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POPULAR OPINIONS.

SIR, The opinions of the people of England appear to be as various as the impulses of individual interests differ one from another. The affairs of the nation, and of the world, are so intimately blended with personal interest, and na tional prejudice, that the whole compact has grown by private contention, and the national security combined by national prejudice, into a bulwark bordering on impressions arising from ignorance.— When one looks around at the present period, every separate interest is seen jingling its unreserved discussions with the national wisdom.—The great class of proprietors of land, and farmers in rueful mood exhibit dangers impending on reductions conducive to public plenty. —The richer cry aloud on the dismal esfects of the property tax ; the mercantile joining in its heart-rending expositions.The middling, against the price of all the necessaries of life.—The manufacturer, against the difficulties and expences, attending the profits of his labour.--The labourer and poorer class, violently against mechanical inventions destructive to manual labour, and eonsequent inability to meet the exhorbitant demand for food.—The beggar, against the inadequacy of charitable donations, in a country exceeding every other in the known world for expenditure of this nature; and every class in unison of bitter exclanation on the general oppression of taxation. Let it be admitted, much room may exist for excitations to complaint: and that it is well in the privilege of iiberty to express public grievances in public meetings; yet, be it remembered by a people who have struggled to the very acme of national pre-eminence and glory, in a tide of patriotism immortalising the annals of their age, that the sacri. fice of national ease and personal luxury may yet be required devotedly to be said on the altar of that pre-eminence and glory, that, unarnished, it may reflect its łustre on surrounding nations, and the blessings of universal peace 1. But, is not that lustre tarnishing? There rests the doubt; and in that doubt let it rest, while a momentary glance is cast on the represented people in its assembled council. Ask, what are the impressions it should excite? what are the impressions it does excite? Let any impartial man

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listen to the debates of this exalted assembly :—if he be a foreigner, what his surprise—if an Englishman, tenacious of his birthright, what the shock to his feelings, when, fondly anticipating the deliberations of reason, and the unbiassed decisions of sound judgment, he finds it labouring from the beaten paths of nobleness and wisdom, into the wilds of unmannerly witticism, and personal invective; while the great national cause, unaided by virtuous deliberation, proceeds on the sole discretion of ninisters' 'till waking from the wrangling of personal animosities, they below for lost rights of the constitutional charter, they themselves in their madness have left sinking unheeded, while lacerating the national pride and worrying the public feeling. On this subject, let some sinp'e questions elicit from some better informed on constitutional policy, why so many vacant seats are permitted when the affairs of the nation ought to dictate the presence of every representative of the people at every meeting of partiament 2 why one hears of ministers being obliged to solicit from every part of the kingdom, nay, from many parts of the continent, the attendance of members to the houses of parliament, when it should be a palamount duty in their election to the publié service. ? Can it be, that the sons of noblemen and wealthy gentlemen are bought into honours, to which their mental unworthiness renders their absenee more honourable to the nation,than the favour of their presence useful, unless when an insignificant yea or may is demanded by the usage of parliament 2 If one turn the view to another point, still is seen the long impressed reign of prejudice and hostility, flaining with unabated fetality, Nothing satisfies this seeing bot the contemplation of the complete subversion of American republican indepen&nce; even with the signature of peace before one's eyes, victory in a delage of ilood and carnage is anxiously anticipated both on sea and land, as a regererative poinciple for the imbecility of national exortion. On the other hand, although there no longer exists a Napoleon, to direct the terrifying energies of once allpowerful France, yet the sufferings of this feeling is alleviated with nothing sess than the total annihilation of its power; safety emanates, only in the prospect of its cons

pression on every side by the absorption of independent states, no matter how subversive of natural rights, or unwarranted in justice, Yet many years may not pass over, when oppressed Europe may look back with regret, that the preponderait mätary power is not France—that the dictator of the ocean is not England. The charm which gave decided vritory to the arous of France, where ever they appeared, is shattered in the entrance of hostile armies into Paris; the spirit which once ania) ited their fragments can never more be coin},ined, to render them fearful to the repose of Europe. No, nor perhaps will the naval ascendaney of England

eyer render necessary such another rise of military genius, or such varied systems of

continental combination. One more view, and I have done—one wirich claims atten

tion, and is disposed to excite anxieties of

no trifiug interest. Russia, elated by its military rowess, glowing with an ardour natural to humanity, may easily burst its frozen bonds, and pour its barbarous torde; on the lights of the civilized world; and, in its rugged efforts, rend the hard won laurel ere it firinly entwine the proud expectant brow of Britain, and with iiie broken emblem decorate its own, yet but a little since trans-atlantic colonies.-i}ut it is the inevitable fate of man, of nations, perhaps of worlds, to arrive at some given point in perfection, then to retrogade until lost in the obscurity of eternity, and are heard of no more I AMrCUS RRITANN IAE.

