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Ulr. His tale is true.
Sieg.
Ulr.

As might have envied mine, I offer'd you My purse-you would not share it: I'll be franker

With you; you are wealthy, noble, trusted by The imperial powers understand me? Sieg. Yes. Gab. Not quite. You think me venal, and scarce true:

you

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True, monster!

Most true, father! And you did well to listen to it: what We know, we can provide against. He

must Be silenced. Sieg.

Ay, with half of my domains; And with the other half, could he and thou Unsay this villany.

Ulr.

It is no time For trifling or dissembling. I have said His story's true; and he too must be silenced.

Sieg. How so?

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Ulr. As Stralenheim is. Are you so dull As never to have hit on this before? When we met in the garden, what except Discovery in the act could make me know His death? Or had the prince's household been

Then summon'd, would the cry for the police

Been left to such a stranger? Or should I Have loiter'd on the way? Or could you, Werner,

The object of the baron's hate and fears, Have fled, unless by many an hour before Suspicion woke? I sought and fathom'd

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Ashes are feeble foes: it is more easy
To baffle such, than countermine a mole
Which winds its blind but living path be-
neath you.

Yet hear me still! if you condemn me,
yet
Remember who hath taught me once too
often
To listen to him! Who proclaim'd to me
That there were crimes made venial by the
occasion?

440

That passion was our nature? that the goods

Of Heaven waited on the goods of fortune?

Who show'd me his humanity secured
By his nerves only? Who deprived me of
All power to vindicate myself and race
In open day, by his disgrace which stamp'd
(It might be) bastardy on me, and on
Himself a felon's brand? The man who

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is At once both warm and weak invites to deeds

He longs to do, but dare not. Is it strange That I should act what you could think? We have done

With right and wrong; and now must only ponder

Upon effects, not causes. Stralenheim, Whose life I saved from impulse, as, unknown,

I would have saved a peasant's or a dog's, I slew

Known as our foe but not from vengeance. He

Was a rock in our way which I cut through, As doth the bolt, because it stood between

us

460

And our true destination but not idly.
As stranger I preserved him, and he owed

me

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No more to learn or hide: I know no fear, And have within these very walls men who (Although you know them not) dare venture all things.

You stand high with the state; what passes here

Will not excite her too great curiosity: Keep your own secret, keep a steady eye, Stir not, and speak not; - leave the rest to

me:

We must have no third babblers thrust between us. [Erit ULRIC. Sieg. (solus). Am I awake? are these my father's halls? And you

my son? My son! mine! who have ever 480 Abhorr'd both mystery and blood, and yet Am plunged into the deepest hell of both! I must be speedy, or more will be shedThe Hungarian's! — Ulric - he hath partisans,

It seems I might have guess'd as much.
Oh fool!
Wolves prowl in company. He hath the
key

(As I too) of the opposite door which leads Into the turret. Now then! or once more To be the father of fresh crimes, no less Than of the criminal! Ho! Gabor! Gabor!

490

[Exit into the turret, closing the door after him.

SCENE II

The Interior of the Turret.

GABOR and SIEGENDORF.

Gab. Who calls? Sieg.

I-Siegendorf! Take

these, and fly! Lose not a moment!

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Or I would bid them fall and crush me! Fly!

will be slain by

Or you
Gab.

500

Is it even so ? Farewell, then! Recollect, however, Count, You sought this fatal interview!

Sieg. Stop! I command-
plore! Oh, Ulric!

Will you then leave me ?
Ulr.
What! remain to be
Denounced dragg'd, it may be, in chains;
and all

By your inherent weakness, half-humanity,
Selfish remorse, and temporising pity,
That sacrifices your whole race to save
A wretch to profit by our ruin! No, count,
Henceforth you have no son!

Sieg.

530

I never had one;
had borne the useless

Sieg.

I did:
Begone!

Let it not be more fatal still!
Gab. By the same path I enter'd ?
Sieg.
Yes; that's safe still:
But loiter not in Prague; you do not know
With whom you have to deal.

Gab. I know too well, And knew it ere yourself, unhappy sire! Farewell! [Exit GABOR. Sieg. (solus and listening). He hath clear'd the staircase. Ah! I hear The door sound loud behind him! He is safe! Oh, my father's spirit! —I am faint 510 [He leans down upon a stone seat, near the wall of the lower, in a drooping posture.

Safe!

Enter ULRIC, with others armed, and with weapons drawn.

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And would you ne'er name!

Where will you go? forth

Without protection. Ulr.

entreat - im

I would not send you

Leave that unto me.

I am not alone; nor merely the vain heir Of your domains; a thousand, ay, ten thou

sand

Sieg.

Swords, hearts, and hands, are mine. The foresters ! With whom the Hungarian found you first at Frankfort! Ulr. Yes -men-who are worthy of the name! Go tell Your senators that they look well to Prague; Their feast of peace was early for the times;

540

There are more spirits abroad than have been laid

With Wallenstein!

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Of the near fountain my sole elegy. Now, knife, stand firmly, as I fain would fall!

[As he rushes to throw himself upon the knife, his eye is suddenly caught by the fountain, which seems in motion.

The fountain moves without a wind: but shall

The ripple of a spring change my resolve? No. Yet it moves again! The waters stir, Not as with air, but by some subterrane And rocking power of the internal world. 80 What's here? A mist! No more ?[A cloud comes from the fountain. He stands gazing upon it; it is dispelled, and a tall black man comes towards him.

What would you? Speak!

Arn.
Spirit or man?
Stran.

As man is both, why not

Say both in one?
Arn.
Your form is man's, and yet
You may be devil.

Stran.
So many men are that
Which is so call'd or thought, that you may
add me

To which you please, without much wrong to either.

But come: you wish to kill yourself;

Mine, and for ever, by your suicide; And yet my coming saves you.

Arn.

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pursue

Your purpose.
Arn.

You have interrupted me. Stran. What is that resolution which can e'er

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Be interrupted? If I be the devil You deem, a single moment would have made you

I said not You were the demon, but that your approach Was like one.

Stran. Unless you keep company With him (and you seem scarce used to such high

Society) you can't tell how he approaches;
And for his aspect, look upon the fountain,
And then on me, and judge which of us
twain
Looks likest what the boors believe to be 100
Their cloven-footed terror.
Arn.
Do you dare you
To taunt me with my born deformity?
Stran. Were I to taunt a buffalo with
this
Cloven foot of thine, or the swift drome-

dary

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