The Gentleman's Magazine, Volumen 89,Parte 2;Volumen 126

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F. Jefferies, 1819
The "Gentleman's magazine" section is a digest of selections from the weekly press; the "(Trader's) monthly intelligencer" section consists of news (foreign and domestic), vital statistics, a register of the month's new publications, and a calendar of forthcoming trade fairs.
 

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Página 57 - and attentively read these Holy Scriptures, and am of opinion that this " Volume, independently of its divine origin, contains more true sublimity, ' more exquisite beauty, more pure morality, more important history, and * finer strains both of Poetry and Eloquence, than can be' collected from * all other books, in whatever age or language they may have been composed.
Página 140 - I was pleased with the reply of a gentleman, who being asked which book he esteemed most in his library, answered, — "Shakspeare": being asked which he esteemed next best, replied — "Hogarth.
Página 54 - For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will I arise, saith the LORD; I will set him in safety from him that puffeth at him.
Página 112 - See how the world its veterans rewards ! A youth of frolics, an old age of cards ; Fair to no purpose, artful to no end, Young without lovers, old without a friend ; A fop their passion, but their prize a sot, Alive ridiculous, and dead forgot ! Ah friend ! to dazzle let the vain design ; To raise the thought and touch the heart be thine!
Página 464 - But to those to whom he more immediately belonged, — who lived in his society, and enjoyed his conversation, it is not, perhaps, the character in which he will be most frequently recalled— most deeply lamented — or even most highly admired. Independently of his great attainments in mechanics, Mr. Watt was an extraordinary, and in many respects a wonderful man. Perhaps no individual in his age possessed so much and such varied and exact information, —had read so much, or remembered what he...
Página 440 - See the wretch, that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again : The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.
Página 333 - What then ? notwithstanding, every way, whether in pretence, or in truth, Christ is preached; and I therein do rejoice, yea, and will rejoice.
Página 141 - The stage but echoes back the public voice ; The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live. Then prompt no more the follies you decry, As tyrants doom their tools of guilt to die ; 'Tis yours, this night, to bid the reign commence Of rescued Nature and reviving Sense ; To chase the charms of sound, the pomp of show, For useful mirth and salutary woe ; Bid scenic Virtue form the rising age, And Truth diffuse her radiance from the stage.
Página 558 - Most Gracious Sovereign, WE, your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Oxford, beg leave to approach your Majesty's throne with the renewed assurance of our devoted attachment.
Página 112 - Still out of reach, yet never out of view ; Sure, if they catch, to spoil the toy at most, To covet flying, and regret when lost : At last to follies youth could scarce defend.

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