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General Instructions to Sir John Moore, before he set out on his March

to Spain.Plan of Leading a British Army into the Heart of Spain

-By whom formed. The British Ministry deplorably ignorant both of

the French Force in Spain, and the real State of that Country. The

French concentrated behind the Ebro.-The whole of their Force in

Cantonments and GarrisonsExaggerated Accounts of the Enthusiasm

of the Spaniards.--Fond Credulity of the British Ministry on that Sub-

ject, and, in Consequence of this, the most romantic projects. The flatter-

ing Expectations of Co-operation held out to Sir John Moore utterly dis?

appointed. - Central Junta of Spain. - Their Character, incredible

Weakness and FollyTraitors among them.-False Intelligence of

the Approach of the French in great Force to Salamanca.-Measures

announced by Sir John Moore under the Impression of this to the Junta

of that place.- Amazing Apathy and Indifference to Public Affairs

and the Fate of the Country.Tardy and deficient Supplies to our

Army.The Situation of Sir David Baird, who had landed in Gal.

licia, materially affected by the Defeat of the Spanish army of the North.

-Design of Sir John Moore to take a Line of Positions on the

Duero-Frustrated by the total Defeat of General Castanos By this

the British General determined to retreat on Lisbon This Plan of

Retreating abandoned, and why-False and treacherous Intelligence

transmitted by the Civil and Military Junta of Madrid to the Com-

mander of the British Army-Warmly seconded and supported by

Dispatches from Mr. Frêre--Strange Infatuation, as well as Arro-

gance and Presumption, of that Minister-Means by which the false

Intelligence was happily counteracted. The Force brought against

Spain by Buonaparte after the Conference of Erfurth. The bold

Measures adopted by the British Commander for the Extrication

of

and pursuing other partial objects have no alternative but to increase
which do not for a moment arrest our own empire, or become a part
the progress of the enemy, nor of that of France."
increase our owo strength, is wast. If we could yield to our inclina.
ing our time and resouroes in a fe. tion, we would present to our read.
verish attempt to put off the day ers the whole of this little treatise,
of our destruction a little longer. without dread of being called to
Voless we become ambitious like account by Mr. Leckie, whose
our enemy, unless we follow the views appear to be merely patrio.
maxims we have so much enlarged tic, for invading his literary pro-
upon, we must finally submit. We perty.

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General Instructions to Sir John Moore, before he set out on his March

to Spain.-Plan of Leading a British Army into the Heart of Spain

-By whom formed.- The British Ministry

deplorably ignorant both of

the French Force in Spain, and the real State of that Country.- - The

French concentrated behind the Ebro. The whole of their Force in

Cantonments and GarrisonsExaggerated Accounts of the Enthusiasm

of the Spaniards.--Fond Credulity of the British Ministry on that Sub-

ject, and, in Consequence of this, the most romantic projects. The

flatter-

ing Expectations of Co-operation held out to Sir John Moore utterly disa

appointed.-- Central Junta of Spain. - Their Character, incredible

Weakness and FollyTraitors among them.-False Intelligence of

the Approach of the French in great Force to Salamanca.-Measures

announced by Sir John Moore under the Impression of this to the Junta

of that place.- Amazing Apathy and Indifference to Public Affairs

and the Fate of the Country.--Tardy and deficient Supplies to our

Army.--The Situation of Sir David Baird, who had landed in Gal.

licia,

materially affected by the Defeat of the Spanish army of the North.

--Design of Sir John Moore to take a Line of Positions on the

Duero-Frustrated by the total Defeat of General Castanos-By this

the British General determined to retreat on Lisbon-- This Plan of

Retreating abandoned, and why— False and treacherous Intelligence

transmitted by the Civil and Military Junta of Madrid to the Com-

mander of the British Army-Warmly seconded and supported by

Dispatches from Mr. Frêre-Strange Infatuation, as well as Arro-

gance and Presumption, of that Minister-Means by which the false

Intelligence was happily counteracted.--The Force brought against

Spain by Buonaparte after the Conference of Erfurth. The bold

Measures adopted by the British Commander for the Extrication

of

of his Army, draw the whole of the French Forces from their Marek
to Southern to ihe Northern Provinces.-The_British Army
commences its Retreat-Closely pursued by 70,000 French.-General
Orders by Sir John Moore, reflecting on the Conduct of both Officers
and Soldiers.-Difficulties overcome, and dreadful hardships, prira-
tions, and Losses sustained during the retreat to Corunna-Which is
at last effectedBattle of Corunna.--Death and Character of Sir
John Moore-Embarkation of the British Troops for England ....)

