The North British Review, Volúmenes 26-27

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W. P. Kennedy, 1857
 

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Página 239 - And, as I mused it in his antique tongue, I saw, in gradual vision through my tears, The sweet, sad years, the melancholy years, Those of my own life, who by turns had flung A shadow across me. Straightway I was 'ware, So weeping, how a mystic Shape did move Behind me, and drew me backward by the hair: And a voice said in mastery, while I strove, — 'Guess now who holds thee?' — 'Death,' I said. But, there, The silver answer rang, — 'Not Death, but Love.
Página 19 - My God, the spring of all my joys, The life of my delights, The glory of my brightest days, And comfort of my nights.
Página 20 - Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast, Save in the death of Christ, my God : All the vain things that charm me most, I sacrifice them to his blood.
Página 19 - See the wretch, that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again : The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.
Página 175 - For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Página 104 - Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us : thou that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us...
Página 135 - Because half a dozen grasshoppers under a fern make the field ring with their importunate chink, whilst thousands of great cattle, reposed beneath the shadow of the British oak, chew the cud and are silent, pray do not imagine that those who make the noise are the only inhabitants of the field ; that of course, they are many in number; or that, after all, they are other than the little, shrivelled, meagre, hopping, though loud and troublesome, insects of the hour.
Página 11 - Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes ; and adversity is not without comforts and hopes. We see, in needleworks and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome ground : judge, therefore, of the pleasure of the heart bv the pleasure of the eye.
Página 20 - My faith would lay her hand On that dear head of thine, While like a penitent I stand And there confess my sin.
Página 10 - Young men are fitter to invent, than to judge; fitter for execution than for counsel; and fitter for new projects than for settled business...

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