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March, march, march, march!

March, comrades, march along,
March, march, march, march,

March, a hundred million strong!
One in vision, one in will,
We shall carry Zion's hill,
God is in His heaven still :,
March, march, march !
Forward, comrades,
March, march, forever,
Up with the break of day,
Out on the trackless way,
Ours the heart to dare and do,
Ours the Promised Land to view,
Ours to build the world anew :

March, comrades, march! (Copyright, 1916, by G. Schirmer.)

11. OFF FOR FRANCE.

(G.) We're needed now in Europe, and we plan a little trip. We do not dare to give the date or mention name of

ship. We'll take a loaf of bread with us for rations while

we're gone, And Hoover will be pleased with us, because it's made

of corn. So we must go away, We're off for France to-day. We're off for France to take a chance for the U.S. A. We're going to take a little chance, We're going to France ! We're going to try a little run, To get our duty done, To have a little fun. We mean to clear it up, an' cheer it up, and then

come home.

We're going to take a little chance,
We're going to France!
We're going to try a little run,
To get our duty done,
To have a little fun.
We mean to clear it up, and cheer it up; and then

come home.

On our way across the ocean, if we chance on sub

marines, We'll take the opportunity to fill 'em up with beans, Or if we see a flier, we will catch it on the fly By putting salt upon its tail, as it goes flying by. So we must go away, We're off for France to-day. We're off for France to take a chance for the U. S. A, We're going to take a little chance, We're going to France ! We're going to try a little run, To get our duty done, To have a little fun, We mean to clear it up, an' cheer it up, and then

come home, (Copyright. 1917, by Daniel Gregory Mason; all rights reserved.)

12. JOAN OF ARC.

'Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc,
Do your eyes, from the skies, see the foe?

Don't you see the drooping Fleur-de-lis?

Can't you hear the tears of Normandy?
Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc,
Let your spirit guide us through,

Come lead your France to victory,

Joan of Arc, they are calling you. (Used by permission of Waterson, Berlin & Soyder.)

13. THE HOME ROAD.

(E flat.)
Sing a hymn of Freccion ;

Fling the banner high ;
Sing the Songs of Liberty-

Songs that shall not die.
For “the long, long road to Tipperary"
Is the road that leads me home

O'er hills and plains,

By lakes and lanes,
My Woodlands! Vy Cornfields !
My Country! My Home!

In the quiet hours

Of the starry night,
Dream the dreams of Far-away-

Home fires burning bright.
For “ the ong, long road to Tipperary”
Is the road that leads me home-

D'er hills and plains,

By lakes and lanes,
My Woodlands! My Cornfields !

My Country! My Home! (Copyright, 1917, by G. Schirmer.)

14. THERE'S A LONG, LONG TRAIL

(A flat.)

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Nights are growing very lonely,

Days are very long;
I'm a-growing weary only

List'ning for your song.
Old remembrances are thronging
į Through my memory,
Till it seems the world is full of dreams

Just to call you back to me.

There's a long, long trail a-winding

Into the land of my dreams,
Where the nightingales are singing

And the white moon beams:
There's a long, long night of waiting

Until my dreams all come true,
Till the day when I'll be going down

That long, long trail with you. (Used by permission of M. Witmark & Sons, publishers and owners of the copy. right.)

15. KEEP THE HOME FIRES BURNING.

(G.)
They were summoned from the hillside,

They were called in from the glen,
And the Country found them ready

At the stirring call for men.
Let no tears add to their hardship,

As the soldiers pass along,
And although your heart is breaking,
Make it sing this cheery song.

Keep the Home fires burning,
While your hearts are yearning.

Though your lads are far away

They dream of Home;
There's a silver lining
Through the dark cloud shining

Turn the dark cloud inside out,

Till the boys come Home. (Copyright, 1915, by Ascherberg. Hopwood & Crews, Ltd., and published by special arrangement with Chappell & Co., Ltd., 41 East Thirty-fourth Strect, New York City.)

16. PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES IN YOUR OLD KIT-BAG.

(G.)
Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag,

And smile, smile, smile;
While you've a lucifer to light your fag,

Smile, boys-that's the style.
What's the use of worrying?

It never was worth while, so
Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag,

And smile, smile, smile! (Copyright, 1915, in all countries by Francis, Day & Hunter, and published by

special arrangement with T. B. Harins, Francis. Day & Hunter, and Chappell & Co. Ltd., 41 East Thirty-fourth Street, New York City.)

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