The Library of Wit and Humor, Prose and Poetry: Selected from the Literature of All Times and Nations, Volumen 4

Portada
Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Rufus Edmonds Shapley
Gebbie Publishing Company, Limited, 1894

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 339 - Hahnsum kerridge' they called it then. Eighteen hundred and twenty came ; Running as usual ; much the same. Thirty and forty at last arrive, And then come fifty, and FIFTY-FIVE. Little of all we value here Wakes on the morn of its hundredth year Without both feeling and looking queer, In fact, there's nothing that keeps its youth, So far as I know, but a tree and truth.
Página 295 - John, he cried, But John he cried in vain ; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein.
Página 297 - And thus unto the youth she said That drove them to the Bell, "This shall be yours when you bring back My husband safe and well." The youth did ride, and soon did meet John coming back amain, Whom in a trice he tried to stop By catching at his rein. • But not performing what he meant, And gladly would have done, The frighted steed he frighted more, And made him faster run. Away went Gilpin, and away Went post-boy at his heels, The post-boy's horse right glad to miss The lumbering of the wheels.
Página 338 - He would build one shay to beat the taown 'n' the keounty 'n' all the kentry raoun' ; It should be so built that it couldn' break daown . — " Fur," said the Deacon, " 't's mighty plain Thut the weakes' place mus' stan the strain ; 'n' the way t' fix it, uz I maintain, Is only jest T" make that place uz strong uz the rest.
Página 295 - Now Mistress Gilpin (careful soul) Had two stone bottles found, To hold the liquor that she loved, And keep it safe and sound. Each bottle had a curling ear, Through which the belt he drew, And hung a bottle on each side, To make his balance true. Then over all, that he might be Equipp'd from top to toe, His long red cloak, well brush'd and neat, He manfully did throw.
Página 294 - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A trainband captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair.
Página 338 - That couldn't be split nor bent nor broke, — That was for spokes and floor and sills; He sent for lancewood to make the thills, The cross-bars were ash, from the straightest trees, The panels of white-wood, that cuts like cheese, But lasts like iron for things like these; The hubs of logs from the "Settler's ellum...
Página 338 - ... em, Never an axe had seen their chips, And the wedges flew from between their lips, Their blunt ends frizzled like celery-tips; Step and prop-iron, bolt and screw, Spring, tire, axle, and linchpin too, Steel of the finest, bright and blue; Thoroughbrace bison-skin, thick and wide; Boot, top, dasher, from tough old hide Found in the pit when the tanner died. That was the way he 'put her through.
Página 339 - And the back-crossbar as strong as the fore, And spring and axle and hub encore. And yet, as a whole, it is past a doubt In another hour it will be worn out ! First of November, 'Fifty-five ! This morning the parson takes a drive.
Página 296 - Until he came unto the Wash Of Edmonton so gay; And there he threw the Wash about On both sides of the way, Just like unto a trundling mop, Or a wild goose at play. At Edmonton his loving wife From the balcony spied Her tender husband, wondering much To see how he did ride. "Stop, stop, John Gilpin!— Here's the house !" They all at once did cry; "The dinner waits, and we are tired;"— Said Gilpin, "So am I!

Información bibliográfica