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in his harmless caprices, I soon procured one, may be, a bottle to boot. We commence by his comrade in full uniform suspended from a who answered exactly to his description. But quoting the Soldier's Wife :

tree? Such sights may, and do, affect soldiers the following day, seeing that he did not men “ " Who comes there?' said a sentinel to a at the time, but they never will view it as tion the subject, I avoided recalling it to his person coming near his post. "A friend,'| justice: it is degrading to them in the extreme. memory. It is in the Levant an almost uni. softly said a timid voice. Advance, and give Shooting is more congenial to their modes of yersal practice, as soon as a person falls ill, to the parole.' The same soft, timid voice said, thinking, and to mine too. There is something have recourse, in the first instance, to one of Love.' • Love,' said the sentinel, “is not noble in seeing a soldier meeting the offended these professed exorcisers. If their art does the parole, and you cannot pass. It is more laws of his country in the same haughty and not succeed in restoring the patient to bealth, than my life is worth, to permit you to pass. manly spirit he met his country's foes; but by destroying the power of fascination, then. Indeed, this is cruel indeed, not to allow a dragging him to the gallows is, I repeat, a slur the medical man is called in. But without this sergeant's wife to pass, to take perhaps her last upon the profession of arms." previous preparation, none of his medicines farewell. I beseech you to let me pass; ere We quote one more extract, which we sinare supposed to be capable of curing the com- the morning's battle takes place, let me spend cerely hope is nothing less than a libel. plaint."

this night in his company. I have travelled “ A military chaplain had become so shame. We will not enter into the anatomical details forty miles to see him.' Pass, friend : all 's fully drunk at the mess on the Saturday night, of appearances after death, except in one in. well!' It proved her last farewell.”

that three or four of those last remaining were

There are one or two anecdotes, such as obliged to carry him home. On the following “ The appearance presented by the heart" the Regimental Dog,” which will not suffer morning, to the astonishment of his dear com. was singular. Its parietes were as collapsed, us to entertain the supposition that “ spinning panions, he took the following text: A drunkand of a consistence as flabby, as of those per- a long yarn" is by any means confined to the ard shall not enter the kingdom of heaven;' sons who have died of old age.”

pavy:

We must also take the freedom of ob. and handled the subject with all the eloquence We certainly are all most ingenious in self-serving, that when an author's title-page pro- and pathos of a saint. During the oration, deception : Mr. Millingen winds up by stating. claims the contents of his volumes to be the some of the young ones had the greatest diffiI am incapable of enumerating the faults of gleanings of active service, it is unwise to culty to restrain their risible muscles ; and, one from whom I received so many marks of designate any particular anecdote as “a fact.” meeting the reverend gentleman after the serkindness, merely to gratify the curiosity of the We deprecate this, because some unreasonable mon, one of them said, “My dear doctor, you idle, or the malice of bis enemies.

people will take the hint that its less marked have astonished the whole regiment this mornNow our author repeatedly alludes to his companions are not such. We give the annexed ing by the beautiful sermon on drunkenness,— noble friend's vanity, pride,' affectation, in- selections as characteristic of Shipp's feelings the last subject in the world we should have ebriety, betrayal of confidence, his sarcastic on some subjects, which cannot but gain him supposed you would have touched upon. My spirit, his want of religion : if he does not con- credit, and which, to do him justice, he never dear fellow,' calmly replied the divine, “if you sider these as faults, pray what does he think loses an opportunity of advocating.

had such a d-dheadach as I have, you them?

The Drummed-out Soldier.

would preach against it too.' We shall proceed to make a cento from the

In conclusion, we give John Shipp a friendly various anecdotes scattered through these

“However necessary punishment may be in word of caution, to leave off sentimentalising, pages; but it must be next Saturday.

the army, and that it is necessary is beyond a more especially about rockets and cannon-balls, doubt, still I have ever been of opinion that to relinquish' his addiction to grandeur of

punishments whereby the delinquent is debased, language, and a too general redundancy of The Military Bijou ; or, the Contents of a and held up as a public object of derision and epithets. We have retrained from particular.

