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vol. XIV. No. 22.1 LONDON, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, isos. [Price top.

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833] HAMPs H 1 Re MEFT N G, For the nomination of a member to serve in Parliament, in the room of Sir Henry Mildmay, Baronet, deceased ; which meetirg was held at Winchester, on the 23d of November, 1808, in consequence of the follow-ung Requisition and Notification. “To the High Sheriff of the County of Southampton. JWinchester, Vov. 15, 1808. * Sir : —The much lamented death of Sir HENRY PAULET ST. Joh N MILDMAY, Balt. having occasioned a vacancy in the representation of this county, we earnestly intreat you to call a meeting of the gentlemen, clergy, and freeholders, to consider of a proper person to be put in nomination to succeed to him as early as convenient. H. Drummond, William Garrett, L. B. Wither, Wm. Deacon, Wm. Heathcote, George Garrett, P. Williams, James JDeacon, John Garnett, David Lance, John Blackburn, Wm. Fitzhugh, J. W. S. Gardiner, S. Harrison. “In compliance with the above requrt, I do hereby appoint a meeting of the gentiemen, clergy, and freeholders of the county of Southampton, to be holden at the castle of Winchester, in the said county, on Wednesday next, at twelve o'clock at noon, for the purpose above-mentioned.—G. H. MITCHELL, Sheriff. Titch/?old Lodge, Nov. 17, 1 SOS.” At twelve o'clock, the sheriff opened the business, having adjourned from tile Courtoutse (which was considered as too small to hold the Freeholders assembled upon the occasion) to the Grand Jury Chamber, into which persons, who wished to take an active art in the proceedings, were admitted, while the assemblage of Freeholders remained in the Castle-yard, and were addressed from the windows. The Sheriff having read the requisition, ..nd stated his intention finally to take the sense of the meeting by the shew of hands, Sir THoMA's MILLER, Baronet, came torward, and recommended, as a proper person to represent the county, the Ison. Willi AM HERBERT, which was seconded by Sir CHARLEs M L I., Bait. Then or

Jo HN Pollt N, Bart. recommended THes’ FREEMAN HEAT is cot E, F-q. a son of Sir WILLIAM HEATH core, which recommendation was seconded by Sir NATHANIEL HolLAND. i hese formalities having, in the course of a few minutes, been gone through, Mr. PokT \l, a friend of Mr. Herbert, caine forward, and began an address to the feeholders, with observing upon the unfairness of the conduct, which, upon this particular occasion, the Sheriff had been induced, from the party purposes of those who signed the requisition and others connected with them, to pursue. He said, that the notice to the freeholders was so short, that it was impossible, supposing every one of them to see the newspapers in due course of their publication, all the freeholders could have been apprized of this day's meeting ; because, the provincial papers do not bear date till the Monday ; are not, in fact, delivered till the Monday, except in places localy favoured in this respect ; are not delivered in many parts of the county till the Wednesday roorning ; and, therefore, it was very probabie, and, indeed, almost certain, that there were many of the freeholders at home, reading the notification for the holding of this meeting, at the very moment that the meeting was holding. He appealed to all who heard him, whether such a notice was not unprecedented ; whether any meeting, of this sort, had, by any Sheriff, ever been before called, without, at least, two weeks notice ; and, he expressed his hope, that no Sherii would hereafter, from any motives whatever, and especially from motives such as those which had evidently prevailed in this instance, be induced to do what had now been d'oise Mr. Portal then called the attention of the meeting to the perious situation of Europe in general, and of Spain and Portugal in particular. He said, to at the question was how to be decided, and that there appeared to be little time left for the decisiou, whether the brave, the gener is, and the noble Spaniards were to be delivered from the grasp of the unprior, pled, unsparing and ferocious tyranny of the "-spot of France, or whether they wers , , ue, so

