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These gifts were charm'd by secret spell

Thy truth in absence to divine; And they have done their duty well,

Alas! they could not teach thee thine.

That chain was firm in every link,

But not to bear a stranger's touch; That lute was sweet—till thou could’st think

In other hands its notes were such.

Let him, who from thy neck unbound

The chain which shiver'd in his grasp, Who saw that lute refuse to sound,

Restring the chords, renew the clasp.

When thou wert changed, they alter'd too;

The chain is broke, the music mute: 'Tis past-to them and thee adieu

False heart, frail chain, and silent lute.

SONNET.

TO GENEVRA,

Thine eyes blue tenderness, thy long fair hair,

And the wan lustre of thy features—caught

From contemplation—where serenely wrought, Seems Sorrow's softness charm’d from its despair — Have thrown such speaking sadness in thine air,

That—but I know thy blessed bosom fraught

With mines of unalloy'd and stainless thoughtI should have deem'd thee doom'd to earthly care. With such an aspect, by his colours blent,

When from his beauty-breathing pencil born, (Except that thou hast nothing to repent)

The Magdalen of Guido saw the mornSuch seem'st thoubut how much more excellent !

With nought Remorse can claim-nor Virtue scorn.

SONNET.

TO GENE V R.A.

Tuy cheek is pale with thought, but not from woe,

And yet so lovely, that if Mirth could flush

Its rose of whiteness with the brightest blush, My heart would wish away that ruder glow :And dazzle not thy deep-blue eyes—but oh!

While gazing on them sterner eyes will gush,

And into mine my mother's weakness rush, Soft as the last drops round heaven's airy bow. For, through thy long dark lashes low depending,

The soul of melancholy Gentleness
Gleams like a seraph from the sky descending,

Above all pain, yet pitying all distress;
At once such majesty with sweetness blending,

I worship more, but cannot love thee less.

INSCRIPTION

ON THE MONUMENT OF A NEWFOUNDLAND DOG.

When somé proud son of man returns to earth,
Unknown to glory, but upheld by birth,
The sculptor's art exhausts the pomp of woe,
And storied urns record who rests below;
When all is done, upon the tomb is seen,
Not what he was, but what he should have been :
But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend,
The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
Whose honest heart is still his master's own,
Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone,
Unhonour'd falls, unnoticed all his worth,
Denied in heaven the soul he held on earth :
While man, vain insect! hopes to be forgiven,
And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven,
Oh man! thou feeble tenant of an hour,
Debased by slavery, or corrupt by power,
Who knows thee well must quit thee with disgust,
Degraded mass of animated dust!
Thy love is lust, thy friendship all a cheat,
Thy smiles hypocrisy, thy words deceit!

By nature vile, ennobled but by name,
Each kindred brute might bid thee blush for shame.
Ye! who perchance behold this simple urn,
Pass on—it honours none you wish to mourn:
To mark a friend's remains these stones arise,
I never knew but one, and here he lies.

Newstead Albey, Oct. 30, 1808.

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