Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece: During the Middle of the Fourth Century Before the Christian Aera. Tr. from the French. In Seven Volumes and an Eighth in Quarto, Containing Maps, Plan [etc.], Volumen 6

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G. G. J. & J. Robinson, 1791

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Página 4 - ... that had preceded, accompanied/ and followed the victory of Apollo over Python. ' Some years after this regulation, Sufarion and Thefpis, both born in a fmall borough of Attica, named Icaria, appeared each at the head of a company of actors, the one on a kind of ftage, the other in a cart.
Página 3 - But as the Charm of his works depends in a great meafure on. the- paffions and motion .with which he knew to animate them, the poets who came after him endeavoured to introduce into theirs an action which might excite emotion or mirth in the fpectators...
Página 31 - ... painted men greater than they can be, Sophocles as they ought to be, and Euripides as they are. By forcibly insisting on the important doctrines of morality, the latter was placed among the number of the sages, and will for ever be regarded as the philosopher of the stage."* Modern writers may well be astonished at the great fertility of these ancient dramatists, especially...
Página 21 - Here lies jEfchylus, the fon of Euphorion, born in Attica. He died in the fertile country of Gela. The Perfians and the woods of Marathon will for ever atteft his valour.
Página 4 - ... of intoxication. In the festivals of Bacchus hymns were sung which were the offspring of the true or feigned ecstasies of a poetical delirium. These hymns while they described the fabulous conquests of Bacchus, gradually became imitative — and, in the contests of the Pythian games, the players on the flute who entered into competition, were enjoined by an express law to represent successively the circumstances which preceded, accompanied and followed the victory of Apollo over Typhon...
Página 6 - Bacchusy; but the greater number thronged with ftill more eagernefs after the new pieces. Phrynichus, the difciple of Thefpis, made choice of that kind of verfe which is moft fuitable to the drama, was the author of fome other changes...
Página 8 - Niobe after the destruction of her children, appear on the stage, and remain during several scenes motionless, their heads covered with a veil and without uttering a word ; but if their eyes had overflown with tears, and they had poured forth the bitterest lamentations, could they have produced an effect so terrible...
Página 434 - ... that, without a guide, they would be in danger of lofing their way. It was this danger, no doubt, which introduced a new term into the Greek language. The word labyrinth, taken in the literal fenfe...
Página 89 - E sleeping in her arms. Here Ulysses and Diomede enter by night the Trojan camp, through which they quickly spread alarm, the sentinels running together from all sides, crying Stop ! stop ! kill ! kill ! There the Grecian soldiers, after the taking of Troy, appear on the roofs of the houses, and begin to reduce that celebrated city to ashes. At another time coffins are brought, containing the bodies of the...
Página 190 - Such is the influence of the climate of Ionia : and as moral caufes, far from correcting, have only tended to increafe it, vthe lonians are become the mod effeminate, but at the fame time are to be numbered among the mod amiable people of Greece.

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