History of His Own Time: With the Suppressed Passages of the First Volume and Notes by the Earls of Dartmouth and Hardwicke and Speaker Onslow, Hitherto Unpublished. To which are Added the Cursory Remarks of Swift, and Other Observations, Volumen 4

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Clarendon Press, 1823
 

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Página 548 - ... sound judgment, than in imagination, or invention : his designs were always great and good ; but it was thought he trusted too much to that, and that he did not descend enough to the humours of his people to make himself, and his notions, more acceptable to them : this, in a government that has so much of freedom in it as ours, was more necessary than he was inclined to believe : his reservedness grew on him, so that it disgusted...
Página 549 - This, in a government that has so much of freedom in it as ours, was more necessary than he was inclined to believe. His reservedness grew on him ; so that it disgusted most of those who served him. But he had observed the errors of too much talking more than those of too cold a silence.
Página 74 - The Speaker of the House of Commons, Sir John Trevor, was a bold and dexterous man, and knew the most effectual ways of recommending himself to every government; he had been in great favour in King James's time, and was made Master of the Rolls by him, and if Lord...
Página 551 - ... him ill. He loved the Dutch, and was much beloved among them ; but the ill returns he met from the English nation, their jealousies of him, and their perverseness towards him, had too much soured his mind, and had in a great measure alienated him from them, which he did not take care enough to conceal, though he saw the ill effects this had on his business.
Página 553 - After all the abatements that may be allowed for his errors and faults, he ought still to be reckoned among the greatest princes that our history, or indeed that any other, can afford. He died in a critical time for his own glory ; since he had formed a great alliance, and had projected the whole scheme of the war ; so that if it succeeds, a great part of the honour of it will be ascribed to him ; and if otherwise, it will be said he was the soul of the alliance, that did both animate and knit it...
Página 74 - ... he now got himself to be chosen speaker, and was made first commissioner of the great seal : being a tory in principle, he undertook to manage that party, provided he was furnished with such sums of money as might purchase some votes...
Página 149 - III. c. 23, enacted at the earnest recommendation of the king himself from the throne, the judges are continued in their offices during their good behaviour, notwithstanding any demise of the crown, which was formerly held immediately to vacate their seats, and their full salaries are absolutely secured to them during the continuance of their commissions...
Página 236 - ... he was not only the best preacher of the age, but seemed to have brought preaching to perfection; his sermons were so well heard and liked, and so much read, that all the nation proposed him as a pattern, and studied to copy after him...
Página 149 - III. c. 2. that their commissions shall be made, not as formerly, durante bene placito, but quamdiu bene se gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established; but that it may be lawful to remove them on the address of both houses of parliament.
Página 397 - ... he is a man of a very hot temper, soon inflamed, and very brutal in his passion ; he raises his natural heat by drinking much brandy, which he rectifies himself with great application ; he is subject to convulsive motions all over his body, and his head seems to be affected with these ; he wants not capacity...

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