BU on A PARTE IN FRANCE | | |

This uulooked for and extraordinary occurrence was anounced last night to the asteuished iniiabitants of the metropolis, by the publication of the following official documents in all the evening papers: ORD ONNANCE OF THE KING, CCNTAIN ING MEASUR ES OF GENERAL SAFETY. “Louis by the Grace of God, King of France and Navarre, to all those who shall see these presents, health. “The 12th article of the Constitutional Charter charges us especially with making regulations and ordonnances necessary for the safety of the State. It would be essentially compromised if we did not take prompt measures to repress the enterprise which has just begin formed upon ole of the points of our kingdom, and to 1 revent the effect of plots and "A

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hands in the Department of the War. It is enjoined to all Governors, Commandants of the armed force, NationalGuards, Civil Authorities, and even simple Citizens, to arm. against him, to arrest and carry him before a Council of War, which, after having recognised his identity, shall apply to him the penalties pronounced by the Law. 2. Shall be punished with the same penalties, and as guilty of the same (‘rinles. “The soldiers and persons of every grade, who shall have accompaniedo. followed the said Buonaparte in his invasion of the French territory, unless in the delay of eight days from the pubfication of the present ordonnance, they come and make their submission to our Governors, Commanders of Military Divisions, Generals, or Civil Administrators. “3. Shall be equally prosecuted and punished as a bettors and accomplices of rebelliou, and of attempts to change the form of Government and provoke civil war, all civil and military administrators, chiefs, and persons cmpioyed in the said administration, payers and receivers of public money, even simple citizens, who shall, directly or indireetly, lend aid to Buonaparte. “4. Shall be punished with the same penalties, conformably to the 102d article of the Penal Code, those who by speeches made in public placcs or societies, by placards stuck up, or by printed writings, shall have taken part, or engaged citizens to take part in the revolt, or to abstain from repelling it. “5. Our Chancellor, Ministers, Secretaries of State, and our Director-General of Police, each in what concerns him, are charged “ith the execution of the present Ordonnance,which shall be inserted in the Bulletin of Laws, addressed to all Governors of Military divisions, Generals, Commanders, Prefects, SubPrefeets, and Mayors of our kingdom, with orders to cause it to be printed and stuck up at Paris, and wherever else it may be needful. “Given at the Castle of the Thuilleries, 6th March, 1815, and the 20tla year of our reign. (Signed) * Louis.

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on the Kiso, “The Chuo cellor of i rance, OAM or AY.” Pło Co-AN. A "t)^.

Joy's VO CAT, 10 N C F 'I H E L to G is A T L P. F.

“We had on the 31st December last adjourned the two Houses, to resume their sittings on the 1st May. During that time we had been preparing the objects upon which they were to occupy themselves. The march of the Congress of Vienna permitted us to believe in the general establishment of a solid and durable peace; and we were engaged, without ceasing, in all those laiours which might ensure the tranquility and happiness of the people. This träuquility is disturbed—this happiness may be co-promised by malevolence and treaThe promptitude and wisdom of the measures which we are taking will check ti:eir progress. Full of confidence in the zeal of which our Chambers have given us proofs, we are eager to cali them around us.

“ of the enemies of the country have founded their hope upon the divisions which they have always endeavoured to

foment, its supporters, its legal defen

ders will destroy that criminat hole by

the unattackable force of an undestructi. i, ie uriiga. - --o'“ for these caeses, we have ordered

