Outline History of Education

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Bay Press, 1911 - 109 páginas

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Página 52 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the neerest by possessing our souls of true vertue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest • perfection.
Página 52 - I here give you then} to dispose of. £The end, then, of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright...
Página 28 - The vital knowledge— that by which we have grown as a nation to what we are, and which now underlies our whole existence, is a knowledge that has got itself taught in nooks and corners; while the ordained agencies for teaching have been mumbling little else but dead formulas.
Página 30 - Pestalozzi, that alike in its order and its methods, education must conform to the natural process of mental evolution —that there is a certain sequence in which the faculties spontaneously develop, and a certain kind of knowledge which each requires during its development ; and that it is for us to ascertain this sequence, and supply this knowledge.
Página 31 - Children should be led to make their own investigations, and to draw their own inferences. They should be told as little as possible, and induced to discover as much as possible.
Página 27 - ... 3. Those activities which have for their end the rearing and discipline of offspring; 4. Those activities which are involved in the maintenance of proper social and political relations; 5. Those miscellaneous activities which make up the leisure part of life, devoted to the gratification of the tastes and feelings.
Página 46 - ... till they have got the habit of doing it well, and not by relying on rules trusted to their memories; has so many advantages, which way soever we consider it, that I cannot but wonder (if ill customs could be wondered at in any thing) how it could possibly be so much neglected.
Página 44 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is placed in this: That a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, though the appetite lean the other way.
Página 22 - I consider these branches merely as leading to a higher aim — to qualify the human being for the free and full use of all the faculties implanted by the Creator — and to direct all these faculties towards the perfection of the whole being of man, that he may be enabled to act in his peculiar station as an instrument of that all-wise and almighty Power that has called him into life?
Página 8 - APPERCEPTION is THEREFORE THAT PSYCHICAL ACTIVITY BY WHICH INDIVIDUAL PERCEPTIONS, IDEAS, OR IDEA-COMPLEXES ARE BROUGHT INTO RELATION TO OUR PREVIOUS INTELLECTUAL AND EMOTIONAL LIFE, ASSIMILATED WITH IT, AND THUS RAISED TO GREATER CLEARNESS, ACTIVITY AND SIGNIFICANCE.* We are well aware that this explanation does not fully exhaust the nature of apperception.

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