Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Human Evolution

Portada
Bernard Wood
John Wiley & Sons, 31 mar. 2011 - 1264 páginas
2 Reseñas
This comprehensive A to Z encyclopedia provides extensive coverageof important scientific terms related to improving ourunderstanding of how we evolved. Specifically, the 5,000 entries inthis two-volume set cover evidence and methods used to investigatethe relationships among the living great apes, evidence about whatmakes the behavior of modern humans distinctive, and evidence aboutthe evolutionary history of that distinctiveness, as well asinformation about modern methods used to trace the recentevolutionary history of modern human populations. This textprovides a resource for everyone studying the emergence of Homosapiens.

Visit the companion site ahref="http://www.woodhumanevolution.com"target="_blank"www.woodhumanevolution.com/a to browseadditional references and updates from this comprehensiveencyclopedia.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

26 microstrain
mudstone
27
102
orthoquartzite
103
phonolite
pumice 31 pumice clast 32 pyroclastic

4 body size
5 bone strength
6 brachial index
limestone
7 center of mass
198 protocone basin 199 protoconid 200 protoconule 201 protofossa
202 protostyle 203 protostylid
8 crural index
9 Curve of Spee
204 pulp 205 pulp chamber
10 COM 1 1 dexterity
143 heritable
144 heritability
145 heterochromatin
146 heteroplasmy 147 heterosis 148 heterozygote 149 heterozyous advantage 150 heterozygous 151 heterozygous advantage 152 heterozygosity
153 homeobox genes 154 homeodomain 155 homologous
156 homozygote 157 homozygous
158 housekeeping gene
159 HOX genes
160 human accelerated regions 161 Human Genome Project
12 humerofemoral index 13 intermembral index
14 economy
162 human leucocyte antigens 163 hybrid 164 hybridization 165 hybrid zone
166 hypervariable region
167 IBD 168 I88 169 ID 170 identical by descent 171 identical by state
172 immunochemistry 173 immunoglobulins 174 immunological distance 175 imprinting
176 indel
15 efficiency
16 elastic modulus
17 failure 18 force
19 force plate 20 ground reaction force 21 isotropy 22 kinematics 23 kinetics 24 knucklewalking
206 relative tooth size 207 ridge
35 Lainyamok
80
208 root
37 Lomekwi
25 locomotion
metaquartzite
quartzite
105
36 rhyolite
106
sandstone
sanidine 40 sapropel
107
108
41
109
209 shovelshaped incisors
110
111
112
114
stromatolite
210 talon 211 talonid 212 talonid basin
GJQQQQQQQOJOJOJOJOJOJOJOJ
213 teleconid
tephra
214 Tomes root
215 tooth material 216 tooth size
217 tooth wear
trachyte
218 transverse crest 219 transverse ridge
travertine
220 tribosphenic 221 trigon 222 trigon basin 223 trigon crest 224 trigonid 225 trigonid basin
226 trigonid crest
227 tubercle 228 tuberculum
229 tuberculum anomalus 230 tuberculum intermedium 231 tuberculum paramolare 232 tuberculum sextum
vitric tuff
49 welded tuff
Loruth Kaado
Ill Dating A Terms 1 23 ka world 2 41 ka world 3 100 ka world 4
Lothagam
5 AARD 6 absolute dating 7 accelerator mass spectrometer
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Sobre el autor (2011)

Bernard Wood is the University Professor of Human Origins in the Department of Anthropology at George Washington University, and Adjunct Senior Scientist at the National Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution. He is a medically-qualified paleoanthropologist who moved into full-time academic life in 1972. He holds the degrees of B.Sc., M.D., Ph.D., and D.Sc. from The University of London. In 1982 he was appointed to the S.A. Courtauld Chair of Anatomy in The University of London, and in 1985 he moved to the Derby Chair of Anatomy and to the Chairmanship of the Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Liverpool. He was appointed the Dean of The University of Liverpool Medical School in 1995 and served as Dean until his move to Washington in the fall of 1997.When he was still a medical student he joined Richard Leakey's first expedition to what was then Lake Rudolf in 1968 and he has remained associated with that research group, and pursued research in paleoanthropology, ever since. His research centers on increasing our understanding of human evolutionary history by developing and improving the ways we analyze the hominid fossil record. He is the author of numerous publications and Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology at GWU.

Información bibliográfica