Soldier's Knapsack : being the Gleanings of laughter, are injurious. The act of such dis- ising, and shall regret if our advice does not Thirty-three Years' Active Service. By grace is a positive detraction from the respect- obviate these defects, and lead him henceforth John Shipp. 2 vols. 12mo. London, 1831. ability of the military profession. No soldier, to study a style more becoming. His object Whittaker and Co.

whatever his offence, ought to be degraded as should be to write as the plain, straightforward Our readers, we do not doubt, will remember a common vagabond. What can reflect more soldier ; in which case, the adventures of his the Autobiography

of John Shipp. We trust discredit on the British soldier than the lower life will not fail to supply literary occupation that, in recalling to their recollection the nar- ing spectacle of tying a rope round his neck, and emolument to himself, while it affords rative of his life, we shall not fail to create a

a placard pinned upon his back, facings and to the public amusing illustrations of the prejudice in favour of the Contents of a Soldier's buttons cut off, and the Rogue's March played soldier's habits and hardships. Knapsack.

A series of desultory sketches, after him? I say it is a degradation to the written in some parts with humour, in others honourable profession of arms, and a constitu: The Talba ; or, the Moor of Portugal: a with good feeling, will, we fear not, with all tion boasting of its freedom and humanity. If

Romance. By Mrs. Bray, author of " the but the hypercritical, meet with a kind word he, the culprit, merits this, he falls beneath

White Hoods," &c. &c. 3 vols. 12mo. and a welcome. The frankness and candour the cognizance of the service, and ought to be

London, 1830. Longman and Co. of our author's preface battles the designs of transferred to the civil authorities, and there The melancholy and romantic history of the censure, and conveys the broadest hint that his crime be provided for ; but never should he unfortunate Ines de Castro is here well wrought John Shipp does not write wholly and solely be the public gaze or jeer. It is a death-blow into a chronicle of Moorish history. The for literary fame, of any man we remember to to many a young man entering into the service; Talba is a Mahometan expression, similar in have met with :

for very often, and, I fear, too often, the crime meaning to that of philosopher: Mrs. Bray has “ But this is a critical period for becoming so visited is petty thest, which the civil law made a very picturesque personage of hers ; an author ; any attempt in the form of a book would punish with a couple of months at the and she has also succeeded in giving considerhaving so much to apprebend, so much to tread-mill."

able action and interest to her narrative. The dread, in the present march of intellect,'

Ilanging Soldiers.

following scene is an animated sketch of a where there are so many spies and critical However expedient and necessary exem- combat to which a young Moor is condemned. sentinels standing upon the watch-tower of plary punishments may be deemed in the army, * All was in readiness. Alonso cast a look literature, to resist the approach of every new to check mutiny or curb the rebellious spirits on Hamet, in which there was something less adventurer, as if he were an enemy. But 1 of soldiers, and nip crime in the bud, every severe than his usual expression :- Art thou am like him who sits with a craving stomach one, on deeply considering the circumstances prepared ?' said the king, Ay, for life or by the side of a brook, watching, with eager combined with hanging, will recoil at it. It death!' replied Hamet. • Then God be thy eye, the nibbling of every little fish, on the detracts from the respectability of the profes- judge, young man,' said Alonso, as he raised hooking of which depends his dinner. If he sion; it casts a black cloud over it, putting his arm and gave the signal. The trumpet did not cast in the bait, he could not expect soldiers on a level with the lowest and veriest gave one clear and hollow blast. It curdled to catch any fish; if I did not attempt to delinquents of the earth. If a soldier deserves the blood; for it sounded like the kuell of write, I, like him, should have no dinner." death, let him die like a soldier, not like a death, to all but the obdurate of heart. Ere