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under that grasp, and with them the last remaining hope of the deliverance of Europe. He said, that we had sent out a numerous and gallant army that the nation, with an unanimous voice, prayed for their success ; but, that, numerous and brave as our armies and our fleets were known to be, still there was need of a directing mind at home; need of able men, and men of habits of business, in the House of Commons. He said, that, since the proceedings with regard to the Convention of Cintra, it became more than ever necessary to provide a check upon the conduct of the ministry, who had shown, in a manner almost unequivocal, that they meant to screen those, whom the people, of all ranks and degrees, had, with an unanimous voice, accused of having injured and disgraced the country. Mr. Herbert, he said, had, during the short time that he had the honour to represent the county, fully proved, by his eonstant attention to his duty; by his independent conduct; and by the great talents he displayed, that he was a proper person again to be chosen for the county, under the present awful circumstances ; and that, therefore, not only because he thought Mr. Herbert to be, for several reasons, the fittest person of the two, but, also because the other candidate was already (though they might never have heard of it) a member of parliament, he strongly recommended to the Freeholders of the connty to show, by a decided majority in the show of hands, that the sense of the county was in his favour. MR. Cobbett, who stood at another window, then spoke as follows:—“Gentlemen, we have just been reminded of the necessity there is of our making exertions for the deliverance of Europe. The little, with which I shall take the liberty to trouble

you, will be of an humbler cast, having

for its principal object, to effect, in time, and in some small degree, at least, the deliverance of Hampshire. In certain nations, where the great body of the people were slaves, it was a custom with the slaveholders, to give them, at certain fixed periods, a holiday, and to ply them plentifully with drink ; one of the principal purposes of which appears to have been, that the children of the slave-holders, from witnessing the beastly behaviour, the senseless noise, uproar, and confusion, that seldom failed to prevail amongst the degraded wretches, upon these occasions, might, at an early age, contract a deep-rooted abhorrence of the odious vice of drunkenness. Too nearly resembling the means, but with an end in view somewhat different, are the

means generally employed by thos, who, as yet, condescend to design”: us, for one week in seven years, by the fir. tering name of “gentlemen,” but who, coless we now make a stand for our rights at liberties, will, all the year round, and do ing all the seven years, bestow upon cs is: better-merited appellation of slaves. Bo, Gentlemen, I am not without hope, that to result of this day's proceedings, notwithstanting the unusual and unprecedented and ut: justifiable shortness of the notice for asser bling ; a notice grown out of a requisitio signed by those who called the honourao baronet lately deceased, by the endear: name of friend, and who have now hastero to seek for some one to fill his place bes |

his corpse was scarcely cold ; a requisitor fi crim persons who call themselves gentirno of “liberal education and generous habits

though it is impossible to form an idea of proceeding more illiberal, more ungenero, discovering a more complete want of allo and gentleman-like feeling; in spite, Iso of the shortness of the notice to the frtholders in general, while secret means ho been long using to procure and insure à tial attendance, I do hope, Gentlemen, to the result of this day's proceedings wo convince those, who have been the imm

diate cause of our assembling, and, inder

which is of much more importance, to nation at large, that, though the freehold: of Hampshire, have, in common with |

