Imágenes de página
PDF

“ges were extravagant. —The total charge “ for instruments from the beginning of 1795 to the end of 1 Soj, or for years, a nourts to so? 2,019. 4s. 8d. or me otly & 7000 per anion on an average. Whea it is know... that the regionent i surgeons have aways found their own instruments, “ the proo Istv of tirecting so large an addi:io s opply for he use of the army “. . . we's b. Questioned 1 he statement, w on we shall give hereafter, of the quant; y now a store, will evince, we think, hat thro has been a very great disregard to the public interest in making such a provision.—The apothecary general's bills for 1894 and 1905 include large charges for sugar, pearl barley, oatmeal, paper, sheets, bottles. packing-cases, &c, Many of these articles are not usually provided by apothecaries, and therefore it m; y be in gued, that neither the playsician general nor so geon general cañ be very competent to judge of the propriety of the prices charged for them. Had they inquired, however, into the matter, they would have found, perhaps as we have found, that even admitting an extra

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ment, the prices charged are improperly great. -- We have come to th’s conclusion from an examination of Messrs. Trotters' charges for singilar articles supplied to general hospitals, also, in those years, and from the returns made by Messrs. “Curtis and Clarke, corn-factors, and Messrs Harrisons, bottle-merchants, of the prices which similar articles in their different trades bore during the same period. It must be observed, that in Messrs. Trotters' course of dealings with government they have been used, at least during 1804, * calculating on a year's credit to government, to charge about 20 per cent, on the money price of the articles furnished by them : yet their charge for hospital sheets is seven shiftings and four pence, at the time that the apo

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

and, when the apothecary general charges eleven pence per pound for Muscovado sugar, Messrs. Trotters' charge only eight pence per pound : their change for corks is two shillings and four pence per gross ; the apothecary general's sir shillings : he charges for bottles at the rate of CO shillings pergross for quarts, and 53s illings pergross “Jor pints, at the time when, we sea n from “Messrs. Harrisons, the first were sold by “ them at 40 shillings per gross, and the “second for 36 shillings per gross on a cre"dit of six months, and with a discount,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

charge on account of the dolly of pay

thecary general's charge is ten shillings;

“ for money, of one shilling and sixpence

per gross; and these prices we understand to have been the current prices of the trade for the last four years. The market price for oatmeal in 1804, as is to be seen in the returns, fluctuated between 17 and 23 shillings, and averaged during the 12 months nineteen shillings ; and for Scotch barley, between fourteen and twenty-two shillings, and averaged during the same period eighteen shillings; yet the first article is charged by the apothecary general, throughout the year, at twenty-six shitlings per cwt. and the second at twentyseven shillings per cwt. The total of the charges for this description of articles makes comparatively but a small part, “ certainly, of the certified amount of the ' apothecary general's bills ; yet it confirms onr opinion of the inefficiency of the check on his co.orges, and of the great loss which the public has sustained from a loose observance of the order of the treasury directing the physician general and surgeon general, in considering the justness of his prices, to pay attention to the delay of payment to him.” Now, Sir, unless this Report of the Commissioners is false ; unless they, or the persons they examined, have licq, what you assert, respecting the amount of Mr.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Garnier's gains, is not true, but, on the .

contrary, is greatly and manifestly wide of the traib.--—s stated Mr. Garnier to pocket of the public money 12,000 and some odd pounds a year. This I took from his own amount of proots for the last three years. Yon deny that this is a fair way of calculating ; and, you assert, that the average of his gains is not nearly so great. If, by an awer ge, you mean the average upon all the 74 years that the patent and monopoly have been in the family, your assertion is, doubtless, true ; because when the patcht wos first granted, the army did not, in all probability, amount, upon a run of years, to thirty thousand men, instead of three hundred thousand inen, as it now does. But, you well know, that i could have ig . such average in contemplation ; you njust know, that what I meant to state, and what I did state, was the son he nou' receives and clears annually ; and, it making this statement, how coul! I act fairer, than to take the average of the three last year, all the years of which I, or the parliament, possessed an autontic and acknowledged amount of profits : -- You tell me, Sir, that Mr. Gardier is to be looked upon merely as a merc's vot j as a wholesale dealer. You make hia cust

