Exile and Journey in Seventeenth-Century Literature

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Cambridge University Press, 5 abr 2007
The political and religious upheavals of the seventeenth century caused an unprecedented number of people to emigrate, voluntarily or not, from England. Among these exiles were some of the most important authors in the Anglo-American canon. In this 2007 book, Christopher D'Addario explores how early modern authors thought and wrote about the experience of exile in relation both to their lost homeland and to the new communities they created for themselves abroad. He analyses the writings of first-generation New England Puritans, the Royalists in France during the English Civil War, and the 'interior exiles' of John Milton and John Dryden. D'Addario explores the nature of artistic creation from the religious and political margins of early modern England, and in doing so, provides detailed insight into the psychological and material pressures of displacement and a much overdue study of the importance of exile to the development of early modern literature.

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Nostalgia and nationalism in
22
Exile and the semantic education of
57
makes similar rhetorical moves closing down the meaning of particular
84
Dryden
124

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Página 119 - This is dispensed ; and what surmounts the reach Of human sense I shall delineate so, By likening spiritual to corporal forms, As may express them best ; though what if earth Be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein Each to other like, more than on earth is thought...
Página 109 - Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of chaos: or if Sion hill...
Página 39 - We will not say, as the Separatists were wont to say at their leaving of England, Farewell, Babylon! farewell, Rome! but we will say, Farewell, dear England, farewell, the church of God in England and all the Christian friends there.
Página 102 - In courts and palaces he also reigns, And in luxurious cities, where the noise Of riot ascends above their loftiest towers, And injury, and outrage: And when night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.
Página 87 - But I trust I shall have spoken Perswasion to abundance of sensible and ingenuous Men ; to som perhaps whom God may raise of these Stones to become Children of reviving Liberty ; and may reclaim, though they seem now chusing them a Captain back for Egypt...
Página 113 - Not what they would ? what praise could they receive ? What pleasure I from such obedience paid ? When will and reason, reason also is choice, Useless and vain, of freedom both despoil'd, Made passive both, had served necessity, Not me? They therefore, as to right belong'd, So were created, nor can justly...
Página 137 - Virgil's sense. What I have said, though it has the face of arrogance, yet is intended for the honour of my country; and therefore I will boldly own that this English translation has more of Virgil's spirit in it than either the French or the Italian.

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