rest of their countrymen, sost much of th: rights and liberties, yet, at any rate, t they have sense enough remaining to ko what those rights and liberties are. Before I have done, Gentlemen, it is to intention to submit to you a propostko respecting A PLEDGE, which I deem is so duty to obtain from one or the other of to candidates, before I give my vote for eith: and, if I should succeed in convincing so. that to require this pledge is reasonable, to and conformable to the principles of to constitution, I shall, of course, hope, to you will, in this respect, follow my to ample. There is a doubt, Gentlemen, of the question, whether, after a member returned to parliament, he is bound to abo by the subsequent instructions of his coo tuents; but, I take it, there can be * doubt at all, that before we elect a membo! we have not only a right to ascertain, to that it is our bounden duty to ascertain, to his intentions are to act agreeably to to leading principles, the adhering to who may, in our opinion, be essential to * well-being of our country. The poo for which we are met, Gentlemen, ". stated in the requisition, and as sanctioned by the Sheriff, is this : “to con“ sider of a proper person to be put in “nonination” to serve the county as a member of parliament. Now, Gentlemen, this is a serious and solemn occasion, and so, I hope, you will consider it. We are not met for the vile purpose of hallooing and hooting at the holding up of the finger of a party leader ; we a e not met to degrade ourselves beneath the beasts that pe. Ish, but to exercise our judgment ; to decide upon an important question, agreeably to the dictates of reason and of conscience. Apparently, all those, whom I have the honour of addessing, are the friends, some of one of the candid ites and some of the other ; and, I can assure you, that I am the enemy of neither. They are both gentlemen of sortune and of respectable family; and, of such members of parliament ought to consist. I am for choosing neither vagabonds nor upstarts, who, in general, when possessed of power, prove the worst tyrants. I object to neither of these gentlemen ; but, before I give my vote, I must have an assurance, that the person for whom I vote will do, upon certain great points, that which I think is essential to the public good; and, in order that you may see the reasonableness of the assurance that I require, I will, with your indulgence, now state to you what the constitution says respecting the points which I have more immediately in view. First, then, Gentlemen, the constitution declares, that “ the election of “ members to serve in parliament shall he “free"; thereby meaning, that no undue influence of any sort shall be made use of to bias the minds, or obtain the votes of the electors ; and next, which is what I more particularly wish you to attend to, it declares, “ that no person, “ place of prost, under the king, or having a pension from the crown, shall be “-capable of serving as a member of the “ House of Commons.” And, Gentlemen, if you consider the duties, which members of parliament have to perform, you will see the justice and reasonableness of this excellent rule of the Constitution, of all which duties, the first and greatest is, to see that the people's money is not improperly granted, and, when granted, not improperly expended. The House of Commons are called the guardians of the public treasure ; and, sometimes, still more emphatically, the holders of the national purse-strings. Now only think, Gentlemen, of the great importance of this office. How long would each of you

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deliberate; what scrutinizing inquiries would A

holding an office, or

you make what solemn promises would you exact, before you would intrust any one with the absolute care and management of your purse. Would you not be quite certain, that he w is possessed of integrity enough to secure it from the light fingers of the pick-pocket, and of resolution more than sufficient to defend the open assaults of the highway robber Yes; and how many years of probation, would you require, before you ventured to or to hoto the to king out of the poise inst a to iro in as d ? Besides, Gentlemen, we art to ouslder what is the company, anongst whom we are about to send either Mr. Herber or Mr. Heathcote ; for, unfurnished with that knowledge, it is next to impossible that we should be able to judge which of them is best calculated for the duty we are about to impose upon one or the other. It is a rule in common life to fit the person, or the animal, to the service : we use a dog and not a sheep for the driving of cattle. Let us see, then, what sort of company that is, into which we are going to send one of the two gentlemen, who have been this day presented to us, as proper to be entrusted with the holding of the strings of our purse. And, here, Gentlemen, I must, with your leave, refer to a written memorandum of names and sums. The House of Commons, which now consists of 0.58 members, ontains persons, who enjoy the elnoluments of 112 places and pensions. But, before I proceed further, suffer me to state to you upon what authority I am about to lay before you these interesting facts. They are drawn from a Report presented to the House of Commons, in consequence of a motion, made by that intelligent, upright, disinterested, and valiant nobleman, Lord CochRANE, who, having so often defeated the enemies of England at sea, appears to have wished to contribute towards defeating its more dangerous enemies on shore. His lordship's motion, which would have brought into view all the placed and pensioned relations of the members, was, in a great measure defeated ; but, we have, at any rate, got some information from it. The list, even of the members themselves, is very incom p/ete. It is acknowledged to be incomplete by those who make the Report. Many of the offices, out of mere modesty, I suppose, have not the amount of the emoluments placed against them ; and, there are several placemen and pensioners, owing to the want of the returns from the department whence their emoluments arise, who are not metationed at all, in any part of the Report. But, even from this Report, imperfect as it is, it

