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A new coat of mail, and elegant decorations. Symes, in his embassy to Ava, states that the inhabitants of the Andaman Islands, being much incommoded by insects, their first occupation in the morning, is to plaster their bodies all over with mud, which, hardening in the sun, forms an impenetrable armour. They then, by way of embellishment, paint their woolly heads with red ochre. When thus completely equipped, there is not, he says, a more hideous appearance to be found in human form.

Philadelphia Statistics. BAPTISMS AND BURIALS IN THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA

FROM DEC. 25, 1808, TILL DEC. 25, 1809. Collected by the clerks and sextons of Christ-church, St. Peter's,

and St. James. BAPTISMS.

BURIALS. PROTESTANT EPISCOPALIANS. PROTESTANT EPISCOPALIANS. Christ-church, St. Peter, and Christ-church, St. Peter, and

St. James - - - - - 205 St. James - - - - - 135 St. Paul's - - - - - - - 115 || St. Paul's - - - - - - - 50 PRESBYTERIANS.

PRESBYTERIANS. First congregation - - - 45 | First congregation - - - - 40 Second - - - - - - - 49 Second - - - - - - Third - - - - - - - 50 || Third - - - - - - Fourth - - - - - - - 63 Fourth - - - - - - Scotch - - - - - - 14 Scotch - - - - - - GERMAN LUTHERANS.

GERMAN LUTHERANS. Zion Church - - - - - 527 Zion Church - - - - - . 156 St. John's - - - - - - 147 St. John's - - - - - - 34 German Reformed - - - 204 | German Reformed - - - 85 ROMAN CATHOLICS.

ROMAN CATHOLICS. St. Mary's - - - - - - 278 | St Mary's - - - - - Holy Trinity - - ... - - 203 Holy Trinity - - - - - 89 St. Augustine's - - - - - 85 St. Augustine's - - - - - 26 METHODISTS.

METHODISTS. St. George - - - - - - 22 | St. George - - - - - - 24 Union - (no return) · - Union - - - - - - - - 14

First Baptist . . - - - 51 | Friends - - - - - - - 113 Swedes - - - - - - - 83|| Free Quakers - - - - - 35 Hebrews - - - - - - 2 Baptists - - - - - - - 43 Moravians - - - - - - 12 | Swedes - - - - - - - 80 Universalists - - - - - Universalists - - - - - - 6 AFRICANS.

Hebrews - - - - - - - 3 Episcopal Church - - - 56 || Moravians - - - - - - S Methodist do. - - - - - 82

AFRICANS. l Episcopal Church - - - - 27 2293 Methodist do. . - - - - 27

| Public burying ground - - 627

1936

Baptisms more this year than the last - 20
Burials less this year than the last - - 233

LETTER FROM SIR BENJAMIN WEST. MR. OLDSCHOOL, # The following is an extract of a letter from Sir Benjamin West on a subject interesting to the cause of science and humanity. It earnestly invites exertions on the part of those who delight to encourage the advancement of the arts, and the improvement of genius.

Newman-Street, Nov. 30, 1809. “ Philadelphia I cannot name without being interested in all, that has a connexion with that city: this, my good sir, alludes to a young gentleman now studying painting under my directions as a professor of that art, whose talents only want time to mature them to excellence; and I am apprehensive that his means of support are too slender to admit his stay at this seat of arts that length of time to effect what I could wish, as I understand it cannot be longer that the beginning of next summer. Could his friends unite in a way that would afford him the means of studying here another season, he would then secure the knowledge of his profession on that permanent basis, on which he would be able to build his future greatness in America-to his honour and the honour of the country.

“ The young gentleman I alluded to is Mr. Sully. I find him every way worthy and promising. I could not refrain from thus giving you my sentiments when the success of Mr. Sully in his profession as a painter, is so much to be desired.

I have the honor to be,
My dear sır,
Your much obliged,

BENJAMIN WEST."

ORIGINAL POETRY-FOR THE PORT FOLIO.

