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Hope brings me home when I'm abroad; Soon as the first step homeward's trod, In Hope, to Thee, my God! my God!

I come, I come.

COWPER.

Hope, as an anchor firm and sure holds fast, The Christian vessel, and defies the blast. Hope! nothing else can nourish and secure His new-born virtues, and preserve him

pure. Hope! let the wretch, once conscious of the

joy, Whom now despairing agonies destruy, Speak, for he can, and none so well as be, What treasures centre, what delights in thee. Had he the gems, the spices, and the land, That boasts the treasure, all at his command; The fragrant grove, th' inestimable mine, Were light, when weigbed against ope smile

of thine.

Hope with uplifted foot set free from earth, Pants for the place of her ethereal birth, Òn steady wings sails through th'immense

abyss, Plucks amaranthine joys from bowers of

bliss, And crowns the soul, while yet a mourner

here, With wreaths like those triumphant spirits

wear.

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When life's frail vessel drinks the briny wave,
Chill penury blasts, and storms of care descend,

Anchor'd on thee secure,
She weathers out the storm.

The dungeon knows thy voice: nor gates nur bars
Can Hope exclude,--the poor man's comforter,

The antidote to pain,
The conqueror of death :-

For when this frame decays, and death appears,
Reclin'd on thee the sufferer breathes his last;

And on thy wings he soars,
To stand before his God.

burn,

woes.

With mortal terrors clouds immortal bliss, CAMPBELL.

And shrieks, and hovers o'er the dark abyss ! UNFADING Hope! when life's last embers Daughter of Faith, awake, arise, illume,

The dread unknown, the chaos of the tomb. When soul to soul, and dust to dust return! | Melt, and dispel, ye spectre doubts, that roll Heaven to thy charge resigns the awful hour! Cimmerian darkness on the parting soul! Oh! then, thy kingdom comes ! immortal Fly, like the moon-eyed herald of dismay, Power !

Chas'd on his night-steed by the star of day! What though each spark of earth-born rap. The strife is o'er—the pangs of nature close, ture fly!

And life's last rapture triumphs o'er her The quivering lip, pale cheek, and closing eye!

Hark! as the spirit eyes, with eagle gaze, Bright to the soul thy seraph hands convey The noon of heav'n undazzled by the blaze, The morning dream of life's eternal day- On heav'nly winds that waft her to the sky, Then, then, the triumph and the trance begin Float the sweet tones of star-born melody: And all the Phenix spirit burns within ! Wild as that hallow'd anthem sent to hail Oh! deep enchanting prelude to repose,

Bethlehem's shepherds in the lonely vale, The dawn of bliss, the twilight of our woes ! When Jordan hush'd his waves, and midYet half I bear the parting spirit sigh,

night still It is a dread and awful thing to die ! Watch'd on the holy towers of Zion-hill! Mysterious worlds, untravell’d by the sun, Soul of the just! companion of the dead ! Where Time's far wand'ring tide has never Where is thy home and whither art thou fled !

Back to thy heav'nly source thy being goes, From your unfathom'd shades, and viewless Swift as the comet wheels to whence he rose; spheres,

Doom'd on his airy path a while to burn, A warning comes, unheard by other ears. And doom'd, like thee, to travel, and return. 'T'is heaven's commanding trumpet, long and Hark! from the world's exploding centre loud,

driv'n Like Sinai's thunder, pealing from the cloud! With sounds that shook the firmament of While nature hears, with terror-mingled heav'n, trust,

Careers the fiery giant, fast and far, The shock that hurls her fabric to the dust; On bick’ring wheels, and adamantine car; And, like the trembling Hebrew, when he From planet whirld to planet more remote, trod

He visits realms, beyond the reach of The roaring waves, and called upon his God, thought,

run,

But, wheeling homeward, when his course That sight imparts a never-dying flame, is run

Though feeble in degree, in kind the same. Corbs the red yoke and mingles with the sun! Like him the soul, thus kindled from above, So bath the traveller of earth unfurl'd Spreads wide her arms of universal love; Her trembling wings, emerging from the And, still enlarged as she receives the grace, world ;

Includes creation in her close embrace. And o'er the path by mortal never trud, Sprung to her source, the bosom of her God! Eternal Hope! when yonder spheres sub

lime Peal'd their first notes to sound the march

PRIOR. of Time, The joyous yonth began—but not to fade- CHARITY, decent, modest, easy, kind; When all the sister planets have decay'd ! Softens the high, and rears the abject mind, When rapt in fire the realms of ether glow, Knows with just reins, and gentle hand to And Heav'n's last thunder shakes the world guide below,

Betwixt vile shame, and arbitrary pride : Thon, undismay'd shalt o'er the ruins smile, Not soon provok’d, she easily forgives; And light thy torch at Nature's funeral pile! And much she suffers, as she much believes :

Soft

peace she brings wherever she arrives; She builds our qniet, as she forms our lives : Lays the rough path of peevish nature even;

And opens in each heart a little heav'n. CHARITY

Each other gift which God on man bestows, COWPER.