[graphic]

his skin, as a “gentleman of liberal edu“cation and generous habits,” and place bion be: ore me as a mere trader ; a pere wholesale apothecary ; a worker of the pestle and mortar; a downright tradesman nd shop-keeper. “ Bootrol and high, vour first's a country Squiej “ Your next's a toadesman, meck and m ich a lar." I do not impute the latter quality to Mr. Gainier ; but, I think, it will appear to the reader, that the Commissioners do really charge him with having, for his own interest sake, stated, in a nost formal n, anner, what was not true. But, Sir, making Mr. Garnier a tradesman will no answer your purpose, unless you could show, that he had no monopoly ; unless you coold show, that he ran a fair race with other tradesmen ; unless you could remove the fact, proved before the Commissioners, that he sold his goods to the public at a

much higher price than those goods might

have been supplied from other tiadesmen's shops. . I stated that Mr. Garnier pocketed Aé12,000 a year of the public money, without rendering any services whatever in return. This is my statement. You call these of 12,000 profits ; and tell me, that I may as well charge any merchant with pocketing the public money to the amount of the annual profits of his concerns ; the fallacy of which, the mise able sophistry of which, we shall see in a moment.—In the first place, the merchant, pi open ly so called (and when properly so called no character is more respectable ;) the merchant has no monopoly ; there are no part of the public fools enough to have entered into a {. to deal with nobody but him for merchandize, 'I he rnerchant has to look for customers ; i.e has a competition to contend with ; and, there is, all through, a rigorous i quiry into the quantity and quality of his goods. All these circuinstances are waiting to make the case of Mr. Garnier like that of the merchant. Now, then, as to the surn which Mr. Garnier annually pockets, without any services rendered to the suffering public in return. And here, Sir, we will take the average of the last 13 years : his average charge against the public has been sé67,340. Upon which the commissioners state, that he has charged one-fifth of the gross amount more than other tradesmen, in the same line, would, under circumstances exactly similar, have charged the public. Consequently he has received all the profits that he ought, as a tradesman, to have had ; and has, besides those profts,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]

parliament, is false. Yet, Sir, he, notwithstanding his siberal education and generou habits,” condescends to receive, besides this immense sum, ten shillings a day, as as officer upon the staff of the army; yes, as : staff officer, though you yourself declars him to be purely a gentleman, and quite in: capable of any official attendance of any wort Sir, you would fain have it believed, that Mr. Garnier cares little about the preserva. tion of his patent. If this were the case, and if his profits were no greater than will they ought to be, would he not have resign. ed the patent long ago, and, if he had chosen to continue in the trade, have met the com: petition of other tradesmen But, Sir, no only is the presumptive evidence against this assertion of Mr. Garnier's disinterestedness, we have positive proof of his rigid adherento to the privileges granted in his patent. I the year 1797, at the end of 63 years enjoy ment of this lucrative monopoly. it was proposed, or hinted at, that the supply of our gical instruments had better be taken onto his hands; whereupon he wrote a letter, as seriog his privilege to the exclusive supply of those instruments; stating certain fro as to the comparative cheapness of hisati. cles, which statement the Commissionershort proved to be untrue; and, concluding his letter, with saying, that he “ humbly hope that he shall be permitted still to supply to said articles.” Does this, Sir, discover . careessness about the gains arising from the patent 2 The agent, Clarke, swore. that Mr. Garnier never meddled with ans part of the business; but, you see, hetou" meddle, when the object was to present, small part of the monopoly that appeated." be in danger. Is this the mark of “a lite ral education and of generous habits?" It is stated in your letter, Sir, that ot half of the gains are given up, by Mr. Goo nier, to his agents. But, what is that follo