Shipp, however, need not look upon his pickpocket or housebreaker. Blow him from the echoes of the surrounding mountains had volumes as altogether a “forlorn hope,” which the mouth of a gun, or let him be shot like a finished repeating the awful clarion, the bar. he is advancing against the batteries of criti- man. Hanging is no example to soldiers ; rier was thrown open ; and with one bound cism; but take heart, that, like the many he soldiers look upon it as a general disgrace or the bull burst out. With nostrils smoking, as has volunteered on, the present will come off reflection on the profession. What, permit me he uttered fearful bellowings, he stood gazing with credit; and, what is of more substantial to ask my military readers, can be more repug- around, shook bis sides, pawed the ground importance, ensure him a beefsteak, and, it want to a bold and intrepid soldier, than to see with his broad hoofs, but did not advance to

the combat. He was black in colour ; and the last efforts of his rage, that the sight of it preface, accordingly, he, evidently at the e therefore had he been named Nero. Whilst impressed horror. His blood streamed from his pense of Bruce's reputation, extols the Parts thus he stood, wild cries arose from the circus. Aanks ; he bounded, rather than ran, forward guese traveller, as one who has amused las They were strange and mingled; some seemed with dreadful bellowings. He shook his neck reader with no romantic absurdities or incredi. uttered in joy that the animal shewed little and sides, tossed the sand in his career, whilst ble fictions. He appears by his modest and es. symptoms of being willing for the attack. The volumes of smoke arose from his mouth and affected narrative to have described things u more brutal Portuguese, however,—those true nostrils. Hamet, as a final effort, determined he saw them, to have copied nature from the lovers of the game, who could forget even hu- to spring upon him ; and, for that purpose, life, and to have consulted his senses, not be manity in their sports,-greeted the creature when within a few yards of the bull, turned to imagination. He meets with no basilisks that with yells, hoots, and hissings ; since it was confront him. His foot slipped_hé fell—and destroy with their eyes, his crocodiles devues always deemed an infallible mark of cowardice the knife dropped from his hand. All hope their prey without tears, and his cataracts fa in the bull if he did not instantly attack his filed; for at this instant he stood close to the from the rock without deafening the neighbous. foe. Hamet was ready to receive him; his barrier, which cut off all retreat, and the wild ing inhabitants. These round, rigmarole ser wood.knife in his hand_his eye fixed on his bull was making towards him, with head bent, tences were rolled against Bruce, a man whe enemy. His fine person drawn to its utmost to gore him to death with his horns. A cry of had patiently visited three-quarters of the height, every muscle in his slender limbs horror arose from the arena. Hamet sprang globe, by Johnson, one of the most prejudice! seemed to swell and to shew its power, as he up. There was no escape. Ines de Castro men of his age, who, himself a traveller, w stood, 'like a greyhound on the slip,' eager for sat immediately above the very spot where the not temper enough to travel in a hack-cheie the hardy encounter."

youthful Moor was in so much danger. Quick to Aberdeen! Peter Pindar amused all people Dogs are sent in, when the bull, that had in feeling and in thought, she tore from her (except Bruce) by his satirical flings, one i been thus irritated by having the dogs turned shoulders the crimson mantle in which she was which was out upon him,--a usual practice, whenever the wrapt, and threw it into the arena with so true • Nor have I been where men, (what loss, alas" animal shewed any delay in the attack,-now a hand, that Hamet caught it-cast it over the Kill half a cow, and turn the rest to grass.** sufficiently convinced all the spectators that bull's head as he prepared to gore him and Bruce met these and other similar assanles i such delay was not from want of spirit. With ere the beast could disentangle himself from a manly way; in the way that all writers, an aspect full of savage fury, he lashed his the blind thus thrown over him, Hamet re- scious of truth and integrity, ought to meet sides with his broad tail, bellowed, tore up the covered his knife, that lay close at his feet, and misrepresentations or calumnies of the envin ground with hoof and horns, and darted for- struck it into the spine. His mighty enemy and malicious." He concludes his preface vid ward towards Hamet. The youth, by leaping fell, a convulsed corpse.”