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“A i. 1. The Chamber of Peers and the Chamber of eputies of Lepartneuts are convoked extraordinarily in the usual place of their sittings. “2. The Peers and Leputies of Departments absent from Paris, shall repair thither as soon as they are informed of the present Procłamation. “3. The pressent Proclamation sl: "I be inserted in the Bulletin of aws, adfiressed to all the Prefects, Sub-prefects, Mayors, and Miunicipalities of the king. doin, published and stuck up at Paris, aud every w lieie else. “4 our Chancelor and our Ministers, each in what concerns thein, are chargea with the execution of the present, “Given at the Castie of tie Thujile. rics, Gth Miarch, and of our reigh the 29th. (Signed) “Alot Is.” DRUP BING THE YAN KEES 11 | Well Johnny Bull what do you think of matters now. Does the following builetin shew that you have been able, as the 7atriotic Alderman said you would, to give the Yankees “a coufounded drub

bing.” But I find I must postpone my remarks on tilis interesting subject. The lauding of Napoleon in France will occupy public attention for some days at least. They appear already as inad about this event as they were when they heard of his deposition ; but, although a great many are rejoicing at this occurrence, who formerly exuited in his downfall, such is the fickle disposition of honest John, that it will be some time before his sentiments upon this stoject, or his opihion as to the defeat of His .", illerican army ire properly ascertained. }} | }. I. ET | N. Jar Bejartment, jiarch 8, 1815. | Captain Wysły arrived this morning with dispatches so in Major-G, i.era! Lambert, detaiting tie operatios against the enemy in the neighbourhood of New Greans. }t appears that the arm.y to:der the comułaud of A$3 cr (, oral Keane, was ian:!ed at the Head of the Bayone, in the vicinity of New Orleans, on the morning of the 23d i eccini:er, , without opposition; it v 3 s, , how ever, attacked by the eneio y in the coorse of the night succeeding the landing, when, after an olistinate centest, the enom., were reposed on of points with cenzoderai.ie foss. On the inoriog of the 25th, Sir E. Pokenham arrived, and assurned the costood of the ority. On the 27th at day-light, the troops thoved forward, driving the es: Iny's picquets to within six ini'ts of the town, when the main body of the enemy was discowered postco i.ehind a treast-work, extending ai, ott i o) ords, with the right resting on the Mississipi, and the left on a thick wood. The interv between the 27th December, and the 9th January, was eiopigyed in preparations for an attack upon the enemy’s position. 'i'i.e attack wiłich was intended to have been made on the night of the 7th, did not, owing to the diifit oities experienced in the passage of the A4ississippi, by a corps under Lieut. Colonel 4 hornton, which was destined to act on the right look of the river, take place till carly on the mori;ing of the 8th. he division, to whom tile storming of the enemy's work was, elitrusted, moved to the attack at that time, but being too soon diseovered by the enemy were received with a galling and severe fire from all parts of their fire. Major-General Sir Edward Fakenham, who had placed

is imself at the Lead of the troops, was unfortui.ately killed at the head of 1:e glacis, and Major-Generals Gibbs and Keane were nearly at the same moment wounded. The effect of this upon the troops caused a he-itation in their advance, and though order was restored by the advance of the reserve under Major-General Lambert, to who in the command of the army had devolved, and Colonel Thornton had *cceeded in the operation assigned to him on the right bank of the river; yet the Major-General, upon the consideration of the didiculties which yet 1 inained to be stirmounted, did not think himself justified in ordeling a renewal of the attack. The troops, therefore, retired to 1 he position which they had occupied previous to the attack. in that position they remained till the evening of the 18th when the whole of the wounded, with 1He exception of 80 (whom it was considered dangerous to remove) the field artillery, and all the stores of every description, having been embarked, the army retired to the head of the Bayone, where the landing had been originally effected, and re-embarked without inolestation. Names of Officers killed and wounded and the missing in the Action of the 8th of January. Killed.-General Staff—Major-Gencral Hon. Sir F. Pakenham, Commander of the Forces; Capt. Thomas Wilkinson, 85th, Major of Brigade. 4th Foot—Ensign Wm. Crowe. 7th Ditto—Major George King, Captain George Isenry. 21st Ditto—Major J. A. Whittaker, Capt. R. Renny (Lieut.-Col.), Lieut. Donald M. Donald. 44th Ditto—Lieutenant R. Davies, and Ensign Milosky. 93d Ditto.--Lieut.-Col. R. Dale, Capts. T. Ilitchins, and A. Muirhead. W ou N p od.—General Staff—Major-General Gibbs, severely, since dead; Major-General Keane, se. overely ; Captains H. F. Shaw, 4th Foot, (British infantry), slightly, and L. Delacy Evans, 3d 1)ragoons, D. A. Q. M. G. severely. 4th Foot—-Lieut.-Col. F. Brooke, slightly ; Major A D. France, Lieut.-Col. severely. Captains.J. Williamson, J. Jones, J. W. Fletcher, R. Erskine, severely, and D. S. Craig, slightly ; Lieutenants W. H. Brooke, B. Martin, G. Richardson, W. Squire, C. H. Farringham, James Marshal, H. Andrews, severely, and E. P. IIopkins, J. Salvin, P. Baulby, G. H. Hearne, slightly ; Ensigns 'Thomas Burrell, severely, and A. Gerrard, J. Fernandez, E. Newton, slightly; Adjutant W. Richardson, severely. 7th Foot–Captains W. E. Page, severely, J. J. A.