[ocr errors]

public * The reason for this participaliwo manifest enough. “Snacks” is the to word; without snacks, in such a case, M! Garnier could not possibly carry the tho on ; is it not upon this principle of sudo that all the extortions on the public arePro tised ; and, without snacks, would the to

* Commissioners, determined to permit (as

lic treasure be, in any case, wasted as it is, and the taxes increased to the present insupportable weight 2 In a letter, from you, Sir, I should not have expected the assertion, that any thing granted by patent was as sacred as a man's freehold estate, much less should I have expected to see you apply this similitude to the grant in question, the very nature of which has been changed by the lapse of time and the change of circumstances. The grant to Mr. Garnier was made in the year 1747. It is notorious, that, at that time, it could not be in the contemplation of any one, that the army would, even in time of ordinary war, exceed forty thousand men. Time and circumstances have quite changed the effect of the grant, and, would not any man, who had imbibed high and generous feelings from a li/eral education,” have been contented with the grant as it was at first intended ? Instead of which, Mr. Garnier has not only grasped at the whole of the profits arising from this change, but has also procured him self to be placed as an officer upon the staff of the army, at the pay of ten shillings a day, Freehold estate, indeed Oh what a proof of the humbled, the debased state, of this once-high-spirited nation From no other idea than from that of the people being lost to all sense of injury and of insult could such an assertion have been made. Suppose the king were advised to grant, by way of patent, pensions to the amount of all the taxes now raised, and of that of all the incomes of all the people in the country, those of the patentees excepted. Would you still assert that these patents were as sacred as the deeds of freehold estates ? Would you still say, that the nation would be bound by such patents, and that to object to the continuance of such abominable extortion, would be to discover a spirit hostile to the constitution of England 2. Sir, this nation has so long tamely submitted to insult from those who wallow in luxury upon the fruit of its labour, that I shall not say, that, any thing will rouze it to a proper expression of its indignation; but, if any thing can so rouze it; if it be not doomed to the vilest shavery that ever disgraced mankind, language and sentiments such as you, upon this eccasion, have made use of, must have that desirable effect. You, by way of a closing argument, infor, that because “His Majesty's present “..ministers,” whom you fail not to compliment, as being very attentive to the public interest; that, because they have, notwithstanding the exposure made by the

you inform me) Mr. Garnier to go on in his oid way : hence you infer, and appear to suppose that I shall agree, that the army

| could not be supplied upon better terms.

Why, Sir, the same argument would apply to the ten shillings a day to Mr. Garnier, as an officer upon the staff of the army; it would apply to the question of surgical instruments, in which the Commisioners have proved, that the then ministry (the Pitts and the Roses and the Longs) were grossly negligent of their duty; it would apply to all possible cases; it would apply to the question of inquiry into the conduct of the Convention-making generals; it is, in short, saying to the people: “... the ministers think “ the thing right, and, therefore, right it “ must be.” But, Sir, I can suggest motives, other than that of the public good, which might lead to this decision of the ministry in favour of Mr. Garnier. part of the ministry are themselves patent placemen; and those who are not so themselves have children, or other relations, who are. To have trenched upon Mr. Garnier's patent; to have bound him down to fair profits, might have led to an inquiry into the origin of theirs, and into the aunount of the fees, or other emoluments, attached to them. Mr. Garnier can plead no previous services, rendered either by himself or his father, as the foundation of his grant; nor can any of the ministry, for any of the patents, which they and their relations hold. This, Sir, appears to me to be a much better reason for the indulgence they have shown towards their brother patentee, than the one which you have given, and which you really appear to have expected to prove satisfactory to my readers. I , hink I have now, Sir, made good my statement, and have even shown, that that satement was far within bounds, instead of being, as you describe it, a gross exaggeration. A similar fate attends the indiscreet friends of the DUKE OF YORK, whom I shall prove to be in the receipt of a greater income, arising from the taxes, than was stated by me at the Winchester meeting. These indiscreet friends have affected to impute i norance to me; but, l shall prove upon them, ignorance or falsehood as gross as ever yet made its way into print.