the following noble and remarkable words:with an agility alone to be compared to the There are some very beautiful descriptions I have only to add, that were it probable, # nimble-footed chamois as it springs from rock of Portuguese scenery: Mrs. Bray sees with in my decayed state of health it is not, that! to rock, endeavoured, but in vain, to avoid the the eye of a painter ; and one great merit, should live to see a second edition of this wort. continued pursuit of the bull, -his eye ever that of historical accuracy as regards man- all well-founded, judicious remarks suggested watchful for the moment of attack. No such ners, costume, &c, her pages invariably possess. should be gratefully and carefully attended to: moment occurred; and it seemed evident that These volumes must add, therefore, to her but I do solemnly declare to the public in s bis life would terminate with the time in which already high popularity.

neral, that I never will refute or answer any he should become spent and breathless, from

cavils, captious or idle objections, such as every the violent exertions he made to preserve it. The Life of Bruce, the Abyssinian Traveller. new publication seems unavoidably to give bird Hassan saw this. He clasped his hands to By Major T. B. Head. (Family Library, to, nor ever reply to those witticisms and critgether in agony-he looked up to heaven_he XVII.) 12mo. pp. 535. London, 1830. cisms that appear in newspapers and periodic uttered fearful cries, that mingled even with J. Murray

writings. What I have written I have writte his prayers. He will die ! he will die !' ex. A FORTNIGår ago, on the issue of this new My readers have before them, in the present claimed Hassan. O for an angel's wing to volume of the Family Library, we briefly cha- volumes, all that I shall ever say, directly waft him hence in safety! Mortal aid is there racterised it as most deserving of the atten- indirectly, upon the subject; and I do, without none to save him. But see, prophet of Mecca! tion of all classes of readers, whether for one moment's anxiety, trust my defence to what a daring act! He has seized the terrible amusement or instruction; and return to it impartial, well - informed, and judicious pole animal by the horns ; he suffers himself to be now, not to alter, but to repeat and enforce our lic.” dragged round the arena. Now he hangs by verdict. To compress the marrow of Bruce's Upon these matters Major Head says welone hand: he stabs him in the throat; the five volumes into one good thickset little book “There is surely nothing which, in blood spouts like a fount of waters—but the of 535 pages, with an excellent portrait, wood- opinion of liberal men, can more degrade a brute still lives. Look ! Hamet falls from his cuts, and maps, for five shillings, is very like country-nothing which, at the great table a hold-God save thee! He is up again! he is getting the Iliad into the nutshell, and very the world, more deservedly places it below this on his feet! O, Allah, how I thank thee! deserving of public reward.

salt'-than its unreasonably disbelieving an be He flies ! he flies but look! the brute is Major Head, too, has performed his task con nourable man. A man's opinions may be casmad with fury-gored with wounds. See how amore. He has dashed on as if he were riding vassed, his theories may be opposed, his ang he tears up the sand. He follows he follows. over the Pampas, full of spirit and intelligence; ments may be resisted ; but, without rhyme How will Hamet escape? He has driven the and he has shewn a zealous regard for his subject, reason, to disbelieve his statements, is at a youth close to the barrier ; there is no escape, worthy of a brother traveller, whose own rough to sever the band which holds society together: no hope-be must fall !! . He falls not, he journeys have taught him the difference be it destroys the allegiance which a well-dispuses falls not !' exclaimed Cassim. O noble Ha-tween an experienced observer and a fire-side individual would willingly feel that he owe met!' At this instant a loud, continued, and critic. Perhaps he displays more acerbity than public opinion; it tells him that his only és deafening 'shout of applause shook the arena; is required upon Lord 'Valentia's and Mr. fensive weapon is contempt. "Sir, you are >> for Hamet, bold, active, quick of eye and Salt's dissonances from Bruce; but it must also gentleman l'exclaimed a passionate, irratiam vigorous of limb, with one bound, at the very be confessed, that he frequently demonstrates man.—Sir, you are no judge!" was the cain. instant the bull was about to toss him on his them to be mere cavils or mistakes. Ours, contemptuous reply." horns, sprang on the animal's back, and leapt however, is not the office to reconcile contro The following anecdotes and remarks, too unde over him. He ran forward. Nero had al. versies; and we shall be content to quote a few the close of Bruce's life, interest us much. ready received more than one stab from the passages as specimens of the style and feeling of “After the publication of his travels, Best knife. None of them, however, reached any the “Life."

