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I'll strip all the spring of its earliest bloom;
On her grave shall the cowslip and primrose be cast,
And the new-blossom'd thorn shall whiten her
tomb.'

SONG. BY A WOMAN PASTORALE.

With garlands of beauty the queen of the May No more will her crook or her temples adorn; For who'd wear a garland when she is away, When she is remov'd, and shall never return.

On the grave of Augusta these garlands be plac'd,
We'll rifle the spring of its earliest bloom,
And there shall the cowslip and primrose be cast,
And the new-blossom'd thorn shall whiten her
tomb.

CHORUS ALTRO MODO.

4On the grave of Augusta this garland be plac'd,
We'll rifle the spring of its earliest bloom,
And there shall the cowslip and primrose be cast,
And the tears of her country shall water her tomb.

* ' Each opening sweet of earliest bloom,
And rifle all the breathing spring.'

ColliTu'i Dirge in Cymbelint.

LINES ATTRIBUTED TO DR. GOLDSMITH,

INSERTED IN THE MORNING CHRONICLE
OF APRIL 3, 1800.

E'en have you seen, bath'd in the morning dew,
The budding rose its infant bloom display:

When first its virgin tints unfold to view,

It shrinks, and scarcely trusts the blaze of day.

So soft, so delicate, so sweet she came, Youth's damask glow just dawning on her cheek;I gaz'd, I sigh'd, I caught the tender flame, Felt the fond pang, and droop'd with passion weak.

THE FOLLOWING POEMS HAVE NEVER BEEN INCORPORATED WITH THE PRECEDING ONES OF GOLDSMITH.

(See Citizen of the World, ii. 87). It is the business of the stage poet to watch the appearance of every new player at his own house, and so come out next day with a flaunting copy of newspaper verses. In these nature and the actor may be set to run races, the player always coming off victorious: or nature may mistake him for herself; or old Shakespeare may put on his winding sheet, and pay him a visit, or the tuneful Nine may strike up their harps in his praise; or should it happen to be an actress,Venus, the beauteous Queen of Love, and the naked graces, are ever in waiting. The

lady must be herself a goddess bred and born; she must

but you shall have a specimen of one of these poems, which may convey a more precise idea.

ON SEEING MRS. • • PERFORM IN THE
CHARACTER OF * • • • .

For you, bright fair, the Nine address their lays,
And tune my feeble voice to sing thy praise.
The heartfelt power of every charm divine,
Who can withstand their all commanding shine;
See how she moves along with every grace,
While soul-brought tears steal down each shining
face.

She speaks! 'tis rapture all, and nameless bliss,
Ye gods! what transport e'er compar'd to this.
As when in Paphian groves the Queen of Love
With fond complaint address'd the listening Jover
'Twas joy and endless blisses all around,
And rocks forgot their hardness at the sound.
Then first, at last even Jove was taken in,
And felt her charms, without disguise, within.

(V. Citizen of the World, ii. p. 164). I am amazed that none have yet found out the secret of flattering the worthless, and yet of preserving a safe conscience. I have often wished for some method by which a man might do himself, and his deceased patron justice, without being under the hateful reproach of self-conviction. After long lucubration, I have hit upon such an expedient, and send you the specimen of a poem upon the decease of a great man, in which the flattery is perfectly fine, and yet the poet perfectly innocent.

ON THE DEATH OF THE RIGHT HON. • • •.

Ye muses, pour the pitying tear

For Pollio snatch'd away;
Oh! had he liv'd another year!

He had not died to-day.

Oh! were he born to bless mankind

In virtuous times of yore,
Heroes themselves had fallen behind

Whene'er he went before.

How sad the groves and plains appear,

And sympathetic sheep;
Even pitying hills would drop a tear

If hills could learn to weep.

His bounty in exalted strain Each bard might well display;Since none implored relief in vain That went reliev'd away.

And hark! I hear the tuneful throng

His obsequies forbid,
He still shall live, shall live as long

As ever dead man did.

These verses seem to have been the first rough sketch, afterwards altered and improved into the Elegy on Mrs. Mary Blaize.

(v. Citizen of the World, ii. 193). The weapon chiefly used in the present contest is epigram, and certainly never was a keener made use of. They have discovered surprising sharpness on both sides. The first that came out upon this occasion was a kind of new composition in this way, and might more properly be called an epigrammatic thesis, than an

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