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EDITOR'S NOTE

The text of Byron's poetry here presented was prepared some seven or eight years ago, and the notes written, before the new seven-volume edition published by Mr. Murray (grandson of the John Murray who was Byron's friend and original publisher) was on the market. It seemed advisable, however, to hold the manuscript until the completion of this elaborate work, in order that the new material taken by Mr. Ernest Hartley Coleridge from various MSS. might be included. Mr. Coleridge's text is based on the edition of 1831; and where possible has been collated with the original autographs. By the present editor the edition of 1832–33 was adopted as the more desirable guide. The Fords are with few exceptions the same in both sources, but there is considerable variance in the use of capitals and italics, the advantage being in favor of the later publication. Byron, it is known, was perfectly reckless in these matters, and the printed texts represent the taste of Murray's advisers rather than that of the poet. With the exception of marking the è in ed when pronounced, and other minor alterations, the present text conforms in respect to spelling, capitals, and italics with that of 1832–33. The usage is inconsistent, if not freakish, but there is some profit, perhaps, in thus preserving the atmosphere and emphasis of the author's age. The punctuation was a more difficult problem. Byron himself was content to sprinkle his page with dashes, and Murray's printer put in points and commas where he chose. Since the old punctuation did not at all emanate from the poet, and since it is often annoying, not to say misleading, no scruple has been felt in altering it as far as was desired. The task was difficult and unsatisfactory, for the long sentences and loose grammar of Byron made a complete change to the modern system impracticable. The result is a somewhat arbitrary compromise, but offers to the reader, it is hoped, fewer obstacles than he will meet in any other edition.

After the completion of the new Murray edition the manuscript of the present text was compared with that word for word, and advantage was taken of the very few corrections based on the MSS. accessible to Mr. Coleridge. In general it may be said that this collation confirmed the present editor in his opinion that the edition of 1832–33 is a better guide than that of 1831. But it would be ungenerous to slur over the obligation to that monumental undertaking, and in particular acknowledgment is due (and, in each specific case, given) for the new material there for the first time printed.

In the arrangement of the poems two things were aimed at - chronology and convenience. An absolute ordering in accordance with chronology is practically impos le; it would necessitate, for instance, the insertion of a mass of stuff between the two parts of Childe Harold, and would result in other obvious absurdities. A compromise was therefore adopted. The poems are arranged in groups, Childe Harold, Shorter Poems, Satires, Tales, Italian Poems, Dramas, Don Juan, and these groups are placed in general chronological sequence. In this way it is easy to perceive how Byron's manner passed from genre to genre as his genius developed. Within each group the poems follow strictly the date of composition, or, when this is unknown, the date of publication.

The notes, owing to the size of the volume, are confined to such points as are necessary for rendering the text intelligible. Byron was already well annotated, and large use has mwen made of the traditional matter handed down from the editions published immediately

after the poet's death. The language of rese notes has been adopted, or adapted, with out scruple. Some assistance, too, has een derived from the investigations of Me Coleridge; yet with all these helps no sli. at amount of labor has been expended by the present editor in the pursuit of accuracy and serviceability. Almost all of Byron's ow notes have been taken over. But the long excursions, which were appended to Childe Harold and some of the other poems, have been omitted. These were, in part, the work of Hobhouse, and for the rest belong with Byron's prose works rather than with his verse They would only increase the bulk of the volume without adding appreciably to its value a

In both the body of the book and the notes, all matter not proceeding from Byron himself is inclosed in square brackets.

P. E. M.

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ON THE EYES OF M188 A- H 143

STANZAS TO JESSY

143

EGOTISM. A LETTER TO J. T. BECHER 144

QUERIES TO CASUISTS

145

THE ADIEU

145

TO A VAIN LADY

146

To ANNE

147

"O THE SAME

147

To THE AUTHOR OF A SONNET BE-

GINNING,

“SAD IS MY VERSE," YOU

SAY, AND YET NO TEAR

147

ON FINDING A FAN

148

FAREWELL TO THE MUSE

148

Το AN OAK AT NEWSTEAD

149

ON REVISITING HARROW

150

TO MY SON

150

SONG. BREEZE OF THE NIGHT,' ETC. 150

To HARRIET

151

* FAREWELL!

EVER FONDEST

PRAYER

151

BRIGHT BE THE

PLACE

CE OF TAY

SOUL

151

• WHEN WE TWO PARTED

PARTED

151

THERE WAS A TIME, I NEED NOT

NAME

152

• AND WILT THOU WEEP WHEN I AM

LOW?!