Its proper bounds, and due restriction knows: True charity, a plant divinely nurs’d, To one fix'd purpose dedicates its pow'r, Fed by the love from which it rose at first, And finishing its act, exists no more. Thrives against hope, and, in the rudest Thus in obedience to wbat heav'n decrees, scene,

Knowledge shall fail, aud prophecy shall Storms but enliven its unfading green :

cease ; Exub'rant is the shadow it supplies, But lasting Charity's more ample sway, Its fruit on earth, its growth above the skies: Nor bound by time, nor subject to decay, To look at Him, who formed us and In bappy triumph shall for ever live, deemed,

And endless good diffuse, and endless praise So glorious now, though once so disesteemed;

receive. To see a God stretch forth his human hand, T' uphold the boundless scenes of his com- As through the artist's intervening glass,

Our eye perceives the distant planets pass; To recollect, that, in a form like ours, A little we discover, but allow He bruised beneath his feet th' infernal That more remains unseen than art can shew; powers,

So whilst our mind its knowledge would Captivity led captive, rose to claim

improve, The wreath he won so dearly in our name;

(Its feeble eye intent on things above) That, throned above all height, he conde- High as we inay, we lift our reason up, scends

By Faith directed, and confirm'd by Hope : To call the few that trust in him his friends; Yet are we able only to survey, That in the Heaven of heavens, that space

Dawnings of beams, and promises of day. be deems

Heaven's fuller effluence mocks our dazzled Too scanty for th' exertion of his beams, sight; And shines, as if impatient to bestow Too great its swiftness, and too strong its Life and a kingdom upon worms below; light.

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But soon the mediate clouds shall be dis. The meanest foe of all the train pell’d:

Has thousands, and ten thousands slain. The sun shall soon be face to face beheld In all his robes, with all his glory on, Thou tread'st npon enchanted ground, Seated sublime on his meridian throne :: Perils and snares beset thee round;

Beware of all, guard every part, Then constant Faith, and holy Hope shall But most, the traitor in thy heart.

die, One lost in certainty, and one in joy: “ Come then, my soul, now learn to wield, Whilst thou, more happy pow'r, fair Charity, The weight of thine immortal shield;" Triumphant sister, greatest of the three, Put on the armour from above Thy office and thy nature, still the saine, Of heavenly truth and heavenly love. Lasting thy lamp, and unconsum'd thy flame, Shalt still survive

The terror, and the charm repel, Shalt stand before the host of heav'n confest, And powers of earth and powers of hell; For ever blessing, and for ever blest. The Man of Calvary triumphed here ;

Why should his faithful followers fear

THE UNION OF THE THREE

GRACES.

PATIENCE AND RESIGNATION.

ANON.

MILTON.

Faith, Hope, and Love, now dwell on

earth, And earth by them is blest; But faith and hope must yield to love,

Of all the graces best.

Hope shall to full fruition rise,

And faith be sight above:
These are the means, but this the end;

For saints for ever love.

MANY are the sayings of the wise
In ancient and in modern books inroll'd,
Extolling patience as the truest fortitude ;
And to the bearing well of all calamities,
All chances incident to man's frail life,

Consolatories writ
With studied argument, and much persua-

sion sought,
Lenient of grief and anxious thought,
But with th'afficted in his pangs their sound
Little prevails, or rather seems a tune
Harsh, and of dissonant mood from his com-

plaint ;
Unless he feels within
Some source of consolation from above,
Secret refreshings, that repair his strength,
And fainting spirits uphold.

FORTITUDE.

BARBAULD.

AWAKB, my soul! lift up thine eyes,
See where thy foes against thee rise,
In long array, a numerous host;
Awake, my soull or thou art lost.

NORRIS.

Here giant Danger threatning stands
Mustering his pale, terrific bands ;
There Pleasure's silken banners spread,
And willing souls are captive led.

SINCB 'tis thy sentence I should part
With the most precious treasure of my heart,

I freely that and more resign,
My heart itself, as its delight, is thine,

My little all I give to Thee,
Thou gav'st a greater gift, thy Son, to me.

See where rebellious passions rage,
And fierce desires and lusts engage;

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