The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for the Year ...

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J. Dodsley, 1792
 

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Página 430 - The misery of gaols is not half their evil : they are filled with every corruption which poverty and wickedness can generate between them ; with all the shameless and profligate enormities that can be produced by the impudence of ignominy, the rage of want, and the malignity of despair.
Página 483 - ... some principles in his nature which interest him in the fortune of others and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others when we either see it or are made to conceive it in a very lively manner.
Página 486 - We sympathize even with the dead, and overlooking what is of real importance in their situation, that awful futurity which awaits them, we are chiefly affected by those circumstances which strike our senses, but can have no influence upon their happiness.
Página 246 - I begged the general officers to consult together for the public utility. They are all of opinion that, as more ships and provisions are now got above the town, they should try, by conveying up a corps of four or five thousand men, which is nearly the whole strength of the Army, after the Points of Levi and Orleans are left in a proper state of defence, to draw the enemy from their present situation, and bring them to an action. I have acquiesced in their proposal, and we are preparing to put it...
Página 246 - In this situation, there is such a choice of difficulties that I own myself at a loss how to determine. The affairs of Great Britain, I know, require the most vigorous measures ; but then the courage of a handful of brave men should be exerted only where there is some hope of a favourable event.
Página 310 - ... his humanity, courtesy and affability was such, that he would have been thought to have been bred in the best courts, but that his good nature, charity and delight in doing good, and in communicating all he knew, exceeded that breeding.
Página 312 - ... of his father. He was a man of a very extraordinary person and presence, which drew the eyes of all men upon him, which were more fixed by a wonderful graceful behaviour, a flowing courtesy and civility, and such a volubility of language, as surprised and delighted...
Página 363 - I slept soundly till three o'clock, awaked, and then writ these lines : " ' Come, pleasing Rest, eternal Slumber, fall ; Seal mine, that once must seal the eyes of all. Calm and composed my soul her journey takes, No guilt that troubles, and no heart that aches. Adieu ! thou Sun, all bright like her arise ; Adieu ! fair Friends, and all that's good and wise.
Página 310 - London, and in the parliament, after they were in rebellion, and in the worst times, which his age obliged him to do; and how wicked soever the actions were which were every day done, he was confident he had not given his consent to them ; but would have hindered them if he could with his own safety, to which he was always enough indulgent. If he had some infirmities with other men, they were weighed down with wonderful and prodigious abilities and excellencies in the other scale.
Página 354 - ... with, as less cumbersome and dangerous. After which they all three went into Houseman's warehouse, and concealed the watches with the small plate there, but that Terry carried away with him the great plate ; that afterwards Terry told him he carried it to How-hill, and hid it there, and then went into Scotland and disposed of it; but as to Clark, he could not tell whether he was murdered or not : he knew nothing [of him, only that they told him he was gone off.

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