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Among the works prepared, and in a state of forwardness, for the Juvenile Series are the following, viz.

MEANS AND ENDS, OR SELF TRAINING, by Miss CAROLINE SEDGWICK, Author of The Poor Rich Man, and Rich Poor Man,' 'Live and Let Live,'' Home,'&c. &c.

NEW-ENGLAND HISTORICAL SKETCHES, by N. HAWTHORNE, Author of · Twice Told Tales,' fc.

CONVERSATIONS AND STORIES BY THE FIRE SIDE, by Mrs. SARAH J. Hale, FAILURE NOT RUIN, by HORATIO G. Hale, A. M.

TALES IN PROSE, blending instruction with amusement; by Miss Mary E. LEE, of Charleston, S. C.

PICTURES OF EARLY LIFE:-Stories; each inculcating some moral lesson ; by Mrs. EMMA C. EMBURY, of Brooklyn, N. Y.

FREDERICK HASKELL'S VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD, by H. G. Hale, A. M., Philologist to the Exploring Expedition.

BIOGRAPHY FOR THE YOUNG, by Miss E. RobBINS, Author of American Popular Lessons,' Sequel to the same, &c.

THE WONDERS OF NATURE, by A. J. STANSBURY, Esq., of Washington City ; illustrated by numerous cuts.

WORKS OF ART, by the same ; illustrated by numerous cuts.

PLEASURES OF TASTE, AND OTHER STORIES selected from the Writings of JANE Taylor, with a sketch of her life, (and a likeness,) by Mrs. S. J. HALE.

SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF MRS. BARBAULD, with a Life and Portrait.

SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF MARIA EDGEWORTH, with a Life and Portrait.'

SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF MRS. SHERWOOD, with a Life and Portrait.

SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS OF DR. AIKIN, with a Sketch of kis Life, by Mrs. Hale.

CHEMISTRY FOR BEGINNERS, by BENJAMIN SIlLIMAN, Jr., Assistant in the Department of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology in Yale College ; aided by Professor SILLIMAN.

MY SCHOOLS AND MY TEACHERS, by Mrs. A. H. LINCOLN Phelps.

The author's design, in this work, is to describe the Common Schools as they were in New-England at the beginning of the present century ; to delineate the peculiar characters of different Teachers ; and to give a sketch of her various school companions, with their progress in after life, endeavoring thereby to show that the child, while at school, is forming the future man, or woman.

It is not the intention of the Publishers to drive these works through the Press with a railroad speed, in the hope of securing the market, by the multiplicity of the publications cast upon the community; they rely for patronage, upon the intrinsic merits of the works, and consequently time must be allowed the writers to mature and systematize them. The more surely to admit of this, the two Series will be issued in sets of five and ten volumes at a time. Besides the advantage above alluded to, that will result from such an arrangement, it will place THE SCHOOL LiBRARY within the reach of those Districts, which, from the limited amount of their annual funds, would not otherwise be enabled to procure it.

The works will be printed on paper and with type expressly manufactured for the Library; will be bound in cloth, with leather backs and corners, having gilt titles upon the backs, and for greater durability, cloth hinges inside of the covers.

The larger Series will be furnished to Schools, Academies, &c., at seventy-five cents per volume, and the Juvenile Series at forty cents per volume ; which the Publishers advisedly declare to be cheaper, than any other series of works that can be procured at home or abroad, bearing in mind their high intellectual character, and the style of their mechanical execution.

The Publishers solicit orders from School Committees, Trustees, Teachers, and others, for either or both Series, and wish particular directions how, to whom, and to what place the books shall be forwarded.

Annexed are Specimen Pages of the two Series.

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carried into the reservoir, and they fill it half full of water, C; the mouth of the pipe, D, which is to convey away the water, reaches into the water in the reservoir. As the water rises, the air is compressed : so that, although the pumps act alternately, the elasticity of the contained air acts uninterruptedly in pressing on the surface of the water, and raising it by the tube, D, in an equable stream.

The elasticity of the contained air, fills up the interval between the actions of the pumps, and admits of no interruption to the force with which the water is propelled upwards.

Surely these are sufficient indications of the necessity of three powers acting in propelling the blood from the heart. The first, is a sudden and powerful action of the ventricle : the second, is a contraction of the artery, somewhat similar, excited by its distention : the third, though a property independent of life, is a power permitting no interval or alternation; it is the elasticity of the coats of the artery : and these three powers, duly adjusted, keep up a continued stream in the blood-vessels. It is true, that when an artery is wounded, the blood flows

The superior sagacity of animals which hunt their prey, and which, consequently, depend for their livelihood upon their nose, is well known in its use; but not at all known in the organization which produces it.

The external ears of beasts of prey, of lions, tigers, wolves, have their trumpet-part, or concavity, standing forward, to seize the sounds which are before them— viz., the sounds of the animals which they pursue or watch. The ears of animals of fight are turned backward, to give notice of the approach of their enemy from behind, whence he may steal upon them unseen. This is a critical distinction, and is mechanical; but it may be suggested, and, I think, not without probability, that it is the effect of continual habit.

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(Heads of the hare and wolf, showing the different manner

in which the ears are turned. —AM. ED.]

The eyes of animals which follow their prey by night, as cats, owls, &c., possess a faculty not given to those of other species, namely, of closing the pupil entirely.

It is difficult even for the imagination to conceive the feelings of such a man, at the moment of so sublime a discovery. What a bewildering crowd of conjectures must have thronged upon his mind, as to the land which lay before him, covered with darkness. That it was fruitful was evident from the vegetables which floated from its shores. He thought, too, that he perceived in the balmy air the fragrance of aromatic groves. The moving light which he had beheld, proved that it was the residence of man. But what were its inhabitants? Were they like those of other parts of the globe; or were they some strange and monstrons race, such as the imagination in those times was prone to give to all remote and unknown regions? Had he come upon some wild island, far in the Indian seas; or was this the famed Cipango itself, the object of his golden fancies? A thousand speculations of the kind must have swarmed upon him, as he watched for the night to pass away; wondering whether the morning light would reveal a savage wilderness, or dawn upon spicy groves, and glittering sanes, and gilded cities, and all the splendors of oriental civilization.

CHAPTER XI.

First Landing of Columbus in the New World.Cruise among the Bahama Islands.-Discovery of Cuba and Hispaniola. [1492.]

When the day dawned, Columbus saw before him a level and beautiful island, several leagues in. extent, of great freshness and verdure, and covered with trees like a continual orchard. Though every thing appeared in the wild luxuriance of untamed nature, yet the island was evidently populous, for the inhabitants were seen issuing from the woods, and running from all parts to the shore. They were all perfectly naked, and from their attitudes

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