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8th Jan. 1815. Killed--Royal Artillery.—Lieut. Alex. Ramsay Royal Engineers—Lieut. Peter Wright. 4th Fool--Capt. Francis Johustone, and Lieut. John Sutherland. 21st. ditto—Copt. Wm. Contan. 44th diito—Lieut. John Blakeney. 85th ditto—Captains Charles Gray, and Charles Harris. 1st. West India Regt.—Capt. Francis Collings. Wou N Dr D.—Generał Stail.—Lieu'.-Col. Stoven. 28th Foot, A. A. G. severely, not dangerously; Major Hooper, 87th Pool, D. A. G. severely (leg amputated ; Lieut. D lancy Evans, 3d Dragoons, D. A. Q. M. G. severely. Royal Artillery—Lieuts. James Christie, severely, and B. 3, Poynter, slightly. 4th Foot—Lieut. Thos. Moody, severely. 21st Foot—Lieut. John Levock, slightly. 43; ditto—Lieut. Edward D'Arcy, severely (both legs amputated. 85th Foot—Capt. James Knox, Lieuts. George Willings, F. Maunsell, W. Hickson, and Robert Charlton, severely: Lieut. J. W. Boys, slightly; Ensign Sir Fred. Eden, severely (since dead); Ensign Thomas Armsby, slightly. 93d ditto---Lieut. A. Phaup, severely (since dead). 97th ditto---Capt. W. Hallen, and Lieut. Daniel Forbes, severely ; Lieut. J. G. Farmer, slightly. Miss ING...--85th Foot---Lieut. Walker, and Ensign George Ashton. 95th ditto--Major Samuel Mitchell, Grand Total - 24.54

Printed and Published by G. Houston; No. 192, Strand ; where all Communication, addressed to the
Editor are requested to be forwarded.

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vol.xxvii. No. 11.] LoNDON, saturday, MARCH 18, 1815. [Price is.

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quest of the persons who had signed the

said Request. This his letter, together 'with a proposition for further proceedings, shall be published next week, after I have had an opportunity of consulting personally with some of the Gentlemen who signed the Requisition. And, for this purpose, I beg leave to invite such of these Gentlemen as may have leisure, to meet me at: THE DOLPHIN INN, AT BOTLEY, on Saturday next, the 25th inst. at 12 o'clock in the day. It

will be as convenient to every body else to go to Botley as to go to Winchester,

and much more convenient to me to re

main at home, especially as I have already been much from home on the bu

siness. : When met, we shall be able to adopt some plan for the signing of petitions in all parts of the county. No one will deny, that we have a RIGHT to Petition, that is to say, to PRAY. The poorest of us may PRAY even to God; and, surely, we may PRAY to the Parliament 1 In our Church service, in our

Common Prayer Book, there are prayers

against DEARTH, and thanksgivings for plenty, or cheapness; and, surely, when corn is cheap, we may PRAY. to the Parliament not to pass a law, tending to make it dear ! The moment that the Corn Bill appeared, in the House of

Commons, that moment I declared, that

if there was but one man in all England to petition against it, I would be that After very attentively listening to

upon the subject, my hatred, my abhorrence of this Bill have only been more strongly confirmed. I shall, therefore, continue to do every lawful act in my power to prevent it becoming a law. If only one Gentleman from every town, and from every considerable village, were to attend at Botley, the work of signing Petitions might be very easily and speedily accomplished. ' - WM. COBBETT.

NAPOLEON'S RETURN.

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know, that, surrounded as he has been,

that he **.dome.jpgre thanahp.

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