occupied himself in the management of mortal part ; still he bled fast, and there was “ When Bruce's work was completed, just estate, and of his extensive coaleries Ele hope, could Hamet but keep him at bay till the before it was printed, and while public atten- visited London occasionally, and kept up creature was somewhat spent by loss of blood, tion was eagerly expecting it, Johnson trans- correspondence with Daines Barrington sa he might even yet despatch him. So great lated and published the travels in Abyssinia of with Buffon. He also employed his time was the interest excited in the breasts of the the Jesuit Jereme Lobo. In the Gentleman's Biblical literature, and even projected an editis spectators, that many called out to him to make Magazine for 1789, it is stated that Johnson of the Bible, with notes, pointing out number for the extremity of the arena, under the king's had declared to Sir John Hawkins, that when less instances in which the Jewish history a pavilion, as being farthest removed from his he first conversed with Mr. Bruce the Abys- singularly confirmed by his own observates. enemy.

sinian traveller, he was very much inclined to He took a deep interest in the French enb “ ''he bull had, indeed, turned again to the believe that he had been there; but that he had tion. He had received much personal Link pursuit; and that with so much fierceness, afterwards altered his opinion !' In Johnson's ness from Louis XVI., and when intelligen

Ready to proel, te groei, topeny, to light, readers who love mirch, tu luy Handsome mes : the Pop-father" admirable, and
Thank Harvey, et te
the lab Jual he te
Annual

illustrates a capital son the others will speak Traum Wow, and to deal w nghe We have given three of the cuts a specs. for themselves to our belyday readers bom, ther, roll me your monthly parte,

And the sily red,

The me the permet Larm of lite beste te pare te arte may pot

fi in the Puh. Any tulong na

Na telo y pethenalpark
But all, with a pear to me,
Withingy kad dabar

(hur author should surely be made laureato to the Society, and sing in a cage as a Hooded

But we are getting out of bounds, and must' prune aur wings." Domestic Asades" is. best piece of purtat ; "the susp.lather," and has contrast at page 12, two excellent lettle | mam ; and Sly Ron and Her," could be written by noted, but our suthur. " The Supper Nuperution" Judlows:

