Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, Volumen 53

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Royal Agricultural Society of England, 1892
Vols. for 1933- include the societys Farmers' guide to agricultural research.
 

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Índice

Quarterly Report of the Honorary Consulting Entomologist March
132
The Worlds Production and Consumption of Food
137
CattleWeighing Statistics By ALBERT PELL
144
Agriculture in South Australia By C G ROBERTS
156
Glasshouses By S B L DRUCE
166
TrapPlants for Eelworms By W FREAM LL D
173
Woods and Plantations in Great Britain
183
Statistics affecting British Agricultural Interests
194
List of Council of Royal Agricultural Society of England
139
List of Honorary Members of the Society
147
The Price of Grain in 1891
155
Table showing number of Governors and Members in each year
156
XXXV
171
132
175
List of Judges for the Warwick Meeting 1892 xlvi
183
xlviii
184
Statistics affecting British Agricultnral Interests
190
Vermin of the Farm With Five Illustrations
203
Proceedings of the Council April 6 1892
204
Vermin of the Farm With Fire Illustrations PAGE
205
The Evolution of Agricultural Implements
238
Desirable Agricultural Experiments
258
Contagious Footrot in Sheep With Eight Illustrations
276
Variations of the Fourcourse System
291
Balance Sheet for 1891 with Statements of Receipts
294
The Trials of Ploughs at Warwick
306
By WILLIAM E BEAR
314
Wild Birds in Relation to Agriculture
325
Report of the Council to the Anniversary General Meeting of Governors
339
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee June 1892
347
Report of the Education Committee on the Results of the Senior
353
Report of Rotation of Districts Committee With a Map
363
Technical Training of Stockmen By ALFRED J SMITH
372
The Cure of SheepScab By the EDITOR
380
The Cure of SheepScab By The EDITOR 480
383
Allotments and Small Holdings
439
Vermin of the Farm II With Three Illustrations
463
The Warwick Meeting 1892 With a Plan
479
APPENDIX
484
Miscellaneous Implements exhibited at Warwick
523
The Farm Prize Competition of 1892 With Three Plans
552
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee July 1892
585
New Modes of Disposing of Fruit and Vegetables Illus
589
CastorOil Seed in Cattle Foods
597
Castoroil Seed in Cattle Foods By J W LEATHER Ph D
625
lxxxiii
630
Proceedings of the Council June 22 1892
630
Principal Additions to the Library during 1891 xlviii
630
Report of the Council to the HalfYearly General Meeting of Governors
630
613
630
Proceedings of the Council April 6 1892 liii
630
Wild Birds in Relation to Agriculture
658
Official Reports
744
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee December 1892
752
Quarterly Report of the Chemical Committee June 1892
755
Report on Experiments on Prevention and Cure of Potato Disease
761
The Woburn Experiments on Prevention and Cure of Potato
771
The Fermentations of Milk Illustrated By J M H MUNRO D Sc
796
The Growth of Veterinary Pathology
808
The Decline of Wheatgrowing in England By W FREAM LL D 8114
819
Recent Agricultural Publications Illustrated
826
Report of Rotation of Districts Committee With a Map
839
The Microorganisms of the Soil 813
843
Dishorned Cattle By ALBERT PelL
851
Statistics affecting British Agricultural Interests 861V
861
Technical Training of Stockmen ALFRED J SMITH 372
862
Proceedings of the Council June 22 1892
clxiii
Proceedings of the Council November 2 1892 clxiii
clxxviii
List of Council of Royal Agricultural Society of England
cxciii
Cottage Sanitation With Fourteen Illustrations

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