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appears, that there actually are, in the House of Commons, 78 members, who are placemen or pensioners; that they enjoy amongst them 112 places and pensions ; that these places and pensions amount to £178,904 a year, which sum, if it were equally divided, would give to each member of the whole House, 6'272 a year ; and, I am convinced, that, if all the enjoluments had been annexed, and all the names brought into view, the sum would have been double what it now appears. What, then, would you say, if you, could behold the long list of places and pensions enjoyed by the relations of the different members ? Suffer me now to state some particulars from this list; because they very nearly concern ourselves. First, Gentlemen of Romsey, there is your noble neighbour, my Lord Palmerston, who receives so 1,000 a year. Secondly, Gentlemen of Bishop's Waltham, there is your neighbour, Mr. Sturges Bourne (who was standing amongst some tall men in the crowd, at the time) receives £1,500 a year. Thirdly, Gentlewnen of the Isle of Wight, there is your Governor, my Lord Fitzharris, who, as governor of the Island, receives r& 1,370, and, observe, he has taken care to have a grant of this place for his life, sick or well; though, I most say, that in all probability, he is as able to command a military force, being bed-ridden, as if he were actually on the back of his charger. This lord has, besides, secured a further grant of the public money to the amount of so 1,200 a year for life, to commence after his father's, Lord Malmsbury's, death, and Lord Malmsbury has received for fifteen years past, and is to receive for his life, a pension of so 2,300 a year. This, Gentlemen, is the new Lord Lieutenant of our county. A pensioner, paid out of the fruit of our labour, industry, ingenuity, and ceconomy. Fourthly ; and now I must beseech you to chlarge your minds in a degree proportioned to the increasing magnitude of my subject : He that hus ears to hear, let him hear ; for I am about to speak of the sums enormous, wiłich Mr. George Rose and his sons have received and do receive and are to receive out of the pockets of this taxed a tion. First, as Treasurer of the Navy, he receives, .44,324 a year ; next, as Clerk of the Parliame, is, which place he has for life, and in which he has never perfornied an hour's duty, he receives, and has received ever since the year 1783, the sum of of 3,278 a year ; next, this place is granted to his son, Mr. George Henry Rose for life, who is also a member of partiament ; next, Mr. G. Rose has another sinecure place, as

Keeper of the Records in the Exchequer, for which he receives of 400 a year ; and next, his younger son, Mr. Willian Start Rose, has a sinecure place in the Excheqver, for which he receives o£2.137 a war. Which sums put together, make £10,130 a year, which Mr. Rose, and his sons receive out of the taxes annually raised upon us; and, he having, upon an average, received about five thousand a year for office salary, besides sinecures, since the year 1783, I am far within the compass when I assert, that he and his sons alone have received out

of the taxes of this back-broken conntry

THREE HUNDRED THOUSAND POUNDS STERLING.—Such, Gentlemen, is, in part at least, the company, into which we are going to send either Mr. Herbert or Mr. Heathcote. Does it not, then, behove us well to consider, what sort of man that