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the combat. He was black in colour ; and the last efforts of his rage, that the sight of it preface, accordingly, he, evidently at the ex. therefore had he been named Nero. Whilst impressed horror. His blood streamed from his pense of Bruce's reputation, extols the Portu. thus he stood, wild cries arose from the circus. flanks; he bounded, rather than ran, forward guese traveller, as one who has amused his They were strange and mingled ; some seemed with dreadful bellowings. He shook his neck reader with no romantic absurdities or incredi. uttered in joy that the animal shewed little and sides, tossed the sand in his career, whilst ble fictions. He appears by his modest and 10symptoms of being willing for the attack. The volumes of smoke arose from his mouth and affected narrative to have described things as more brutal Portuguese, however,—those true nostrils. Hamet; as a final effort, determined he saw them, to have copied nature from the lovers of the game, who could forget even hu- to spring upon him; and, for that purpose, life, and to have consulted his senses, Dot bis manity in their sports,-greeted the creature when within a few yards of the bull, turned to imagination. He meets with no basilisks that with yells, hoots, and hissings; since it was confront him. His foot slipped-he fell and destroy with their eyes, his crocodiles derenr always deemed an infallible mark of cowardice the knife dropped from his hand. All hope their prey without tears, and his cataracts fall in the bull if he did not instantly attack his fed ; for at this instant he stood close to the from the rock without deafening the neighbourfoe. Hamet was ready to receive him; his barrier, which cut off all retreat, and the wilding inhabitants.' These round, rigmarole senwood-knife in his hand-his eye fixed on his bull was making towards him, with head bent, tences were rolled against Bruce, a man who enemy. His fine person drawn to its utmost to gore him to death with his horns. A cry of had patiently visited three-quarters of the height, every muscle in his slender limbs horror arose from the arena. Hamet sprang globe, by Johnson, one of the most prejudiced seemed to swell and to shew its power, as he up. There was no escape. Ines de Castro men of his age, who, himself a traveller, had stood, like a greyhound on the slip,' eager for sat immediately above the very spot where the not temper enough to travel in a hack-chaise the hardy encounter."

youthful Moor was in so much danger. Quick to Aberdeen! Peter Pindar amused all people Dogs are sent in, when “the bull, that had in feeling and in thought, she tore from her (except Bruce) by his satirical Alings, one é heen thus irritated by having the dogs turned shoulders the crimson mantle in which she was which was out upon him,-a usual practice, whenever the wrapt, and threw it into the arena with so true • Nor have I been where men, (what loss, alas !! animal shewed any delay in the attack,- now a hand, that Hamet caught it-cast it over the

Kill half a cow, and turn the rest to grass.'* sufficiently convinced all the spectators that bull's head as he prepared to gore him—and Bruce met these and other similar assaults ia such delay was not from want of spirit. With ere the beast could disentangle himself from a manly way; in the way that all writers, con an aspect full of savage fury, he lashed his the blind thus thrown over him, Hamet re- scious of truth and integrity, ought to meet the sides with his broad tail, bellowed, tore up the covered his knife, that lay close at his feet, and misrepresentations or calumnies of the envious ground with hoof and horns, and darted for- struck it into the spine. His mighty enemy and malicious." He concludes his preface with ward towards Hamet. The youth, by leaping fell, a convulsed corpse."

the following noble and remarkable words:with an agility alone to be compared to the There are some very beautiful descriptions I have only to add, that were it probable, as nimble-footed chamois as it springs from rock of Portuguese scenery: Mrs. Bray sees with in my decayed state of health it is not, that I to rock, endeavoured, but in vain, to avoid the the eye of a painter; and one great merit, should live to see a second edition of this work, continued pursuit of the bull, -his eye ever that of historical accuracy as regards man. all well-founded, judicious remarks suggested, watchful for the moment of attack. No such ners, costume, &c., her pages invariably possess. should be gratefully and carefully attended to : moment occurred; and it seemed evident that These volumes must add, therefore, to her but I do solemnly declare to the public in gehis life would terminate with the time in which already high popularity.

neral, that I never will refute or answer any he should become spent and breathless, from

cavils, captious or idle objections, such as every the violent exertions he made to preserve it. The Life of Bruce, the Abyssinian Traveller. new publication seems unavoidably to give birth Hassan saw this. He clasped his hands to By Major T. B. Head. (Family Library, to, nor ever reply to those witticisms and criti. gether in agony-he looked up to heaven—he XVII.) 12mo. pp. 535. London, 1830. cisms that appear in newspapers and periodical uttered fearful cries, that mingled even with