152

•REMIND NE NOT, REMIND ME NOT' 152

To A YOUTHFUL FRIEND

153

LINES INSCRIBED UPON A CUP FORMED

FROM A SKULL

153

INSCRIPTION ON THE MONUMENT OF

A NEWFOUNDLAND DOG

154

WELL! THOU ART HAPPY

154

To A LADY, ON BEING_ASKED MY

REASON FOR QUITTING ENGLAND IN

THE SPRING

155

'FILL THE GOBLET'

155

STANZAS TO A LADY ON LEAVING

ENGLAND

126

LINES TO MR. HODGSON.

156

LINES WRITTEN IN AN ALBUM, AT

MALTA

157

To FLORENCE

157

STANZAS COMPOSED DUI

DURING A THUN:

DER-STORM

STANZAS WRITTEN IN PASSING THE

AMBRACIAN GULF

159

"THE SPELL IS BROKE, THE CHARM

IS FLOWN

159

THE GIRL OF CADIZ

159

WRITTEN AFTER SWIMMING FROM

SESTOS TO ABYDOS

160

Maid OF ATHENS, ERE WE PART 160

FRAGMENT FROM MONK OF

ATHOS'

161

LINES WRITTEN BENEATH A PICTURE 161

SUBSTITUTE FOR AN EPITAPH

161

TRANSLATION OF THE FAMOUS GREEK

WAR SoNG, Δεύτε παίδες των Ελλήνων 161

TRANSLATION OF THE ROMAIC SONG,

Μπένω μεσ' το περιβόλι, Ωραιοτάτη Χαηδή 162

LINES WRITTEN IN THE TRAVELLERS'

BOOK AT ORCHOMENUS

162

ON PARTING

162

EPITAPH FOR JOSEPH BLACKET

163

FAREWELL TO MALTA

103

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• WHEN COLDNESS WRAPS THIS SUF-

TERING CLAY

220

VISION OF BELSHAZZAR.

220

SON OF THE SLEEPLEAS

220

WERE MY BOSOM AS FALSE AS THOU

DEEM'ST IT TO BE

221

HEROD'S LAMENT FOR MARIAMNE 221

ON THE DAY OF THE DESTRUCTION

OF JERUSALEM BY TITUS

221

BY THE RIVERS OF BABYLON WE SAT

DOWN AND WEPT

222

THE DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB 222

' A SPIRIT PASS'D BEFORE ME.' FROM

Јов

222

'IN THE VALLEY OF WATERS' 222

STANZAS FOR MUSIC. THEY SAY THAT

HOPE IS HAPPINESS

223

EPHEMERAL VERSES.

EPIGRAM ON AN OLD LADY WHO HAD

SOME CURIOUS NOTIONS RESPECT-

ING THE SOUL

223

(To Dives (William BECKFORD). A

FRAGMENT)

223

EPITAPH ON JOHN ADAMS, OF SOUTH-

WELL.

224

FAREWELL PETITION TO J. C. H., Esq: 224

"OH HOW I WISH THAT AN EMBARGO 225

* YOUTH, NATURE, AND RELENTING

Jove'

225

'GOOD PLAYS ARE SCARCE

SCARCE;

225

WHAT NEWS, WHAT NEWS? QUEEN

ORRACA

225

AN ODE TO THE FRAMERS OF THE

FRAME BILL

225

(R. C. DALLAS)

226

OH YOU, WHO IN ALL NAMES CAN

TICKLE THE TOWN'.

226

•WHEN THURLOW THIS DAMN'D NON-

SENSE SENT'

226

To LORD THURLOW

227

ANSWER TO -'s PROFESSIONS OF

AFFECTION

227

FRAGMENT

OF AN EPISTLE TO THOMAS

MOORE

227

WINDSOR POETICS

228

ON A ROYAL VISIT TO THE VAULT: 228

228

HERE'S TO HER WHO LONG' 228

ONCE FAIRLY SET OUT ON HIS PARTY

OF PLEASURE

228

IN THIS BELOVED MARBLE VIEW 229

' AND DOST THOU ASK THE REASON

OF MY SADNESS?'

229

As THE LIBERTY LADS O'ER THE

229

SO WE'LL GO NO MORE A ROVING · 229

I READ THE “CHRISTABEL

230

'TO HOOK THE READER, YOU, JOHN

MURRAY'

230

•GOD MADDENS HIM WHOM 'T IS HIS

WILL TO LOSE

230

"MY BOAT IS ON THE SHORE

230

NO INFANT SOTHEBY, WHOSE DAUNT-

LESS HEAD'

231

'DEAR DOCTOR, I HAVE READ YOUR

PLAY'

231

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