Of much greater importance to us is this

subject of a waste of the means of the nation, than are all the politics and wars of the continent of Europe, or of the whole foreign world; for, what is it to us, who gains or who loses, who is set up or who pulled down in Spain or elsewhere, if we are to be slaves; and, it must be evident to

No small '

[ocr errors]

any man of common discernment, that men

who have nothing to coli their own, are, in

fact (whatever they may be called) slavos. In the East Indies, the cultivators of the kind have all the produce taken from them, except just enough to keep them from actually perishing. When the harvest approaches to ripeness, troops are set round the field; to prevent the husbandman from smuggling away any part of the fruit of his labour. All is sized on by the accursed Aumils, or role s of tares; and a miserable pittance handed back to the cultivator for his bare subsistence. This is slavery the most abject ; ten thousand times worse than that experienced in Algiers. To this pitch we, thank God, are not come ; and, it is our duty, a duty we owe to the memory of our fathers, as well as to ourselves and our children, to take care that to this pitch we do not cote. In all our thoughts and deliberations, this ought to be the first object. When, as in the approaching election for this county, we have an opportunity of choosing a person to defend our rights, we should first of all consider, whether he be, or will be, a watchful and faithful guardian of the fruits of our labour; or, whether he be a man likely to avail himself of his power, not to defend us, but to enrich himself at our expence. No matter what party be belongs to, or has belonged to. This is a question beneath our notice. We must resolve to break through these trammels, or we shall continue to be the sport of desiguing knaves, who have so long succeeded in persuading the people, that to be consistent they must continue their support of whatever nan they have onee been led to support, though all the circumstances inay have changed, and though that same man may have falsified all his professions and promises. The occurrences at the last meeting gave me a proof, that the spirit of the country is dormant, but not dead; and, though I know well how mighty corrupt influence is, in this county in particular, I am persuaded, that, in spite of the whole power of that influence, any gentleman of known fortune, of known good moral character, would succeed to the vacant seat, if he came unpropped and unpolluted by party, and stood upon the film ground of the Constitution. For such a man, every man, whose vote was worth having, would vote ; and, that freeholder, who would vote for any other sort of candidate, must be either destitute of sense or of principle.—I am, Sir, your most obedient servant, *

WM, Coe BETT. Botley, 16th Nov. 1808,

... Y. B. It has been suggested to me, that, if Major Hoc AN would advertise the A.in!ers of the four Bank notes, they could be easily traced to their late possessors; and, as his not having done this, is, by many intelligent and respectable persons, regarded as Just ground of doubt with respect to the truth of the history connected with those notes, I confess, that I should be much pleased to see it done.

MR. Poulte R's LETTER.
Meons toke, Nov 10, 1 SOS.

SIR,-My immediate view in thus aidressing you is, through your favour and candour, to correct some of the errors respecting my part in the late Hampshire County Meeting, which have bee, co in your journal, as well as in mos: - newspapers, from the report taken others, of whose partiality I shall hereaf. speak.--First, with regard to what I said . Mr. Gal hier, whom I am erroneously stated to have termed, my relation, I desire to repeat my words which were these, “I re“ frained from speaking to order before, “ because it concerned the case of a per“ son, with whom if I may not call myself “ connected, yet to whom I feel myself so “ strongly attached that I might appear, as “ I am, partial to a character which how“ ever I admire, I leave to speak for itself “ to all who know him.”—s have to add, in answer to your subsequent journal, that I am now desirous of speaking for him, to all who know him not ; to which latter description I think you belong. You therein state your object at the treeting to have been, to give his friends an opportunity to answer you—a fair object I -admit. and give you credit for its being so intended by you ; but contend that it was wholly unattainable in the manner proposed, because no such opportunity was thereby given; for all discussion of the case was so absolutely inadmissible, that had I, or any other person, as well inclined and better enabled to do it justice, attempted it, his discussion of it must have been prevented in the same way, and for the same reason, that your introduction of it was interrupted, as being entirely out of order; and herein I complain of your introducing a case, in the nature of a charge, at a place and time where and when it could not be discussed in defence ; thereby leaving a reflection, which, however false, could not be then removed. Since your journal does now afford that opportunity of answer, which your speech, however so intended by you, did net, I trust you are now as ready to give it by your insertion as I am to take it by my sig.