CHAP. II.

Meeting of the Imperial British Parliament-Speech from the Throne -

Address in Answer, moved in the House of Lords by the Earl of
Bridgewater, and seconded by Lord Shelfield-Opposed by the Earl
of St. Vincent - Some parts of the Address approved and some disap-
proved by different speakers.--Animadversions on the Address, particu-
larly in as far as it related to the Affairs of Spain and Portugal, by
the Earl of Grosvenor, Lord Grenville, the Earl of Moira, and the
Earl of Buckinghamshire.--

The Address defended by the Earl of Li-
verpool-Agreed to in the House of Commons.-- An Address moved by
the Ilon. Mr. F. Rohinson, and seconded by Mr. F. B. Lushington

Animadversions on the Address, particularly to what related to Spain,
by Mr. Ponsonby- The Address defended in all its parts by Lord Cas-
tlereagħ-- Agreed to

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Motion in the House of Lords for the Thanks of the House to Lieule-

nant-General Sir A. Wellesley. Why was not the Commander-iz-chief
Sir H. Burrard comprehended in this

Motion ?---Different Opinions on
this Question.— The Motion for Thanks to Sir A. Wellesley agreed to.
- The same subject brought into the House of Commons And the same
Question respecting Sir H. Burrard agitated. The Motion for Thanks
to Sir A. Wellesley opposed by Lord Folkstone.-- Testimonies in favour
of Sir A. Wellesley-of Major-general Ferguson Arad Brigadier
general Anstruther. The Molion for Thanks to Sir A. Wellesley
agreed to. Thanks also voted to the other Officers--- Alte solution of
the House, in Approbation of the Conduct of the Non-cammissioned
Officers and Privateso-Motion in the House of Comments for the
Thanks of the Ilouse for the Defeat before Corunaa. Question patta
Ministers, uhy so heavy a Loss as that of Sir J. Montes de had been
sustained, without the Altainment of any onc Object?

CHAP .

CHAP. IV.

Campaign in Portugal - Motion in the House of Commons, by Lord

H. Petty, for a Resolution of the House, declaring that the Con-
vention of Cintra, and a Maritime Convention concluded nearly at
the same Time off the Tagus, had disappointed the Hopes and
Expectations of the Country -- And for a Second, declaring that in
the Opinion of the House of Commons, those Conventions had, in a
great measure, arisen from the Misconduct and Neglect of His

Majesty's Ministers.--Opposed, and the Conduct of Ministry explained

and defended by Lord Castlereagh.-Lord Petty's Motions supported

by General Tarleton.-Views and Motives of Sir Arthur Wellesley

throughout the Expedition to Portugal explained by himself-Speech

of Mr. Windham in Reply to Lord Castlereagh.- Lord Petty's

Motions negatived. Campaign in. SpainInquiry into moved in the

House of Commons by Mr. Ponsonby.-Mr. Ponsonby's Motion

supported by Mr. Windham-Opposed by Lord Castlereagh, Mr.

Canning, and other Speakers-Negatived

54

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CHAP: V.

The Proceedings and Debates in Parliament, either retrospective or pros-
pective--The prospective arranged into general Heads.- The House
of Commons in a Committee of Ways of Means.-- The Budget --The
Irish Budget.-Proceedings of the House of Commons on the Fourth
Report of the Committee of Public Expenditure : which related to the
Misconduct of the Commissioners appointed for the Disposal of Dutch
Captured Property.--Resolutions on the Subject of Finance moved by
Mr. Vansittart--Agreed to.- Abuses brought to Light by the Tenth
Report of the Commissioners of Naval Revision --Resolutions mazed

-

Reports of the Commissioners of Military Inquiry - Enormous Abuses

and Freuds

S6

CHAP. VI.

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