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Lesson.

Page.

79. Claims of the Jews ....

....Noel. 145

80. Happiness of Devotional Habits and Feelings. Wellbeloved. 147

86. Folly of deferring Religious Duties..

.Ibid. 156

87. Religion the best Preparation for Duty in Life.... ..NORTON. 158

88. The Young of every Rank entitled to Education...GREENWOOD. 160

93. The Bells of St. Mary's, Limerick ....London Literary Gazette. 168.

94. Jerusalem and the surrounding Country

Letters from the East, Banks. 171

95. The same, concluded

Ibid. 176

98. Mount Sinai

.... Ibid. 180

100. Religious Education necessary.

GREENWOOD. 185

101. Importance of Science to a Mechanic.. ......G. B. EMERSON. 188

102. Story of Rabbi Akiba... . From Hurwitz's Hebrew Tales. 190

107, First Settlement of the Pilgrims in New England, abridged

and compiled from.

Robertson and Neal. 196

108. Extract from an Oration delivered at Plymouth. E. EVERETT. 200

109. Extract from the same..

..IBID. 201

110. Claim of the Pilgrims to the Gratitude and Reverence of

their Descendants

.0. DEWEY. 205

114. Character of the Puritan Fathers..

GREENWOOD. 213

115. The same, concluded....

.... IBID. 216

116. Extract from a Speech on the American Colonies..Lord Chatham. 219

117. Extract from a Speech on British Aggressions. .PATRICK Henry. 221

118. Account of the Battles of Lexington and Concord .Botta. 223

119. The same,

concluded ..

. . Ibid. 227

120. Extract from an Oration delivered at Concord. .E. EVERETT. 229

127. Account of the Battle of Bunker's Hill.

..Botta. 242

123. The same, concluded.

Ibid. 246

130. Extract from an Address on Bunker's Hill. .D. WEBSTER. 250

131. Extract from the same..

Ibid. 252

134. Extract from a Speech on Dinas Island

. Phillips. 257

135. Nature of True Eloquence. Extract from a Discourse in

commemoration of Adams and Jefferson

.D. WEBSTER. 260

136. Extract from the same Discourse

.. IBID. 261

137 Extract from the same..

... IBID. 263

LESSONS IN POETRY.

Lesson.

Page.

