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154

TRANSLATIONS.

The Story of Aglauros, transformed into a
Statue

135 Europa's Rape

140
Ovid Metam. Book III.
The Story of Cadmus

144
The Transformation of Actxon into a Stag 150
The Birth of Bacchus
The Transformation of Tiresias

157 The Transformation of Echo

158 The Story of Narcissus

160 The Story of Pentheus

165 The Mariners transformed to Dolphins 167 The Death of Pentheus

172 Ovid Met. Book IV.

The Story of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus 174
Notes on the foregoing Stories in Ovid's Mea

tamorphoses
On the Story of Phaeton

179 On Europa's Rape

186 On the Stories in the Third Book Fab. I.

187 Fab. II.

192 Fab. III.

193 Fab. V.

194 Fab. VI.

196 Fab. VII.

198 Fab. VIII. IX.

198 Essay on Virgil's Georgics

200

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222

MISCELLANEOUS Poems.

To Sir Godfrey Kneller, on his **ure of the

King
Prologue to Smith's Phædra and Hippolitus 215
Prologue to Steele's Tender Husband

216 Epilogue to Lansdowne's Britith Enchanters 218 An Ode for St. Cecilia's Day

219 An Ode An Hymn

223 An Ode

225 An Hymn

227 Paraphrase on Psalm xxiii.

229 The Play-house

230 On the Lady Manchester Verses to the Author of the Tragedy of Cato 237–

242 left with the Printer by an unknown hand 243 upon Mr. Addison's Cato

245 on Cato, occafioned by Mr. Addison's Tra.

gedy of that Name. By Mr. Copping 247 Prologue by Mr. Pope

248 Cato

251 Epilogue by Sir S. Garth

339

234

THE END OF ADDISON'S POEMS.

MARCIA.

Alas! 'tis not the voice Of one who sleeps ! 'tis agonizing pain, 'Tis death is in that sound

Re-enter PORTIUS.

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POR T IUS.

O fight of woe! O Marcia, what we fear'd is come to pass ! Cato is fall’n upon his sword

LUCIUS.

o Portius, Hide all the horrors of thy mournful tale, And let us guess the rest.

PORTIUS.

I've rais'd him up, And plac'd him in his chair, where, pale and faint, He gasps for breath, and, as his life flows from him, Demands to see his friends. His weeping servants, Obsequious to his orders, bear him hither. [The back Scene opens, and discovers CATO.

MARCIA. O heaven, aslift me in this dreadful hour Το pay the last fad duties to

my

father!

JUBA. These are thy triumphs, thy exploits, o Cæfar!

LUCIUS. Now is Rome fall’n indeed !

(CATO brought forward in bis chair.

CATO. CA TO.

Here fet me down Portius, come near me--are my friends embark'd ? Can any thing be thought of for their service ? Whilst I yet live, let me not live in vain. -O Lucius, art thou here ? -Thou art too good ! Let this our friendship live between our children ; Make Portíus happy in thy daughter Lucia. Alas poor man, he weeps !-Marcia, my daughter

-o bend me forward !- Juba loves thee, Marcia. A Senator of Rome, while Rome furviv’d, Would not have match'd his daughter with a king, But Cæsar's arms have thrown down all distinction; Whoe'er is brave and virtuous, is a Roman -I’m fick to death.O when shall I

get

loose From this vain world, th'abode of guilt and sorrow!..

- And yet methinks a beam of light breaks in
On my departing foul. Alas, I fear
I've been too hasty. Oye powers, that search
The heart of man, and weigh his inmost thoughts,
If I have done amifs, impute it not!
The best may err, but you are good, and mo ) ![Dies.

LUCIUS.
There fled the greatest soul that ever warm d
A Roman breast. O Cato! O my friend!
Thy will shall be religiously observ’d.
But let us bear this awful corpfe to Cæsar,
And lay it in his fight, that it may

ftand
A fence betwixt us and the victor's wrath ;
Cato, though dead, shall still protect his friends.

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