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50. DIXIE.

(O.) I wish I was in de land ob cotton, Old times dar am not forgotten.

Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie Land! In Dixie Land whar I was born in, Early on one frosty mornin', Look away! Look away! Look away, Dixie Land, Den I wish I was in Dixie, hooray! Hooray! In Dixie Land I'll take my stand To lib and die in Dixie; Away, away, away down Sonih in Dixie, Away, away, away down South in Dixie.

51. ANNIE LAURIE.

(C)
Maxwelton's braes are bonnie,

Where early fa's the dew,
And it's there that Annie Laurie

Gave me her promise true.

Gave me her promise true,
Which ne'er forgot will be,
And for bonnie Annie Laurie
I'd lay me doon and dee.

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52." AULD LANG SYNE.

(F)
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days of auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne;
We'll tak’ a cup of kindness yeta

For auld lang syne.
We twa ha'e sported i’ the burn

Frae mornin' sun till dine,
But seas between us braid ha'e roared, ,

Sin' auld lang syne.
And here's a hand, my trusty frien',

And gie's a hand o' thine;
We'll tak’ a cup o' kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.

53. LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG.

(F)
Once in the dear dead days beyond recall,
When on the worlds the mists began to fall,
Out of the dreams that rose in happy throng,
Low to our hearts love sang an old, sweet song. .
And in the dusk; where fell the twilight's gleam,
Softly it wove itself into our dream.

Just a song at twilight, when the lights are low,
And the flick’ring shadows softly come and go.
Tho' the heart be weary, sad the day and long,
Still to us at twilight comes love's old sweet song,

Comes love's old sweet song.

54. CARRY ME BACK TO OLD VIRGINNY,

(A flat.) Carry me back to old Virginny, There's where the cotton and the corn and tatoes

grow, There's where the birds warble sweet in the spring.

time, There's where the old darkey's heart has long'd to

go. There's where I labored so hard for old Massa

Day after day in the fields of yellow corn. No place on earth do I love more sincerely Than old Virginny, the State where I was born. Carry me back to old Virginny, There's where the cotton and the corn and

tatoes grow. There's where the birds warble sweet in the

springtime, There's where the old darkey's heart has long'd

to go.

(Copyright, 1917, Oliver Ditson Co.)
55. SILVER THREADS AMONG THE GOLD.

(B flat.)
Darling, I am growing old ;
Silver threads among the gold
Shine upon my brow to-day,
Life is fading fast away ;
But my darling you will be, will be,
Always young and fair to me;
Yes, my darling, you will be
Always young and fair to me,

Darling, I am growing, growing old,
Silver threads among the gold.
Shine upon my brow to-day,
Life is fading fast away.

56. HOW CAN I LEAVE THEE.

(B flat.) How can I leave thee,

How can I from thee part?

Thou only hast my heart,
Dear one, believe.

Thou hast this soul of mine

So closely bound to thine,
No other can I love,
Save thee alone.

67. SWEET GENEVIEVE.

(F.)
O, Genevieve, I'd give the world

To live again the lovely past!
The rose of youth was dew im-pearled;

But now it withers in the blast.
I see thy face in every dream

My waking thoughts are full of thee;
Thy glance is in the starry beam
That falls along the summer sea.
O Genevieve, sweet Genevieve,

The days may come, the days may go,
But still the hands of mem'ry weave

The blissful dreams of long ago.
Fair Genevieve, my early love,

The years but make thee dearer far!
My heart shall never, never rove;

Thou art my only guiding star.
For me the past has no regret,

Whate'er the years may bring to me;
I bless the hour when first we met,

The hour that gave me love and thee! (Used by permission of William A. Pond & Co.)

58. SOLDIER'S FAREWELL.

(B flat.)
How can I bear to leave thee?
One parting kiss I give thee;
And then, whate'er befalls me,
I go where honor calls me,

Farewell, farewell, my own true love,
Farewell, farewell, my own true love,

59. NEARER, MY GOD, TO THEE.

(A flat.) Nearer, my God, to Thee, nearer to Thee; E'en tho' it be a cross that raiseth me. Still all my song shall be, nearer, my God, to Thee, Nearer, my God, to Thee, nearer to Thee.

Tho’ like a wanderer, the sun gone down,
Darkness be over me, my rest a stone;
Yet in my dreams I'd be nearer, my God, to Thee.
Nearer, my God, to Thee, nearer to Thee.

60. ABIDE WITH ME.

(E flat.)
Abide with me.; fast falls the eventide ;
The darkness deepens; Lord, with me abide.
When other helpers fail, and comforts flee,
Help of the helpless, oh, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;
Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.
Where is death's sting; where, grave, thy victory?
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

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