J. Murray.

writings. What I have written I have written. his prayers. He will die! he will die !' ex. A fortnight ago, on the issue of this new My readers have before them, in the present claimed Hassan. O for an angel's wing to volume of the Family Library, we briefly cha- volumes, all that I shall ever say, directly or waft him hence in safety! Mortal aid is there racterised it as most deserving of the atten- indirectly, upon the subject; and I do, without none to save him. But see, prophet of Mecca! tion of all classes of readers, whether for one moment's anxiety, trust my defence to an what a daring act! He has seized the terrible amusement or instruction ; and return to it impartial, well - informed, and judicious pube animal by the horns ; he suffers himself to be now, not to alter, but to repeat and enforce our lic.'” dragged round the arena. Now he hangs by verdict. To compress the marrow of Bruce's Upon these matters Major Head sayz wellone hand: he stabs him in the throat; the tive volumes into one good thickset little book “There is surely nothing which, in the blood spouts like a fount of waters--but the of 535 pages, with an excellent portrait, wood- opinion of liberal men, can more degrade a brute still lives. Look ! Hamet falls from his cuts, and maps, for five shillings, is very like country-nothing which, at the great table of hold-God save thee! He is up again! he is getting the Iliad into the nutshell, and very the world, more deservedly places it below the on his feet! O, Allah, how I thank thee : deserving of public reward.

salt_than its unreasonably disbelieving an boHe flies! he flies !--but look! the brute is Major Head, too, has performed his task con nourable man. A man's opinions may be can. mad with fury-gored with wounds. See how amore. He has dashed on as if he were riding vassed, his theories may be opposed, his argu. he tears up the sand. He follows-he follows. over the Pampas, full of spirit and intelligence; ments may be resisted ; but, without rhyme x How will Hamet escape? He has driven the and he has shewn a zealous regard for his subject, reason, to disbelieve his statements, is at onæ youth close to the barrier ; there is no escape, worthy of a brother traveller, whose own rough to sever the band which holds society together; no hope-he must fall !' He falls not, he journeys have taught him the difference be. it destroys the allegiance which a well-dispared falls not!' exclaimed Cassim. O noble Ha- tween an experienced observer and a fire-side individual would willingly feel that he owes to met! At this instant a loud, continued, and critic. Perhaps he displays more acerbity than public opinion; it tells him that his only dedeafening 'shout of applause shook the arena; is required upon Lord 'Valentia’s and Mr. fensive weapon is contempt. "Sir, you are 1 for Hamet, bold, active, quick of eye and Salt's dissonances from Bruce; but it must also gentleman ! exclaimed a passionate, irrational vigorous of limb, with one bound, at the very be confessed, that he frequently demonstrates man.-- Sir, you are no judge!' was the calin, instant the bull was about to toss him on his them to be mere cavils or mistakes. Ours, contemptuous reply.". horns, sprang on the animal's back, and leapt however, is not the office to reconcile contro The following anecdotes and remarks, towards over him. He ran forward. Nero had al. versies; and we shall be content to quote a few the close of Bruce's life, interest us much. ready received more than one stab from the passages as specimens of the style and feeling of " After the publication of his travels, Bruce knife. None of them, however, reached any the “Life."

occupied himself in the management of his mortal part ; still he bled fast, and there was “ When Bruce's work was completed, just estate, and of his extensive coaleries. He hope, could Hamet but keep him at bay till the before it was printed, and while public atten- visited London occasionally, and kept up : creature was somewhat spent by loss of blood, tion was eagerly expecting it, Johnson trans- correspondence with Daines Barrington and he might even yet despatch him. So great lated and published the travels in Abyssinia of with Buffon. He also employed his time in was the interest excited in the breasts of the the Jesuit Jereme Lobo. In the Gentleman's Biblical literature, and even projected an edities spectators, that many called out to him to make Magazine for 1789, it is stated that Johnson of the Bible, with notes, pointing out number. for the extremity of the arena, under the king's had declared to Sir John Hawkins, that when less instances in which the Jewish history v pavilion, as being farthest removed from his he first conversed with Mr. Bruce the Abys- singularly confirmed by his own observations enemy.