gestion of the following answer—Though

your subsequent information, and admis

sion, in part anticipates my objectio;'s to your previous reflexions, yet your continued arguments and assertions, and still more the public impression, which being once made by you requires being removed by me, make me persist in this necessary communication to you and them.—if, as you argue, Mr. Garnier's situation has a natural tendency to his general dependence and to his particular attachment to war, he has the more extraordinary me; it for being, as you partly admit, and as he wholly is, in effect, free from both those natural failings, for which you allow he has sufficient catase, and therefore excuse ; of which, however, he beed not avail himself, for it is notorious to those who know him, that of all men you could have singled out, he is the most sore and tender on the subject of war; the very name and nature of which he loaths and abhors, both from his general feelings of humanity, and his particular sufferances of calamity under it, loor you and the pubfic are to learn, that in all honourable and sensible estimation of loss and gain, such as would never be denied to any indifferent 2erson, much less to him, he is on a baance of feeling and fortune an infinitely greater loser than gainer by the war, which neither you nor they will be surprised to year when I inform you, that he has lost four sons, in the service of his country of the war, and most happily would he repay the money he has gained, could you restore the »lood he has lost; for of all men, he is the ast, who from his liberal education, geneous habits, and parental feelings, would Yarter affections for interests. These may be called my speculative inferences from his upposed feelings, though even in that fiew I cannot think them over strained ; bat he facts themselves confirm my supposiions, for in the first place, so far is he trom being actually a particular approver of the war, or even a general supporter of government, that nothing has ever induced hitn, or if I can judge from what he has said or done on that subject, ever will induce him, to support the war by any thought, word, or deed. In the next place, so far is he from having been an uniform supporter of goverrment, as you suppose, that he has frequelyly been in opposition to it. As a common case in point, which is better than any other single instance I could give, I adduce, his ong and constant support of Mr. Jervoise juring his continued cpposition to several different administrations;—so much for xir, G's, actual independence of conduct.

In proof of his virtual independence of si-. tuation, I produce the following statement of his case.—Mr. Garnier's Patent Place, of apot!,ecary general to the army, was granted to him in reversion, during the life of his father, who had a forayer grant, dated March 1735; Mr. Garnier's patent bears date the 19th of January 1747, the year in which he was at Eton School, from whence he proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge. It therefore appears that this patent has been in the family 74 years, during which time, the business has been. transacted by deputy.—There is no salary annexed to the office, but the patent officer is considered as belonging to the staff of the artny, and receives ten shillings a day.-

[blocks in formation]

titled who trades with a large capital.–It is

necessary to undeceive you and the public, by stating, Mr. Garnier does not receive twelve thousand a year, out of the public money : give me leave therefore to explaint his particular situation, from which, I am persoaded, you will agree with me, in thinking, he is not overpaid, for the great risk. and responsibility, which has frequently been to the amount of £6 150,000 a year. Mr. G. is, by his patent, to furnish the whole British army with drugs and medical stores ; and must always be prepared to . meet the demands of an iminense army, at , any moment; he is bound to keep a great stock of articles solely for the service of the army.—Mr. Garnier's profits and perquisites, you state to amount to so 12 000 a year; this estimate you have taken from the profits of the three last years only, and I conceive, you give a false itnpression of the 3|ace, when you assert the apothecary general receives that sum annually ; whereas the general average would not amount to one- . . fourth of that sun).--Mr. Garnier, who is incapable of mantoing any part of this great concern, employs agents to carry on the medical trade ; and the better to ensure. the faithful discharge of the duties of the place, he has always given up one half c his own profits, (whatever they might be,). as a remuneration to them ; as also to se

[blocks in formation]
« AnteriorContinuar »