THE RECLUSE,

How sweetly glide the days of him who feels
The raptures soft that mutual love bestows!
For him each month is May; and every sun,
With smiling welcome, bids him rise
To brush the dews of morn, and heedless stray

Through tangled dells, or near the babbling brook,
Vol. III.

Tt

Tha: wildly wanders through the darkening trees.
There too, when Evening steals with silent tread,
When all is hushed the busy hum of men,
And nought disturbs the tranquil scene, save when
The distant watch-dog's faithful bark is heard
With Love's light footsteps he repairs to meet
The modest maid whose virtues won his heart,

But not to me the sun, that smiles on all
Ils kindly influence lends. No genial rays
Peep through my lattice windows to dispel
Such airy visions as oft flit around
The lover's pillow, who, to Fancy's freaks resigned,
Sees nought but halcyon days of bliss prepared
To crown the choice his youthful hopes have made.
To me no month is blooming May, but all
Is dark December's sullen, saddening gloom.
And me no morn of teeming Spring invites
With fragrant breath of violets, blushing rose,
And purple buds that scent the wanton breeze.

But faded verdure strews my lonely walk, And bids me think of my own luckless fate. When howling storms assail my humble cot Despair assumes her reign, and my sad soul Shrinks from the sickening view of scenes so drear To seek relief in Sleep's oblivious aid. But fairy visionş visit not my couch, No smiling promises of future joys Salute my ear. I see no gentle hand Outstretched to sooth the cares that fire my brain. All, all is dark and comfortless: or if Perchance a wandering dream should come, it speaks Of black Despair, and all the ills that wait On life, when cheated of its earliest hopes!

SEDLEY.

THE NAUTILUS AND THE OYSTER; A FABLE,

ADDRESSED TO A SISTER.

Who that has on the salt sea been
The Nautilus has never seen

In gallant sailing trim,
His filmy fore-and-aft sail spread,
And o'er the billows shoot ahead

Impell’d by winds abeam?
The little bark's air-freighted hull,
Keen prow and bends amidship, full,

Display the mermaid's pow'rs;
For paint, the Sylphs their brushes steep
In rainbows glowing on the deep

Athwart retiring show'rs.
So pretty, and not vain, would be
More strange than strangest things we see:

Near Ceylon's spicy coast
As once the tiny wand'rer steer'd
His halcyon course, he thus was heard

To make his foolish boast.

• What tenant of the sea or air
Can with the Nautilus compare,

In colours gay attir’d?
I've seen, nor visited in vain,
Most countries bord’ring on the main

And been in all admir'd.

Secure I brave the polar gale,
Beneath the line I trim my sail,

In either tropic found;
Where'er a ship may go I go,
Nor fear like her a treacherous foe

The rock, the hidden ground.
The distant canvass I descry
Of commerce hanging in the sky

That bounds th' Atlantic wave.

I share, with hostile fleets who ride
Victorious on the subject tide,

The empire ocean gave.
Alas! how different is the lot
Of that poor Oyster thus forgot;

Unpitied and unknown:
Is it by chance or adverse fate,
Or cruel Nature's stepdame hate

He's here condemn'd to groan ?

The splendors of the orb of day Scarce visit with a twilight ray

The bed where low he lies, And whence he never can remove: To gayer scenes forbid to rove,

E’en here he lives and dies!

My claims, may well his envy raise
Establish'd on the gen'ral praise

Bestow'd where e'er I go.”
He ceas'd-when, lo! amaz'd to hear,
This gentle answer to his ear

Came bub'ling from below!

“ Your pity spare, my gaudy friend,
Your eloquence I might commend

Had truth conviction lent :
I neither fate nor nature blame,
An Oyster's looks produce no shame,

He lives upon content.

The pow'r to go where one may choose,
So much esteem’d, I would refuse :

No wish have I to rove.
And brilliant hues and glossy side
Serve but to nourish silly pride;

Yourself this truth will prove.

How falsely do they judge, who take
A fair exterior when they make

Their estimate of good.

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