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Against the stream and three postillions' wishes,

Is drown'd below the ford, with five post-
horses,

A monkey, and a mastiff, and a valet.
Jos. Poor creatures! are you sure?
Iden.
Yes, of the monkey,
And the valet, and the cattle; but as yet
We know not if his excellency 's dead
Or no; your noblemen are hard to drown, 220
As it is fit that men in office should be.
But what is certain is, that he has swallow'd
Enough of the Oder to have burst two
peasants;

And now a Saxon and Hungarian traveller,
Who at their proper peril snatch'd him from
The whirling river, have sent on to crave
A lodging, or a grave, according as
It may turn out with the live or dead body.
Jos. And where will you receive him?
here, I hope.
If we can be of service
- say the word.
Iden. Here? no; but in the prince's own
apartment,

230

As fits a noble guest: 't is damp, no doubt, Not having been inhabited these twelve years;

But then he comes from a much damper place,

So scarcely will catch cold in 't, if he be
Still liable to cold- and if not, why
He'll be worse lodged to-morrow: ne'er-
theless

I have order'd fire and all appliances
To be got ready for the worst-
In case he should survive.

- that is,

This is the palace; this a stranger like
Yourself; I pray you make yourself at

home.

Have you not learn'd his
Josephine,

But where 's his excellency? and how fares he?

Jos.

Poor gentleman! 240
I hope he will, with all my heart.
Wer.

Gab. Wetly and wearily, but out of peril: He paused to change his garments in a cottage

(Where I doff'd mine for these, and came on hither),

And has almost recover'd from his drenching.

He will be here anon.

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Iden.
What ho, there! bustle!
Without there, Herman, Weilburg, Peter,
Conrad!

Intendant, name? — My [Aside to his wife.

His soaking in your river: but for fear Your viands should be thrown away, I mean To sup myself, and have a friend without Who will do honour to your good cheer with A traveller's appetite. Iden. His excellency – it? Gab. I do not know. His name? oh Lord! Iden. Who knows if he hath now a name or no? 'Tis time enough to ask it when he's able To give an answer; or if not, to put His heir's upon his epitaph. Methought Just now you chid me for demanding

Retire; I'll sift this fool.

259

[Gives directions to different servants who enter. see that A nobleman sleeps here to-night All is in order in the damask chamber Keep up the stove-I will myself to the cellar

And Madame Idenstein (my consort, stranger)

Shall furnish forth the bed-apparel; for, say the truth, they are marvellous scant of this

To

Within the palace precincts, since his high

ness

And then
Left it some dozen years ago.
His excellency will sup, doubtless?
Gab.

Faith!

I cannot tell; but I should think the pillow Would please him better than the table after

270

names?

Wer. True, true, I did so; you say well
and wisely.

250

But are you sure But his name: what is

Iden.
And yet you saved his life.
Gab. I help'd my friend to do so.
Iden.
Well, that's strange,
To save a man's life whom you do not know.
Gab. Not so; for there are some I know
so well,

280

I scarce should give myself the trouble.
Iden.

Pray,

Good friend, and who may you be?
Gab.
By my family,
Hungarian.
Iden.

Which is call'd?

Gab.
It matters little.
Iden. (aside). I think that all the world
are grown anonymous,

Since no one cares to tell me what he's call'd!
Pray, has his excellency a large suite?
Gab.

Sufficient.

Iden. How many? Gab. I did not count them. We came up by mere accident, and just In time to drag him through his carriage

window.

Iden. Well, what would I give to save a great man!

290

No doubt you'll have a swingeing sum as recompense. Gab. Perhaps.

Iden. Now, how much do you reckon on? Gab. I have not yet put up myself to sale: In the mean time, my best reward would be A glass of your Hockcheimer - a green glass, Wreath'd with rich grapes and Bacchanal devices,

O'erflowing with the oldest of your vintage; For which I promise you, in case you e'er Run hazard of being drown'd (although I

own

It seems, of all deaths, the least likely for you),

300

I'll pull you out for nothing. Quick, my friend,

And think, for every bumper I shall quaff, A wave the less may roll above your head. Iden. (aside). I don't much like this fellow close and dry

-

He seems, two things which suit me not;

however,

Wine he shall have; if that unlocks him not, I shall not sleep to-night for curiosity. [Erit IDENSTEIN.

Gab. (to WERNER). This master of the ceremonies is

The intendant of the palace, I presume: 309 'Tis a fine building, but decay'd.

