Letters to and from the Late Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: To which are Added Some Poems Never Before Printed, Volumen 2

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A. Strahan, 1788 - 424 páginas
 

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Página 191 - You willing in a short time to alleviate your trouble by some other exercise of the mind. I am not without my part of the calamity. No death since that of my Wife has ever oppressed me like this. But let us remember that we are in the hands of him who knows when to give, and when to take away, who will look upon us with mercy through all our variations of existence, and who invites us to call on him in the day of trouble. Call upon him in this great revolution of life, and call with confidence. You...
Página 153 - This was a good rabble trick. The debtors and the criminals were all set at liberty ; but of the criminals, as has always happened, many are already retaken ; and two pirates have surrendered themselves, and it is expected that they will be pardoned.
Página 377 - ... attempting to dissuade her, attended on her journey ; and when they came to the irremeable stream that separated the two kingdoms, walked by her side into the water, in the middle of which he seized her bridle, and with earnestness proportioned to her danger and his own affection pressed her to return. The Queen went forward. If the parallel reaches thus far, may it go no farther. — The tears stand in my eyes.
Página 269 - I think, slept. When I saw light, it was time to contrive what I should do. Though God stopped my speech he left me my hand, I enjoyed a mercy which was not granted to my dear friend Lawrence, who now perhaps overlooks me as I am writing, and rejoices that I have what he wanted.
Página 144 - Sessions-house at the Old Bailey. There were not, I believe, a hundred; but they did their work at leisure, in full security, without sentinels, without trepidation, as men lawfully employed in full day.
Página 144 - Newgate to demand their companions who had been seized demolishing the chapel. The keeper could not release them but by the Mayor's permission, which he went to ask; at his return he found all the prisoners released, and Newgate in a blaze. They then went to Bloomsbury, and...
Página 145 - The King said in council, that the magistrates had not done their duty, but that he would do his own; and a proclamation was published, directing us to keep our servants within doors, as the peace was now to be preserved by force. The soldiers were sent out to different parts, and the town is now at quiet.
Página 100 - Now you think yourself the first writer in the world for a letter about nothing. Can you write such a letter as this? So miscellaneous, with such noble disdain of regularity, like Shakespeare's works; such graceful negligence of transition, like the ancient enthusiasts? The pure voice of nature and of friendship.
Página 15 - ... undisguised in its natural process; nothing is inverted, nothing distorted; you see systems in their elements; you discover actions in their motives. Of this great truth, sounded by the knowing to the ignorant, and so echoed by the ignorant to the knowing, what evidence have you now before you! Is not my soul laid open in these veracious pages? Do not you see me reduced to my first principles?
Página 269 - I was alarmed, and prayed God, that however he might afflict my body, he would spare my understanding. This prayer, that I might try the integrity of my faculties, I made in Latin verse. The lines were not very good, but I knew them not to be very good: I made them easily, and concluded myself to be unimpaired in my faculties.

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