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The discourses in this volume are wholly practical. They were intended to be such as would be adapted to impress on the mind the importance and necessity of personal religion, and to urge the necessity of a holy life, as the first great duty of man. There are no sermons in the volume which professedly discuss the doctrines of Christianity; and no sentiments are intended to be advanced which would offend evangelical Christians of any denomination. The appeals, illustrations, and arguments to a holy life, are based on the supposition of the truth of the evangelical doctrines; but it was no part of the plan to discuss those doctrines, or to make them prominent. I may be permitted, perhaps, to say, in justice to myself, that, my usual manner of preaching to my own congregation is much more doctrinal in its character than the perusal of these sermons might lead a reader to suppose. These are intentionally sekcted for their practical character.

ALBERT BARNES.

CONTENTS.

Job xxii. 21. Acquaint now thyself with him, and be at peace.

SERMON IX. Repentance .....

132

Acts xvii. 30. And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now

commandeth all men every where to repent.

SERMON X. Salvation Easy......

•148

Matt. xi. 30. My yoke is easy, and my burden is light

SERMON XI. The Principles on which a Profession of

Religion should be made. No. 1........164

2 Cor. vi. 17, 18. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye sepa-

rate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive
you, and will be a father into you, and ye shall be my sons and daugh-
ters, saith the Lord Almighty.

Page

SERMON XII. The Principles on which a Profession of

Religion should be made. No. 2 ........181

2 Cor. vi. 17, 18. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye sepa-

rate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive

you, and will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daugh-

ters, saith the Lord Almighty.

SERMON XIII. Enemies of the Cross of Christ. No. 1..193

Phil, iii. 18. For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell

you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ.

SERMON XIV. Enemies of the Cross of Christ. No. 2..208

Phil. iii. 18. For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now tell

you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ.

Sermon XV. Enemies of the Cross of Christ. No. 3....221

Phil. iii. 18, 19. For many walk, of whom I have told you often, and now

tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ,

whose end is destruction.

SERMON XVI. The Rule of Christianity, in regard to

Conformity to the World.

.234

Rom. xii. 2. And be not conformed to this world.

Sermon XVII. The Blessings of a Benignant Spirit...252

Col. iii. 12. Put on, therefore, as the elect of God-kindness.

SERMON XVIII. Secret Prayer

...266

Matt. vi. 6. Biit thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when

thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy

Father, which seeth in secret, shall reward thee openly.

SERMON XIX. The Sabbath...

........281

Ex. xx. 8. Remember the Sabbath-day, keep it holy.

SERMON XX. Secret Faults

......296

Psalm xix. 12. Who can understand his errors ? Cleanse thou me from

secret faults.

Sermon XXI. Preparation to meet God.... ........311

Amos iv, 12. Prepare to meet thy God.

SERMON XXII. The Burden of Dumah

.325

Isa. xxi. 11, 12. The burden of Dumah. He calleth to me ont of Seir,

Watchman, what of the night? Watchman, what of the night? The

watchman said, The morning cometh, and also the night.-If ye will en-

quire, enquire ye. Return, come.

SERMON XXIII. The Harvest Past..

- 342

Jer. viii. 20. The harvest is past, the summer is ended, and we are not

saved.

PRACTICAL SERMONS.

SERMON I.

THE FREENESS OF THE GOSPEL.

Rev. xxii. 17. And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst, Come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.

The obvious sentiment of this beautiful passage of Scripture is, that the offers of salvation are made freely to all men, and that the invitation is to be pressed on the attention by all the means which can be employed. To this sentiment, I propose at this time to invite your attention.

The figure of “the water of life” which John employs in the text, is one that often occurs in the Scriptures to represent the mercy of God towards mankind. Thus Isaiah (xxxv. 6) in speaking of the times of the Messiah says, 6 Then shall the lame man leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb sing: for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert. And the parched ground shall become a pool, and the thirsty land springs of water.” And again (xli. 18), “I will open rivers in high places, and fountains in the midst of the vallies: I will make the wilderness a pool of water, and the dry land springs of water.” And again (lv. 1), “Ho, every one that thirsteth,

he waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money, and without price.” The idea in all these passages is, that the blessings of the gospel would resemble fountains and running streams; as if in the solitary, sandy desert, streams of water, pure, refreshing, and ample, should suddenly break forth, and should fill the desolate plains with verdure, and should gladden

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the heart of the fainting traveller,—streams of which each coming caravan might partake without money and without charge. In a world which in regard to its real comforts is not unaptly compared to a waste of pathless sands, the blessings of the gospel would burst forth like cooling, perennial fountains; and man like a weary and thirsty pilgrim might partake and be happy,-as the traveller sits down by such a fountain and slakes his thirst in the desert.

In the text, however, the particular idea is, that men are freely invited to partake of the blessings of salvation. They are invited by the Holy Spirit, and by the bridethe church-to come. So free is salvation that even he who hears of it may go and say to kindred and friend,

come. They who thirst may come :- they who are pressed down by the consciousness of the want of something like this to make them happy, who are satisfiud that happiness can nowhere else be found, who thirst for salvation under the consciousness of sin, and the feeling that the “world can never give the bliss for which they sigh,” are invited to come; and all who choose may come and partake freely of the waters of life.—John saw in vision (ch. xxii. 1) “a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and the Lamb.” To that pure and clear river of salvation, men are invited to come freely. There they may slake their thirst. There the desires of the immortal mind, where all earthly things fail, may be satisfied.

It is not my purpose in this discourse—though my text might seem to invite to it-to dwell on the fact that the gospel is offered to all men; that the Redeemer died for all; that the Eternal Father is willing to save all ; or that ample provision is made for all who will come. On these points, it is sufficient for my present purpose to say, that my text declares that, “whosoever will may take the water of life freely ;" that God has elsewhere said, “Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters;" that the Redeemer has said, “come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” It is enough that God has solemnly sworn,

as I live I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked,

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