41, The Country Clergyman

Goldsmith. 84

42. Parody on “ The Country Clergyman". .Blackwood's Ed. Mag. 86

43. Elegy on Mrs. Mary Blaize

Goldsmith. 88

44. The Sick Man and the Angel,

Gay. 89

48. Niagara Falls,--from the Spanish ...U. S. Literary GAZETTE. 96

53. The Blind Boy.

.Bloomfield. 106

54. A Thought on Death

Mrs. Barbauld. 107

55. The Old Man's Funeral

.. BRYANT. 107

56. Sunday Evening....

. Bowring. 109

57. The Star of Bethlehem

.J. G. PERCIVAL. 110

60. The silent Expression of Nature.

Anonymous, 117

61. A Thought

.Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. 118

62. Fidelity.

Wordsworth. 119

63. Solitude.

Henry K. White. 121

66. The Man of Ross

.Pope. 125

68. On visiting a Scene of Childhood ...Blackwood's Ed. Magazine. 129

69. The little Graves

. Anonymous. 131

70. Life and Death ....

- New Monthly Magazine. 133

71. The Burial of Arnold.

WILLIS. 134

74. Address to Liberty

.Cowper. 138

75. The Hermit

.Beattie. 139

76. Hymn the Stars

Monthly Repository. 141

81. The Seasons

. Mrs. Barbauld. 149

82. March.

BRYANT. 151

83. April..

..LONGFELLOW. 152

84. May

.J. G. PERCIVAL. 153

85. The Voice of Spring

..Mrs. Hemans. 153

89. Childhood and Manhood. An Apologue.

..Crabbe. 162

90. The Skies.....

.BRYANT. 164

91. Address to the Stars..

New Monthly Magazine. 165

92. Song of the Stars...

.BRYANT. 166

96." That ye, through his poverty, might be rich” W. Russell. 178

97. Elijah fed by Ravens

Grahame. 179

99. The Summit of Mount Sinai

..Montgomery. 184

103. Alice Fell

Wordsworth. 191

104. The Æolian Harp..

. European Magazine. 193

105. Burial of Sir John Moore...

Anonymous. 194

106. War unnatural and unchristian.

.MELLEN. 195

111. Song of the Pilgrims...

T. C. UPHAM. 210

112, Landing of the Pilgrims

Mrs. Hemans. 211

113. The Pilgrim Fathers

.PIERPONT. 212

121. Elegy, in a Country Churchyard.

Gray. 231

122. The Grave of Körner.

Mrs. Hemans. 235

123. God's First Temples. A Hymn

.BRYANT. 236

124. Hymn of Nature

PEABODY. 239

125. Lines on revisiting the Country

BRYANT. 241

126. Lines on a Peehive.

Monthly Repository. 242

129. Warren's Address before the Battle of Bunker's Hill..PIERPONT. 250

132. Hymn, commemorative of the Battle of Bunker's Hill........ID. 254

133. “ What's hallowed Ground ?".

. Campbell. 255

138. The School Boy....

Amulet. 266

139. Stanzas addressed to the Greeks.

· Anonymous. 267

140. Spanish Patriot's Song..

Anon. 268

141. The Three Warnings .

. Mrs. Thrale. 269

142. The Mariner's Dream

Dimond. 272

143. Absalom

WILLIS, 274

INDEX OF AUTHORS.

. 29, 45.

33.

.54, 81.

..26.

..75.

..6, 78.

Mavor ...

.....106.

The names of American authors are in Italic.
Lessons.

Legsong.
Addison.

.6,8, 34. Jefferson, Thomas . . 16, 52.
Alison

Johnson, Dr. Samuel. 30,
Amulet

138.
Knox, Vicesimus

.64.
Anonymous....10, 31, 32, 35, 49, 60,
69, 105, 139, 140.

Longfellow, H. W..

..83.
Banks
.94, 95, 98. Mackenzie

..23, 58.
Barbauld, Mrs. L.

Magazine, New Monthly..67, 70, 91.
Barton, Bernard

Blackwood's Edin... 24,
Beattie

42, 51, 61, 68.
Berquin.

..4.
European

104.
Bible..

Malte-Brun

.50.
Bloomfield
..53.

.72.
Botta.
.118, 119, 127, 128.
May

.2.
Bowring.

..27, 56.

Mellen..
Bryant. . 19, 55, 82, 90, 92, 123, 125. Milonov, translated by Bowring.,27.

Missourian

.13.
Campbell

.133.
Channing, W. E...

.77.
Montgomery

.99.
Moodie

11, 28.
Chatham, Lord,-W. Pitt 116.
Chesterfield

.5. Neal and Robertson (abridged). .107.
Chronicle, London Literary .40. Noel

.79.
Cowper
.74. Norton, A..

..87.
Crabbe

.89.
Peabody, W. 0. B.

.124.
Dewey, Orville.
110. Percival, J. G.

.57, 84.
Dimond

Phillips

.134.
Edwards, Charles.

.37.

Pierpont, J. . 113, 129, 132.
Pope .

...66.
Emerson, G. B...

. 101.
Emporium, (Trenton)

..14.
Rabbinical Tales

.7, 102.
Everett, Edward ....108, 109, 120. Repository, Monthly .76, 126.
Flint, T..

.20.

Republican, Nat. (Cincinnati)..15.
.21.

Review, London Quarterly ..46.
Fuller ....

...1.
3.
Robertson, (abridged)

and Neal (abridged). 107.
Gay
.44. Russell, William

.96.
Gazette, London Literary ......93.
United States Literary ..48.

Sprague, Charles ..
Goldsmith.

Statesman, New York......17, 18.