Wer. The apartment Design'd for him you rescued will be found In fitter order for a sickly guest.

Gab. I wonder then you occupied it not, For you seem delicate in health.

Wer. (quickly).

Sir! Gab. Pray, Excuse me have I said aught to offend you?

Wer. Nothing but we are strangers to each other.

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ne'er

Beheld till half an hour since?
Wer.
Sir, I thank you. 360
Your offer 's noble were it to a friend,
And not unkind as to an unknown stranger,
Though scarcely prudent; but no less I
thank you.

I am a beggar in all save his trade;
And when I beg of any one, it shall be
Of him who was the first to offer what
Few can obtain by asking. Pardon me.
[Exit WER.
Gab. (solus). A goodly fellow by his
looks, though worn,

As most good fellows are, by pain or pleas

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380

Which still improves the one, should spoil the other. Fill full- Here's to our hostess!-your fair wife! [Takes the glass. Iden. Fair!- Well, I trust your taste in wine is equal

To that you show for beauty; but I pledge you Nevertheless.

Gab. Is not the lovely woman I met in the adjacent hall, who, with An air and port and eye, which would have better

Enter IDENSTEIN.

Iden. 'T is here! the supernaculum ! twenty years Of age, if 't is a day.

Gab. Which epoch makes Young women and old wine; and 'tis great pity, Of two such excellent things, increase of

years,

Beseem'd this palace in its brightest days
(Though in a garb adapted to its present
Abandonment), return'd my salutation
Is not the same your spouse?

390

Iden. I would she were! But you're mistaken:- that's the stranger's wife.

Gab. And by her aspect she might be a prince's:

Though time hath touch'd her too, she still retains

Much beauty, and more majesty.
Iden.

And that Is more than I can say for Madame Idenstein,

At least in beauty: as for majesty,

She has some of its properties which might
Be spared but never mind!
Gab.
I don't. But who
May be this stranger? He too hath a
bearing

Above his outward fortunes.

400

Iden. There I differ. He's poor as Job, and not so patient; but Who he may be, or what, or aught of

him,

Except his name (and that I only learn'd To-night), I know not.

Gab. But how came he here? Iden. In a most miserable old caleche, About a month since, and immediately Fell sick, almost to death. He should have died.

Gab. Tender and true! - but why? Iden. Why, what is life Without a living? He has not a stiver. Gab. In that case, I much wonder that a person

410

Of your apparent prudence should admit Guests so forlorn into this noble mansion. Iden. That's true; but pity, as you know, does make

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A spy of my pursuer's? His frank offer
So suddenly, and to a stranger, wore
The aspect of a secret enemy;
For friends are slow at such.
Gab.
Sir, you seem rapt;
And yet the time is not akin to thought. 450
These old walls will be noisy soon. The

baron,

Or count (or whatsoe'er this half-drown'd noble

May be), for whom this desolate village and
Its lone inhabitants show more respect
Than did the elements, is come.
This way

Iden. (without).

This way, your excellency: - have a care, The staircase is a little gloomy, and Somewhat decay'd: but if we had expected So high a guest Pray take my arm, my lord!

459

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Enter STRALENHEIM, IDENSTEIN, and Attendants — partly his own, and partly Retainers of the Domain of which IDENSTEIN is Intendant.

Stral. I'll rest me here a moment. Iden. (to the servants). Ho! a chair! Instantly, knaves! [STRALENHEIM sits down.

Wer. (aside). "T is he!

Stral.

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I'm better now.

Who are these strangers?
Iden.
Please you, my good lord,
One says he is no stranger.

Wer. (aloud and hastily). Who says that?
[They look at him with surprise.
Iden. Why, no one spoke of you, or to
you! - but

Here's one his excellency may be pleased
To recognise.
[Pointing to GABOR.
Gab.
I seek not to disturb
His noble memory.

Stral.

I apprehend

This is one of the strangers to whose aid I owe my rescue. Is not that the other? 469 [Pointing to WERNER. My state when I was succour'd must excuse My uncertainty to whom I owe so much. Iden. He!. no, my lord, he rather wants for rescue

Than can afford it. 'T is a poor sick man, Travel-tired, and lately risen from a bed From whence he never dream'd to rise. Methought

Stral.

That there were two.
Gab.
There were, in company;
But, in the service render'd to your lord-
ship,

I needs must say but one, and he is absent.

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