is, whom we thus send? We are about to send,

according to the language of the constitutich, a person to be the guardian of our money, a check upon the minister in all things, but more especially to be a check upon his conduct as an expender of our money : does it, not, therefore, become us to be as sure as we possibly, in such a case, can be, that this guardian whom we choose, will not homself receive any of this money fron, the minister ; and is it not to be guilty of the grossest self-abuse to pretend to believe that he will be a check upon the minister, if he himself be permitted to receive a share of what the minister may choose to expend or give away But, Gentlemen, there would be, in such conduct, on our part, something a great deal worse than folly. There would be in it the basest treachery towards the rest of our countrymen ; for, you are to remem. ber, that there is not one man in five huidred who can, as things now stand, vote for members of parliament. With the interests of persons, of this description, in this county, we are charged, as well as with our ow. , and, therefore, if, in choosing a memori, we consider only our individual interest, we are guilty of dishonesty ; and, if we, from negligence, choose an improper person, we are guilty of a flagrant and shameful want of duty towards our neighbour. The way, Gentlemen, in which I think I shall best discharge my duty, is, to tender to the candidates the pledge, of which I Lave already spoken, for the requiring of which I have, with your great patience and indulgence, given spy reasons, and the words of which, with the confid: ut hope, that they will meet with the approbation of every truly honest and independent man who hears me, I will now conclude with reading : “That * he will never, either directly or indirect“ ly, either by himself or by any person “ related to him or dependent upon him, “ receive a single shilling of the public “ money, in any shape whateve r, so long “ as he shall live ; and that he will use the “ utmost of his endeavours to obtain for this burthened people a redress of all their manifold grievances, and especially of that most crying grievance of having “ their money voted away by those, “ amongst whom there are many who receive part of that money.” After this, a person, whose name was said to be Brow N who was stated to have been a purser, or something of that sort, under Lok D KEITH ; and who now lives, it was said, at Purbrook-Heath, having begun to speak below, was called up to the window, were, having read from the report of the Debates in the short parliament, a passage wherein Mr. Herbert was represented as having proposed the disfranchisement of the borough of Lancaster, on account of their conduct relating to their member, Colonel CA witHo RNE, he, Mr. Brown, inferred that Mr. Herbert had proposed to disfranchise the said borough, merely because the the voters had presented a petition disagreegèle to the House. MIR, HERE FR T then canne forward, and began by defending himself against the charge preferred by Mr. Brown ; but, owing to the inarticulate sound of his voice it was impossible to catch more than a very sinail part of what he said. He defended the conduct of himself and l.is friends; stated that he had never, in any single instance, shown himself dependent upon the ministry, and challenged any one to prove the contrary. He condemned the conduct of the present ministry, with regard to the Inquiry now going on, and complimented the country upon the soirit it had shown, in seconding the laud. able and constitutional efforts of the City of London. With respect to the proposed pledge, he said, he would promise, in the most distinct terms, that he never would, as kog as he lived, accept of sinecure or pension, and that he would reject, with scorn, the offer of either; but, that he would give no Pledge, that, if the king should, at any time, think his services useful to the country, he would not accept of a proper compensation for such services; and this, he trusted, would be satisfactory. Upon perceiving, that Mr. Cobbett signified his dis-,ent from this proposition, Mr. Herbert asked, what objection he had to it 2 to which Mr. Cobbett answered, “ Those services I have no “objection to, won to their bog well paid

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“ for ; but I know of no services which can ‘‘ be performed by a member of parliament, “ which ought to be paid for.” MR. Heathcote said nothing that could be heard, except as to the proposed p/edge, which he refused to give, though he said, that “if he knew his own mind, he never ... should receive a farthing of the public “ money as long as he lived ‘’ Mr. BAR HAM perceiving that Mr. Herbert's explanation as to his conduct, in resPect to the petition from Lancaster, had not been clearly understood, came to the window, and, in a very clear and satisfactory manner, showed, that Mr. Herbert's conduct, upon the occasion referred to, was not only blameless but deserving of the highest praise. Having completely removed the impression produced by the erroneous

said, that he had a test, whereby to try the candidates, to whom he put this question : “ Will you, if the Inquiry, now going on, “ respecting the Convention of Cintra, “ should end in a blank report of merely ‘‘ all's well, bring forward, or support, in “ parliament, a motion for another and ‘‘ more satisfactory mode of Inquiry 2"— Mr. Herbert answered distinctly in the affirmotive; Mr. Heathcote gave no answer at all. The Sherifi now put the question to the Freeholders, which of the two candidates they chee to put in nomination; and the majority appeared in favour of Mr. HeathCoue. o *** I must put off, till next week, what I int nded to have snid, respecting the Income of the Duke of York; the proceedings of Joe Court of Inquiry; and the conduct of the Mayor of London.

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NEW EDITION OF THE STATE TRIALS. On Monday, the 2d of Junuary, 1800, will be pullished (to he completed in Thirty-sir Month/y Parts, forming Twelve very large Polumes in Hoyal Octavo), Part the first, Price los. 04, of C() (, ; };"| "I'S COMPLETE CO: , I, ECTION OF STATE TRIALS, AND Pro CE EDINGS For HIGH TREA son, AND or H E R C R IM ES AND MIS DEMEA No Rs, FROM THIE EAR LI I, ST PERIOD Dow N TO T H E Pro E S N T i i Mi re. In proceeding with the Parliamentary History, which it has been, and is, one of the principal objects of my life to lay complete before the public of the present day, and,

construction of Mr. Brown, Mr. Barham

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