..41, 43, 65, 73.
Grahame
..97. Taylor, Miss Jane...

.59.
Gray
.121. Thrale, Mrs..

.141.
Greenwood, F. W. P..88, 100, 114,

Upham T. Ç.......

.111,
115.
Hawkesworth....

12.
Ware, H. Jr.

..9.
Hemans, Mrs. F...36, 85, 112, 122.

Webster, D..130, 131, 135, 136, 137.
Wellbeloved

.80, 86.
Henry, Patrick

..117.
Howison.

White, Henry K.

.25, 63.
Willis ...

.71, 143,
Irving, Washington

.......38, 39.
Wordsworth

.62, 103.

.142.

M...

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..47.

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NATIONAL READER.

LESSON I.

Discovery of America.--Abridged from ROBERTSON.

On Friday, the third day of August, in the year one thousand four hundred and ninety-two, Columbus set sail from Palos, in Spain, a little before sunrise, in presence of a vast crowd of spectators, who sent up their supplications to heaven for the prosperous issue of the voyage ; which they wished, rather than expected.

His squadron, if it merit that name, consisted of no more than three small vessels,—the Santa Maria, the Pinta, and the Nigna, -having on board ninety men, mostly sailors, together with a few adventurers, who followed the fortune of Columbus, and some gentlemen of the Spanish court, whom the queen appointed to accompany him.

He steered directly for the Cănāry Islands; from which, after refitting his ships, and supplying himself with fresh provisions, he took his departure on the sixth day of September. Here the voyage of discovery may properly be said to have begun; for Columbus, holding his course due west, left immediately the usual track of navigation, and stretched into unfrequent'ed and unknown seas.

The first day, as it was very calm, he made but little way; but, on the second, he lost sight of the Canaries; and many of the sailors, already dejected and dismayed, when they contemplated the boldness of the undertaking, began to beat their breasts, and to shed tears, as if they were never more to behold land. Columbus comforted them with assurances of success, and the prospect of vast wealth in those opulent regions, whither he was conducting them.

This early discovery of the spirit of his followers taught Columbus that he must prepare to struggle, not only with the

mense.

unavoidable difficulties which might be expected from the nature of his undertaking, but with such as were likely to arise from the ignorance and timidity of the people under his command; and he perceived, that the art of governing the minds of men would be no less requisite for accomplishing the discoveries, which he had in view, than naval skill and an enterprising courage.

Happily for himself, and for the country by which he was employed, he joined to the ardent temper and inventive genius of a projector, virtues of another species, which are rarely united with them. He possessed a thorough knowledge of mankind, an insinuating address, a patient perseverance in executing any plan, the perfect governinent of his own passions, and the talent of acquiring the direction of those of other men.

All these qualities, which formed him for command, were accompanied with that superior knowledge of his profession which begets confiderre, in times of difficulty and danger. To unskilful Spanish sailors, accustomed only to coasting yoyages in the Mediterranean, the maritime science of Columbus, the fruit of thirty years' experience, appeared im

As soon as they put to sea, he regulated every thing by his sole authority; he superintended the execution of every order, and, allowing himself only a few hours for sleep, he was, at all other times, upon deck.

As his course lay through seas which had not been visited before, the sounding line, or instruments for observation, were continually in his hands. He attended to the motion of the tides and currents, watched the flight of birds, the appearance of fishes, of sea-weeds, and of every thing that floated on the waves, and accurately noted every occurrence in a journal that he kept.

By the fourteenth day of September, the fleet was above two hundred leagues to the west of the Canary Isles, a greater distance from land than any Spaniard had ever been before that time. Here the sailors were struck with an appearance no less astonishing than new. They observed that the magnetic needle, in their compasses, did not point exactly to the north star, but varied towards the west.

This appearance, which is now familiar, filled the companions of Columbus with terror. They were in an ocean boundless and unknown, nature itself seemed to be altered, and the only guide, which they had left, was about to fail them. Columbus, with no less quickness than ingenuity, invented

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