold 191 1 Academy, and Honorary Librarian to the But seem to fall bathed in the honey dews,

of And soft as star-light-t, Yet within the brain best

1990-92 I mot 21 Otto Royal Institution, was the son of the late Waking strange fantasies, and then they flysHe sits like one erbosound in the

high thought Dr. B. óf 'inusical celebrity. He was born in And leave me feeding on my melancholy. Pittoc This arm outstretch'd, and liand upon the globeto 1758, while his father resided as organist at To torture me. And now its herald windot saat And forkvard, shooting out a calin, long blaze 1:10 tinguished-liitself for his proficiency in Comes gushing chilly thro' my prison bars, divi Blue as the lightnings on the summer ever 1993 classical learning, and as an assistant to I hate thee! yet thou'rt lovely to Earth's slaves. His locks are amber rays, that sparkling fall, To the tired sea-boy nestling in the shroudsParted, around his high, pure brow, and shace;

Dr. Rose, at Chiswick, he perfected himThe soldier loves the weary from his march, IT Clustering, the cheek, where flowers of Paradise self in those studies which in his later years And longing to ungird his harnessry zgi Mix with the splendoors of the westerix Sun.

acquired hin the high reputation lie so long The o'erlabour'd peasant feels thee full of lifeHe stands, and his broad wings Amfold above enjoyed On his marriage with Miss Rose And thy dim clouds stoop down, a, covering. In feathery light, pavilioning his state, and bas the management of the school devolved Of genial slumber on his quiet bed. But to the brain of yisions, to torn hearts Nor fragrance, as they ruffle that sweet air josequent life was passed in the laborions

A silver canopy; not without sound, 20 vizia upon him; and the best portion of his subMouldering, like embers that yet feed their flame, But followed with wild, sudden symphonies duties of a schoolmaster for many years at Mother of spectres, thou’rt a fearful thing. That earthly harps know not ; and odorous breath Harumersmith, ahdii afterwards vat GreenBut light is stealing dimly thro? my cellProCrush'd, wreathựd and weeping, i'th' evening dew.

wich. The weininence to which many of Streak upon streak, like ebon ivory-lined, de!

his pupils "have risen in the pulpit, pat the The Moon has risen. How glorious thro' the nocasnya yło zimne 700 dolma bar, and in the sonate; bears strong testi

clouds
STORT 1 Woul 10 pred 1

6.210 widmony to his unwearied assiduity in this ardu

920' mizo"ous profession. From the peculiar mortib Now the white billow hides her now Free thro' a sapphire depth, anon a ringa

She rouls at the grape tlie bramble and the blbe the vine? ney was not 'exempt, although he toiled for Swells, round her, swiftly tinged with widening 101 fit-tors trubivil this wearisome professionnin'Istime

- 19 otro la 17b Bludkmorett so many years, and with so much suécess in of watery pearl, and the white blowing rose, Blackmore, well thou desery'st thy Dancíad fame, Frorri 'this enervating profession the Doda Az if her prow had plunged, and chafed the blue For

libelling the shrub whose prajse is minér tor in 1812 totally retired, leaving in the Of that celestial ocean into foam.

Hail Slop, which ne'er till now rais d poet's hands of his son, the Rer. Charles Parr Bur-
El flame, i. io

oth 200 ney, la charge which he had himself so long I feel as if strong pinions on my feet

But in his Mistress" jetty eye to shine and and so honourably;exereised. In 1807, Dr. Were lifting me from earth.—I see the Moon

Hail SLOE, I sing thy juice in black-red + wine, Burney entered into Hüly Orders, and his Expanding as I rise." "Tis lovelier now,

Inspiring bards beyond Oporto's grape; Tho' seen but from mid air. Long emerald hues

Thy Jenves I sing, when tea dispels the gare

resided since his retirement from the school, Mingled with purple, and the sapphire light /

Of languor, by its influence divine! Ito at his Rectory-house, at Deptfordrio There, That beams from evening waters, image there

di

enignod in the continued prosecution of literary purBowers of bright beauty, solemn glades, soft hills Britain, disdained so long by foreign tongues, suits, were passed his latter years. Sur Empurpled with the mantle of rich blooms Boast now thy Sloe, with loucl-resounding lungs, lected, he enjoyed in the bosom of his fa

rounded by the noble library he had colThat know no time of fading, crystal lakes Fanned but by musky gales, those sweet buds

Thy peerless plant, which crowns each barren mily those pleasures which a cultivated mind

clift : breathe wider Thou art no pilgrim-bark thro' heavenly seas;

And this of thy landamus be the dift_" can alone appreciate. Tliere too, in the full 17 China shall have no kotou for her teas,

vigour of manhood, with the promise of an But a soft lower Paradise, to soothe 90 The spirits of the innocent, ere they passou

"Europe may drain her wine-press to the lees, extended life, he was summoned suddenly, Before the loftier throne. Here rest, sweet babes shift! Will. TARDUS, mas eve, after reading to his family the ser

We care not--with slod-leaves-and-juice we but not unprepared to eternity. On ChristThat looked hut upon earth, and wept and died, Maids that like may-dew shone, and were ex

mon which he had prepared for the follow* Several manufactories of tea from the leaves of the haled that both wad blackthorn, or stoe, were last week "discovered by the ing day, he retired to bed in perfect health. High hearts that died of unrequited love, role Excise. Im With Next morning, his servant, on entering his As myrtle Wossoms, dropt without a wind; + Rich fragrant wines the cheering bowl supply,--Popel chamber, discovered that while dressing Disastrous patriots, fallen before they won 30 The Muse's friend, Tea, does our fancy aid, Toit himself, he had been seized with an apo The desperate field-their laurels pluck'd, not Repress those yapours which the head inxade. pleetie fit, and was extended on the floori

wreath'd ;ud ni nomi att bb ford of min Waller He lingered almost speechless till his dissoBards, that with nature's touch awoke the harp,

te lution on the Sunday following it on Yet won not the world's car, till on their graves That sweet harp echodd, drawing useless tears.

BIOGRAPIIY. For The world, by common consent, has long

aeknowledged him the first classical scholar I've reach'd thoe now. Thou art no Paradise,

REV. DR. BURNEY:

of the age. When Porson died, ther palin Where injured Spirits brighten for high Heaven,

became undisputed; and, though we have Thou art a lonely throne; thy canopyanis

CIRCUMSTANCES sometimes occur to pre- still left amongst us men, whom days of unVeils the resplendent Angel of our world. do 1 rent us from fulfilling that part of our de divided toil, and nights of undiminished A thousand seraphs in their circles wait!) sign which comprehends the original bio study, have rendered aceomplishedhiudi pron On Him, the Servant of a mightier One.graphy of distinguislied persons. Among found, even by these the name of Burnoy

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