sinian traveller, he was very much inclined to He took a deep interest in the French refols. “ T'he bull had, indeed, turned again to the believe that he had been there; but that he had tion. He had received much personal kind. pursuit; and that with so much fierceness, afterwards altered his opinion !' In Johnson's/ness from Louis XVI., and when intelligent

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Ready to prowl, to growl, to prey, to fight, | readers who love mirth, to buy Hood's Comic mens: the “Step-father” is admirable, and
Thanks be to Harvey, who their portraits drew;
Annual.

illustrates a capital story: the others will speak
And to the cutters praise is justly due;
To Branston always, and to always Wright.

We have given three of the cuts as speci- for themselves to our holyday readers. Go on, then, publishing your monthly parts,

And let the wealthy crowd,

The noble and the proud,
Learn of brute beasts to patronise the arts.

So may your household flourish in the Park,
And no long boa go to his long home,

No antelope give up the vital spark;
But all, with this your scientific tome,

Go on as swimmingly as old Noah's ark!"
Our author should surely be made laureate
to the Society, and sing in a cage as a Hood-ed
crow.

But we are getting out of bounds, and must prune our wings. * Domestic Asides” is a neat piece of point ; “the Step-father,” and his contrast at page 123, two excellent little essays; and “ My Son and Heir,” could be written by nobody but our author. “ The Supper Superstition” follows:

“ 'Twas twelve o'clock by Chelsea chimes,

When all in hungry trim,
Good Mister Jupp sat down to sup,

With wife, and Kate, and Jim.
Said he, upon this dainty cod

How bravely I shall sup-
When, whiter than the table-cloth,

A ghost came rising up!
• O, father dear, O, mother dear,

Dear Kate, and brother Jim-
You know when some one went to sea-

Don't cry—but I am him!
You hope some day with fond embrace
To greet your absent Jack;

A STEP-FATHER.
But, oh, I am come here to say

I'm never coming back!
From Alexandria we set sail,

With corn, and oil, and figs;
But steering too much Sow', we struck

Upon the Sow and Pigs !
The ship we pump'd till we could see

Old England from the tops ;
When down she went with

all our hands,
Right in the Channel's chops!
Just give a look in Norey's chart,

The very place it tells;
I think it says twelve fathom deep,

Clay bottom, mix'd with shells.
Well, there we are till hands aloft,"

We have at last a call;
The pug I had for brother Jim,

Kate's parrot too, and all.
But, oh! my spirit cannot rest

In Davy Jones's sod,
'Till I've appeared to you and said,
Don't sup on that 'ere cod!
You live on land, and little think

What passes in the sea;
Last Sunday week, at 2 P. M.,

That cod was picking me!
Those oysters, too, that look so plump,

And seem so nicely done,
They put my corpse in many shells,

Instead of only one.
0, do not eat those oysters then,

GETTING A HOLE HOLY DAY.
And do not touch the shrimps;
When I was in my briny grave,

They suck'd my blood like imps !
Don't eat what brutes would never eat,

The brutes I used to pat;
They'll know the smell they used to smell-

Just try the dog and cat!
The spirit fled—they wept his fate,

And cried, alack, alack !
At last, up started brother Jim-

Let's try if Jack was Jack !
They called the dog, they called the cat,

And little kitten too;
And down they put the cod and sauce,

To see what brutes would do.
Old Tray licked all the oysters up,

Puss never stood at crimps,
But munch'd the cod, and little Kit

Quite feasted on the shrimps !
The thing was odd, and minus cod

And sauce, they stood like posts :
O, prudent folks, for fear of hoax,

Put no belief in ghosts!"
" The Scrape Book of an Unlucky Man" is
very ludicrous; but the volume is, from be-
ginning to end, so full of amusement, that
there would be no end to our Review, were
we to attempt to be particular. Particular
therefore we are not: we only tell all our

6 WELL! I NEVER COULD KEEP MY LEGS!"

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